Author Topic: Hiking on the decline?  (Read 1761 times)

ninthace

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Hiking on the decline?
« on: 17:09:27, 31/08/18 »
From the Daily Telegraph today:


Number of long walks tumbles over course of decade

People in England are taking fewer long walks a year than they did a decade ago, figures show. Statistics released by the Department for Transport indicate that the average person takes 255 hikes a year on foot, but only 63 of these are over one mile.
In 2008, men and women were walking less frequently (242 times on average), but longer (73 times over a mile). In 2012, people were taking 67 longer walks a year, which also dropped to 63 a year in 2016 and 2017.


It would be interesting to know where the DfT think walking stops and hiking starts.   Also good to know that they think hiking is done on foot, I was worried I was doing it wrong. Still, good to know that Mrs N and I are bucking the trend.
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fernman

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Re: Hiking on the decline?
« Reply #1 on: 17:38:05, 31/08/18 »
the average person takes 255 hikes a year on foot, but only 63 of these are over one mile.

Strange statistics, given that there are 365 days in a year. Some people must be doing many times my share! Surely they must include taking the dog round the block for its constitutional?

Islandplodder

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Re: Hiking on the decline?
« Reply #2 on: 17:41:13, 31/08/18 »

I wonder where they get their figures from.
Not to mention their definitions if a long walk is over a mile!

Percy

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Re: Hiking on the decline?
« Reply #3 on: 18:26:40, 31/08/18 »
Yes, a very odd definition of 'hike'. At less than a mile the bulk of these 'hikes' will be trips to the paper shop. Or 'hikes' to the bus stop.

rural roamer

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Re: Hiking on the decline?
« Reply #4 on: 19:29:50, 31/08/18 »
Definitely think their definition of a “hike”is probably not the same as ours! Still, more space in the hills for us.

astaman

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Re: Hiking on the decline?
« Reply #5 on: 20:49:52, 31/08/18 »
It does seem strange. I guess it's just a bit of a category error. The use of the word hike in the context of walking in daily life makes the report seem absurd. If you take the word hike out and replace it with walk then it becomes a slightly troubling report about people taking less exercise in the context of their daily lives. It would be interesting to know if 'hike' was the word the DfT used or did it come from the journalist writing in the Telegraph. I also wonder where on earth the data comes from. I suppose they survey people on things like this but I never seem to get surveyed, or anybody I've ever met either. I'm sure they have methods of allowing for people not telling the truth in surveys but I do wonder - I remember as teenager putting some home brewed lager in a urine specimen bottle for a medical experiment and no-one seemed to notice.

rural roamer

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Re: Hiking on the decline?
« Reply #6 on: 08:06:20, 01/09/18 »
I wonder if this is related to the headline in our local paper - “ Concerns over Suffolk adults failing to walk  10 consecutive minutes a week”. Though it doesn’t mention “hiking”.
http://www.ipswichstar.co.uk/news/survey-reveals-29-of-suffolk-people-do-not-walk-ten-minutes-a-week-1-5676575

madame cholet

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Re: Hiking on the decline?
« Reply #7 on: 09:44:33, 01/09/18 »
In line with the statistic that 60%of the population are overweight. What concerns me that walking and cycling are seen as leasure and fitness activities not transport! Also a long walk is classified as over a mile!
« Last Edit: 09:52:43, 01/09/18 by madame cholet »
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Ridge

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Re: Hiking on the decline?
« Reply #8 on: 09:52:37, 01/09/18 »
It would be interesting to know if 'hike' was the word the DfT used or did it come from the journalist writing in the Telegraph.
Guess what, it is from the WALKING and cycling report
https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/walking-and-cycling-statistics-england-2017

There has been no change in the distance that people walk in a year since 2002

Quote
I remember as teenager putting some home brewed lager in a urine specimen bottle for a medical experiment and no-one seemed to notice.
Probably normal alcohol content for most teenagers.
Over hill, over dale. Thorough brush, thorough brier....
I do wander every where

Dyffryn Ardudwy

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Re: Hiking on the decline?
« Reply #9 on: 12:31:56, 01/09/18 »
I would have thought that hiking and walking are both the same.
Hiking would be the old terminology used to describe a country walk,

As for a mode of exercise in sad decline, that has only been written by journalist who has never ventured near a National Park, or has little knowledge of the outdoors.

A recent article in the welsh news, is that there is a distinct possibility that the Snowdonia National park will start charging organised groups intent on climbing Snowdon.

Such is the popularity of the mountain, that its almost that the National Park wants to deter organised parties.


I know that is not the case, but the thought of actually charging organised groups to use the paths up Snowdon, was never considered a few years ago.


For it to be even on the agenda of the SNP, must mean footfall on the mountain must be at a level that the National Park are struggling to cope with.

