Author Topic: Do you buy gear that 'links together' or buy separatedly?  (Read 617 times)

gunwharfman

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When I first started serious hiking I bought my items separately but since a few years ago I now try to buy 'intergrated!' For example I don't think sleeping gear works well enough unless they work well together. So for me I use a NeoAir mattress, a fitted sheet, my sleeping quilt and when its really cold I throw over my sleeping blanket. My tent comes into this 'package' as well, can I just slide my inflated mattress in without it getting snagged on the entrance material, can I throw my quilt in without having to get down on my knees to do it, etc, are the tent pockets to hand to just throw item in or take out without having to be a contortionist first? I find it all matters in the end.

My boots for another example, I not only seek out the boots but the boot inserts, the socks and the gaiters as well. I also give more thought to my waterproof/windproof jacket as well, how much space do I need between skin and jacket for baselayer, shirt, warm layer and so on. The hood for me is very important, what hat or head covering is best for it, I just do not like bare plasticky material to stick to my ears when hiking along. I'm maybe getting too fussy in my old age but if it all works well together I feel my long hikes are much easier to deal with.

ninthace

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The only thing I have remotely like that is I have a second fleece that zips into my Berghaus jacket.  Everything else has been a one off purchase:- either impulse buy, replacement or needed for new activity.
Solvitur Ambulando

sussamb

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I've got one of those fleeces, never zip it in though  ;D
Where there's a will ...

ninthace

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I've got one of those fleeces, never zip it in though  ;D


TBH these days I only wear the whole combination in extreme conditions, such as skiing in -25C plus 20+ knots of wind.  Under those  conditions it is handy not to have to fiddle to fasten the layers while wearing thick gloves as it doesn't do to hang about  :) .
The fleeces have seen a lot more wearing than the jacket and one of them is quite a bit younger than the shell which is now the best part of 20 years old and still going strong.
Solvitur Ambulando

pauldawes

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When buying boots or walking shoes I take the type of socks I'm likely to use with them, to check comfort of "combined fit". (Ages ago use to buy socks and boots at same time..but now got so many walking socks, just wasteful to buy more.)


Apart from that, buy separately...nearly always nowadays just replacement items as old kit wears out.

Maggot

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When I first started serious hiking I bought my items separately but since a few years ago I now try to buy 'intergrated!' For example I don't think sleeping gear works well enough unless they work well together. So for me I use a NeoAir mattress, a fitted sheet, my sleeping quilt and when its really cold I throw over my sleeping blanket. My tent comes into this 'package' as well, can I just slide my inflated mattress in without it getting snagged on the entrance material, can I throw my quilt in without having to get down on my knees to do it, etc, are the tent pockets to hand to just throw item in or take out without having to be a contortionist first? I find it all matters in the end.



So when you go hiking you put an air mattress, a fitted sheet and a quilt and an extra blanket if it is cold in your rucksack?  Seriously?


Is there a reason you don't take a snuggly sleeping bag?

NeilC

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Not sure how any more integration would help tbh. My sleeping mat fits the tent, sleeping bag fits me. Not sure how integrated it could get. Or am I missing the point?


I am quite interested in an integrated stove mind, like an MSR Windburner.

jimbob

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So when you go hiking you put an air mattress, a fitted sheet and a quilt and an extra blanket if it is cold in your rucksack?  Seriously?


Is there a reason you don't take a snuggly sleeping bag?
Having been influenced by his approach  to walking I totally agree with the approach taken  by Gunwharfman.
Takes up the same space as a sleeping bag and bag liner, and can be lighter dependant on choice (no zips).Can be mixed and matched to suit conditions. Most take a sleep mattress anyway. Love GWMs approach.

Don't be frightened  to question normal practice Maggot you may develop much better practice.
Too little, too late, too bad......

Maggot

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Having been influenced by his approach  to walking I totally agree with the approach taken  by Gunwharfman.
Takes up the same space as a sleeping bag and bag liner, and can be lighter dependant on choice (no zips).Can be mixed and matched to suit conditions. Most take a sleep mattress anyway. Love GWMs approach.

Don't be frightened  to question normal practice Maggot you may develop much better practice.


Ha, I am not scared to question practice.  But if it is cold, why introduce cold spots, I don't believe for a single minute that the quilt has never fallen off!  A sleeping bag can never fall off.  A quilt cover weighs considerably more than a zip in a sleeping bag.  In fact a quilt will weigh the same as a decent sleeping bag, so you are actually adding another blanket and a sheet.


