Author Topic: What brush to use when waxing your leather boots (and what technique)  (Read 1417 times)

Deolman

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I purchased my last two pairs of Altberg boots from Whaley Warm and Dry.  They advised me to simply use your fingers as the use of cloth/brushes means a certain amount of wax will be wasted as it soaks into the cloth/brush.  I leave the boots for a little while after waxing then to allow the wax to be fully absorbed then  use a brush to buff them up. I use Leder-Gris after each walk and Leder-Gris Extreme once a month.

alan de enfield

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On my Meindl's I use "Cotswold Boot Wax" applied with a cloth and well rubbed in (generating a bit of heat in the fingertips) then buffed with a cloth.
Ingredients :
Natural Beeswax

Instructions :
Apply sparingly with a clean cloth
Allow to dry
For best results apply 2 or 3 coats.

On her 'Horse Tack' my wife uses "Leather Soft Soap" that 'cleans and protects'
Ingredients :
Tallow oleine, Glycerine, Citronella oil

Instructions :
Apply with a well wrung out sponge and work into the leather to lift dirt and grease, conditions and softens leather. For a complete finish, allow to dry and polish with a soft dry cloth.
Do not use on Suede or untreated leather.


Having read up on Google - Tallow Oil is an 'useful' lubricant and now only used in 'fine', expensive soaps

Any suggestions / comments / experiences as to the 'Tack Cleaner and softener' being better than the Beeswax ?
« Last Edit: 13:18:47, 21/11/18 by alan de enfield »

NeilC

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For a proper job on them, I use the method Lowa seemed to be recommending which is to rinse and scrub the boots in water to clean and dampen the leather. Then spray with waterproofing spray whilst they're still damp, and let that dry which supposedly draws that stuff into the leather. Then I use a brush to apply whatever wax I fancy using - Ledergris or some beeswax stuff I've had for years, ensuring the seams and joins catch extra wax and then use the hairdryer to melt it all in. Brush them up the next day to remove any excess.


I don't do this after every walk, just when when they've got really wet and I can see the wax has come off. For shorter walks or dry walks they get either nothing or a quick brush over with a bit of wax. I do think you can overwax them if you're not careful.


I heard one theory is to heat the boots first, with a hairdryer and then apply wax and let it cool, again to draw the wax into the leather. No idea if it works.

Mel

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Edit: for Alan de Enfield...

Think of tack cleaner as the Nikwax Tech Wash of the horsey world - you'd still need to re-proof now and again.  As for nourishing, I'd be inclined to continue with a dubbin style wax every now and again on boots even if I was using the tack cleaner, then buff up to polish and shine to seal in the oils and provide a bead-up-able waterproof finish.









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alan de enfield

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Edit: for Alan de Enfield...

Think of tack cleaner as the Nikwax Tech Wash of the horsey world - you'd still need to re-proof now and again.  As for nourishing, I'd be inclined to continue with a dubbin style wax every now and again on boots even if I was using the tack cleaner, then buff up to polish and shine to seal in the oils and provide a bead-up-able waterproof finish.



Thanks for that - I'm not unhappy with the beeswax so I guess I'll stick with that for now.

fit old bird

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I think I must be a complete slut, reading what everyone else does. I have a table in the garden, I brush off excess dry mud with a scrubbing brush, use a cloth to apply wax, and an old toothbrush to push it into the cracks and crannies. Then leave, no buffing, they are going to get dirty again anyway.
 O0
ilona

NeilC

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I think I must be a complete slut, reading what everyone else does. I have a table in the garden, I brush off excess dry mud with a scrubbing brush, use a cloth to apply wax, and an old toothbrush to push it into the cracks and crannies. Then leave, no buffing, they are going to get dirty again anyway.
 O0
ilona


Which is almost certainly perfectly fine.



I assume you're not male? Because if there is a way of making a simple task overly complex and technical then that's what most men will do. We can't just wax boots. We have to find THE optimal possible way of waxing boots.

fit old bird

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Which is almost certainly perfectly fine.

I assume you're not male? Because if there is a way of making a simple task overly complex and technical then that's what most men will do. We can't just wax boots. We have to find THE optimal possible way of waxing boots.


Yep, female, 69 year old pensioner. I try and make my life as simple as possible. To be honest, I couldn't understand why anyone would ask which kind of brush. I can only think that it might be from someone who is new to walking, and has paid lots of dosh for the best pair of boots ever and wants them to last a lifetime.


I am at an age where trivialities are of no consequence, I don't stress myself out by making things more complicated than they need to be. Any old brush will do, the lavatory brush if that's the only one you have.
 :-*

Rob Goes Walking

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To be honest, I couldn't understand why anyone would ask which kind of brush. I can only think that it might be from someone who is new to walking, and has paid lots of dosh for the best pair of boots ever and wants them to last a lifetime.
You're not far off, I used to walk in the south downs years ago but I've never owned leather boots before and they were expensive yes. I'm new to walking in the Lakes, the fells are very different to the sort of walking I used to do.