Author Topic: Lost and found  (Read 885 times)

Hillhiker1

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Lost and found
« on: 12:57:40, 27/10/18 »
I found an item of photography equipment in the Rivington area. Lancashire today. If you think it's yours PM me with a description.

Rob Goes Walking

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Re: Lost and found
« Reply #1 on: 21:21:10, 27/10/18 »
Maybe you should hand it in to the local police station? Or just give them a ring and describe it to them, that's usually enough. You're supposed to according to the law and that's where I'd phone to see if anyone had handed it in.

If nobody claims it after a certain period of time then it then it's legally yours too instead of being theft by finding.

Hillhiker1

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Re: Lost and found
« Reply #2 on: 21:24:04, 27/10/18 »
Aye, that's what I'll be doing. I just haven't had chance today though. O0

Hillhiker1

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Re: Lost and found
« Reply #3 on: 19:07:07, 28/10/18 »

It's now done online apparently:https://doitonline.lancashire.police.uk/LostProperty/Create



 Duly completed.



fernman

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Re: Lost and found
« Reply #4 on: 19:39:04, 28/10/18 »
Press headline 27 October 2018. It was published in an online local news website, but the article is credited to a Guardian journalist:
Lost property - police may no longer be able to help.

POLICE may no longer help you if you have lost property — and if you find someone else's property, you may be told to locate the owner yourself.  It was agreed nationally by the National Police Chiefs' Council that forces across the country would no longer be expected to accept lost property reports, except in certain circumstances.
 This change was implemented on October 1.
 It means that if you lose your keys, police will not help you and if you find someone else's, police will not accept them and will tell you to find the owner yourself.
 If you lose your phone, police will not take a lost report, but if you find one, police will accept it so that the owner can be traced.
 For many items, the police advise going to lost property websites or taking to social media to either find a lost item or reunite a lost item with its owner.
 Below is a guide issued by the police on how to report lost and found property.
 
  • LOST
  • Hazardous items such as firearms, shotguns, ammunition, explosives, poisons, toxins or chemicals — report to police immediately.
  • Bicycles — the police will not take a lost report. Visit www.bikeregister.com to report your loss. Reports are searchable by police forces nationwide and insurance companies to help restore property or process a claim.
  • Mobile telephones, MP3 players, computers or any equipment with a serial number — the police will not take a lost report. Visit www.immobilise.com to report your loss. Reports are searchable by police forces nationwide and insurance companies to help restore property or process a claim.
  • Identifiable items, for example with the owner’s name and address or other contact details in or on the item — the police will not take a lost report. If the item is handed in, police will make efforts to contact the owner.
  • Items which do not have a serial number, but have a high monetary (over £500) or sentimental value (e.g. heirlooms) — speak to a member of police staff who will see what additional assistance can be offered.
  • Prescribed medication and drugs — contact GP or NHS and seek guidance.
  • Passports, driving licences, ID cards and other official documents — lost UK passports or driving licences should be reported directly to the Passport Office or DVLA. Lost non-UK passports, driving licences or ID cards should be reported in person at the nearest police station. Other official documents, such as birth, marriage and death certificates should be reported directly to the issuing office.
  • Cash, bank cards, credit cards and cheque books — for lost cash that is not contained within a purse/wallet containing identifiable items, the owner should make enquiries at the location they think the cash was lost. If this is unsuccessful, contact the police station nearest to where it is thought to be lost. For lost bank cards, credit cards or cheque books, report to the issuing bank, building society or credit card company.
  • Unidentifiable, low value items — police say it is highly unlikely that items such as luggage, empty purses, empty wallets or low value unidentifiable items such as umbrellas, spectacles, used or soiled clothing and perishable goods will be handed to the police. Therefore, the owner is advised to make enquiries at the location the item was lost.
  • FOUND
  • Hazardous items such as firearms, shotguns, ammunition, explosives, poisons, toxins or chemicals — never attempt to handle dangerous items and report to police immediately.
  • Bicycles — the police will not accept found bicycles. The finder can check whether the bike has been reported stolen at www.bikeregister.com.
  • Mobile telephones, computers, tablets, MP3 players and any other item capable of containing data — hand in to a police station or to a police officer or police community support officer so the owner can be traced or the item otherwise dealt with.
  • UK Passports — hand in to a police station or to a police officer or police community support officer.
  • Cash, including cash within a wallet or purse that is identifiable — hand in to a police station or to a police officer or police community support officer.
  • Bank cards, identity cards, personal documentation (e.g. bank statements, benefits books) — either follow the instructions on the back of the card or documents or hand in to a police station or to a police officer or police community support officer.
  • Birth, marriage and death certificates — the General Register Office asks that you destroy the item to prevent fraudulent use. Alternatively, you can hand in to a police station or to a police officer or police community support officer.
  • UK Driving Licence — return to the DVLA or hand in to a police station or to a police officer or police community support officer.
  • Non UK passports, driving licences and other identity documents — return to the embassy of the issuing country or hand in to a police station or to a police officer or police community support officer.
  • Unidentifiable or low value property, such as empty handbags, bags, cases, wallets, purses, used or soiled clothing, perishable goods, rubbish, umbrellas, spectacles, animals, keys, watches, jewellery — the police will not accept these items. The finder should make reasonable enquiries, which could include asking people nearby, enquiries in nearby premises, advertising your find on social media. If still unidentified there is nothing more the police can do and you should dispose of the property.

  • Rob Goes Walking

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    Re: Lost and found
    « Reply #5 on: 19:47:32, 28/10/18 »
    That's interesting. Jewellery, so if I find a gold ring with diamonds set in it I don't have to contact the police anymore? Or is it only low value jewellery?

    Citizens advice are still advising people to report their lost phones to the police and get a crime reference number for insurance. Did this change actually go through?

    Anyway, they accepted Hillhiker1's report so presumably if the person who lost it phones up they will check for them.
    « Last Edit: 19:58:56, 28/10/18 by Rob Goes Walking »