I think that actually the questioning of 'normal practice' happened years ago when everyone used blankets, people then decided to sew the end and the sides up to make a sleeping bag!


Then there is the 'how much room between the coat and your skin' thing.  I reckon you would be hard pushed to find a skin tight outer layer that would be so tight as to not allow the addition of a base layer, jumper and fleece.


jimbob

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Down quilts are considerably lighter than sleeping bags. Camping blankets are like fleece material and together they weigh less than an average bag.  No, I have not personally had cold spots at anytime.  The bit of the sleeping bag between your body and the bed/ground has little or no insulation value as per many threads on this forum over the years. With the use of the correct thermals this is a combo I am now more than happy with and thank GWM for giving his kit list and real life experiences in previous postings. I have to say I was also sceptical but experience has won the day.

Nothing worse than being trapped in a bag on a warm humid night. 

Too little, too late, too bad......

Mel

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Re: Do you buy gear that 'links together' or buy separatedly?
« Reply #10 on: 19:40:31, 20/11/18 »
I always buy a right shoe when I buy a left shoe  :-\




Sorrrreeeeeeeeeeeeyyy,  kak day at work and I need to let off a bit of steam by way of some mindless stupidity  :-*


No expense spared in pursuit of a bargain ;)
https://snailspacewalks.blogspot.co.uk/

jimbob

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Re: Do you buy gear that 'links together' or buy separatedly?
« Reply #11 on: 20:03:43, 20/11/18 »
No way Mel!

For the last week or so you've done nothing but complain about some KIT or other. :D
Too little, too late, too bad......

Maggot

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Re: Do you buy gear that 'links together' or buy separatedly?
« Reply #12 on: 22:13:06, 20/11/18 »
Down quilts are considerably lighter than sleeping bags. Camping blankets are like fleece material and together they weigh less than an average bag.  No, I have not personally had cold spots at anytime.  The bit of the sleeping bag between your body and the bed/ground has little or no insulation value as per many threads on this forum over the years. With the use of the correct thermals this is a combo I am now more than happy with and thank GWM for giving his kit list and real life experiences in previous postings. I have to say I was also sceptical but experience has won the day.

Nothing worse than being trapped in a bag on a warm humid night.


What thermal value does a fitted sheet provide?  Underneath is about the sleeping mat!


Don't get me wrong, I love the idea of taking a fitted sheet and quilt camping, but I guess there is a reason that this system was ditched by people who want to be warm in all conditions at night!

jimbob

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Re: Do you buy gear that 'links together' or buy separatedly?
« Reply #13 on: 22:26:37, 20/11/18 »
I think you need to read through various threads where GWM explained his need for a fitted sheet. 
Nowt to do with thermal value.
To do with comfort on that particular sleep mat.I use a silk bag liner. Then like the liners you stated you carry it can be used in various ways as a sheet or as extra warmth should I ever be stupid enough to camp in temps below zero again. I found your favoured snugpack bag to be as useful as a chocolate fireguard and ditched it in Northern Spain when I then converted to this system. I also have an Alpkit 700  which I only take when the forecast is uncertain although I am getting less adventurous and tend to avoid cold camping. Can't be bothered walking many miles following a cold sleepless night. After all the only reason I camp is because I want to walk. I tend not to be a wannabe SAS survival specialist.
Too little, too late, too bad......

gunwharfman

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Re: Do you buy gear that 'links together' or buy separatedly?
« Reply #14 on: 11:18:50, 21/11/18 »
I bought the NeoAir because I wanted an inflatable mattress that kept the ground cold from getting though to my body, I've found it does this very effectively. I bought the fitted sheet because I tend to only wear boxer shorts in the warmer months and I'm not keen to sleep directly on NeoAir plastic, plus it cuts down noise when I turn over during the night. My motivation for buying my sleeping quilt was twofold, I wanted to lower carrying weight and to buy something that compressed into a smaller size. having no hood and no back on my quilt solved both problems. Obviously nothing is perfect, but I began to notice the cold a bit as I've become older and I think my quilt perhaps has lost some heat retaining qualities over the years that I have owned it. I thought of various ideas (New down, wearing more clothes overnight etc. I do not want to spend out money on another quilt) so in the interim I bought a simple cheap (5.99) throwover camping blanket from Decathlon. I used it in the Lakes recently, worked a treat, I was so warm both nights, I had to throw it off me from about midnight until about 5am. I then felt chilly again and pulled it back over me! It never occurred to me that my outlay would be less than 6, I was prepared to pay more, now I don't have to.