The visitor numbers this year, and last, have been overwhelming, with the erosion on the paths up Snowdon becoming critical, and a parks budget unable to cope.

Yesterday, during my Welsh 3 peaks jaunt, Storey Arms was very busy for a work day, i found somewhere to park, but it was never like this thirty odd years ago.

The carpark for the Pony Path up Cader, was full to capacity, with some drivers having to turn away with disappointed faces.

As for llanberis, very busy as usual, and the llanberis path up Snowdon, not heaving as i thought it might be, but still a considerable number of walkers around.


I suppose the article is written about the whole country as a whole, but in the walking HIKING hot spots,  visitor numbers and footfall on the mountains are at record levels.
« Last Edit: 12:38:34, 01/09/18 by Dyffryn Ardudwy »

jimbob

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Re: Hiking on the decline?
« Reply #10 on: 17:46:40, 01/09/18 »
[quote author=Dyffryn Ardudwy link=topic=37099.msg527249#msg527249

I suppose the article is written about the whole country as a whole, but in the walking HIKING hot spots,  visitor numbers and footfall on the mountains are at record levels."

No supposing about it, had you read the article you would have known it was about the whole population.
Can I dare to ask  where you got your data from to show the "record levels".
For every full car park you mention, I could quote a BnB which has shut down on a National trail due to lack of custom. In itself, a full car park is just that, there may be a very good pie shop close to them. Seeing as there is an obesity epidemic I reckon,without any form of proof, that pies are more favoured than hiking.
Too little, too late, too bad......

Dyffryn Ardudwy

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Re: Hiking on the decline?
« Reply #11 on: 18:07:29, 01/09/18 »
I was not discussing the entire country, which by the apparence of the majorities waste line, walking or leaving ones vehicle at home, is becoming a rarity.
Read any of the current articles on the Snowdonia National Park and Gwynedd Council websites, and see the type of topics under discussion.
In last weeks Western Mail, they had an article on the distinct possibility of organised charity events who want to use Snowdon, being charged, due to the significant increase in visitor numbers.

I cannot comment on the situation in Cumbria and the Lakes, as i do not visit the area, but i very much doubt if visitor numbers are poor.

Travelling to and from Deganwy on the coast, from Dyffryn every week, the foreign visitor numbers are certainly on the increase, with mostly German and Dutch visitors making up the number plates.

Anyone who is a regular walker and denies that visitor numbers to our National Parks are not on the increase are in denial.

I am sure the average person, or those who do not take regular exercise, be it walking , are certainly on the increase, the obesity crisis is there for all to see.

As a walker, trying to find a parking place in the popular hotspots, is now becoming a real headache.

Many years ago, it was very easy to park at the Storey Arms carpark mid week, you just turned up, and off you went on your walk.

Yesterday morning, it was very busy, with only a few parking places up for grabs.

Thirty years ago, that would never have happened.

Nationally i am sure fewer people walk to the shops, and school kids are taxied to school when they could walk.

For us walkers or hikers, who regularly head out into the hills, the story makes little or no sense, because we can clearly see walking numbers in Snowdonia especially, are far busier than even a decade ago.

jimbob

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Re: Hiking on the decline?
« Reply #12 on: 19:11:56, 01/09/18 »
So DA, you have no actual proof for your statement but decide to reinforce your lack of actual facts with personal beliefs.
The question was "where the DfT thinks walking stops and hiking begins"
My cardiac rehab people stated that we should try and walk 4 miles per day, with no proof that it was better than 3 or worse than 5. It was a case of it being better than nothing.Their hope was that it would lead to more strenuous exercise.Given the DfT figures  it would appear that for the majority of the population the difference between  walking and hiking is a difference  they are never going to have an answer to, as they experience neither.

Too little, too late, too bad......

Mel

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Re: Hiking on the decline?
« Reply #13 on: 20:47:50, 01/09/18 »
From the Daily Telegraph today:


Number of long walks tumbles over course of decade

People in England are taking fewer long walks a year than they did a decade ago, figures show. Statistics released by the Department for Transport indicate that the average person takes 255 hikes a year on foot, but only 63 of these are over one mile.
In 2008, men and women were walking less frequently (242 times on average), but longer (73 times over a mile). In 2012, people were taking 67 longer walks a year, which also dropped to 63 a year in 2016 and 2017.


It would be interesting to know where the DfT think walking stops and hiking starts.   Also good to know that they think hiking is done on foot, I was worried I was doing it wrong. Still, good to know that Mrs N and I are bucking the trend.


Well, well. Wonders never cease.  By that "definition" in the Daily Telegraph, all those scenic walks to the shops I do of between 1 and 2 miles makes me an "above average hiker"  :D



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pleb

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Re: Hiking on the decline?
« Reply #14 on: 09:30:09, 02/09/18 »
We never doubted it Mel  ;D