Author Topic: Anyone use Dubbin?  (Read 580 times)

Sleepy

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Anyone use Dubbin?
« on: 20:59:34, 22/11/18 »
It's years since I used it but I remember I could almost see it doing good. I've bought a couple of tins over the years but it's not the same - more like bees wax, the stuff I'm thinking of was a lot like grease. Does anyone know where I can get this old fashioned sort?
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ninthace

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Re: Anyone use Dubbin?
« Reply #1 on: 23:13:16, 22/11/18 »
Timpson sell dubbin, not sure how it compares with the old fashioned stuff.  I prefer Leder Gris green top and red top.
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Rather be walking

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Re: Anyone use Dubbin?
« Reply #2 on: 12:22:19, 23/11/18 »
Cor Duddin,  haven't use than for some years. :)
I use to use Nix-Wax in a tin for years and now you can only get the water-based cream which didn't work as well, so found Leder-Gris, good stuff :)
Jon.
« Last Edit: 12:26:00, 23/11/18 by Rather be walking »
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Sleepy

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Re: Anyone use Dubbin?
« Reply #3 on: 06:25:05, 24/11/18 »
I know leder gris is comparible, there's just something I like about keeping it traditional. I think I might have to try the horsey stuff, there's an element of traditionalism in the equine world so hopefully it's the same stuff


I just don't want to keep buying tins of so called dubbin only to find that it's nothing like what I know of as dubbin.....
"These are dangerous times we live in", I heard a man once say, "if you're prone to flights of fancy, your dreams can fly away"

taxino8

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ninthace

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Re: Anyone use Dubbin?
« Reply #5 on: 10:34:30, 24/11/18 »
I know leder gris is comparible, there's just something I like about keeping it traditional. I think I might have to try the horsey stuff, there's an element of traditionalism in the equine world so hopefully it's the same stuff


I just don't want to keep buying tins of so called dubbin only to find that it's nothing like what I know of as dubbin.....


The problem is that leather treatments have changed over the years and a modern leather is not the same as the leathers of yesteryear.  As a result, leather treatments have had to evolve with them.  If you treat a modern leather with “good old fashioned dubbin” you are not likely to achieve the result you are looking for and your boot will absorb water as a result.
See here for a history   https://www.altberg.co.uk/leder-gris/history-of-leder-gris/ as it pertains to Leder Gris.  The underlying lesson is that a modern boot leather has been treated during manufacture to make it water repellant. You need a coating that complements that treatment.
If you Google the ingredients of “modern” dubbin you will find they are in fact very similar to other modern boot treatment products.
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NeilC

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Re: Anyone use Dubbin?
« Reply #6 on: 19:49:03, 26/11/18 »
I just don't want to keep buying tins of so called dubbin only to find that it's nothing like what I know of as dubbin.....


That is a problem with dubbin: there is no agreed formula. It's traditionally a mix of natural oils, greases, fats and waxes. Could contain anything from fish oil, lard, mink oil, beeswax - any greasy substance the manufacturer wants to put in. No two brands are the same and never have been.




AFANASIEW

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Re: Anyone use Dubbin?
« Reply #7 on: 14:10:45, 27/11/18 »
I seem to recall reading a warning that dubbin would eventually rot stitching.
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ninthace

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Re: Anyone use Dubbin?
« Reply #8 on: 14:29:33, 27/11/18 »
I seem to recall reading a warning that dubbin would eventually rot stitching.


Something of an urban myth now  I believe.  I think it was based on the idea that old fashioned dubbin was based on animal fat (tallow) that attracted bacteria that would then eat the cotton stitching.  As far as I know modern boot stitching is synthetic fibre so will not rot.  Another theory is that the stickiness of dubbin on the stitching may attract fine grit that will abrade the stitching but that is true of any greasy coating.
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AFANASIEW

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Re: Anyone use Dubbin?
« Reply #9 on: 14:43:58, 27/11/18 »

Something of an urban myth now  I believe.
A topic for debate, certainly, e.g. here. Perhaps not worth the risk if you're unsure whether your boots' stitching is synthetic, particularly with so many more advanced products now available.
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ninthace

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Re: Anyone use Dubbin?
« Reply #10 on: 15:14:42, 27/11/18 »
A topic for debate, certainly, e.g. here. Perhaps not worth the risk if you're unsure whether your boots' stitching is synthetic, particularly with so many more advanced products now available.
I also found quite a few threads from that time (2007) and before.  Dubbin comes from the old verb dub meaning to dress leather by rubbing.  Thus anything used for this purpose was called dubbin and the ingredients of dubbin are not standard.  In the good old days (when I was a lad) it was basically lard or tallow but the modern stuff is very different even though it has retained the name to indicate its purpose.  Cheery Blossom, Kiwi, Mountain Warehouse, Dr Marten to name but 4 sell their own brand of dubbin.  I would be very surprised if any of it rotted stitching.
I can only find old threads discussing the idea that it might happen and so far I have not found anyone reporting it actually has happened.  As a boy I used to put dubbin on my football boots and even then, when the stitching may well have been cotton, the stitching stayed solid.
Equally, I have had boots where the stitching has given out and, had they been treated with dubbin, perhaps I would have blamed that but I haven't used it for over 50 years.
« Last Edit: 15:25:35, 27/11/18 by ninthace »
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AFANASIEW

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Re: Anyone use Dubbin?
« Reply #11 on: 15:27:58, 27/11/18 »
As a boy I used to put dubbin on my football boots...
Me too. Did you hammer your replacement leather studs in?
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ninthace

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Re: Anyone use Dubbin?
« Reply #12 on: 15:41:06, 27/11/18 »
Me too. Did you hammer your replacement leather studs in?
I did.  And do you remember the joy of the ends of the nails coming through the sole of your boot because the leather wore down quicker than the nails.  We were tough then!
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AFANASIEW

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Re: Anyone use Dubbin?
« Reply #13 on: 15:43:43, 27/11/18 »
I did.  And do you remember the joy of the ends of the nails coming through the sole of your boot because the leather wore down quicker than the nails.  We were tough then!
Yes. And any tendencies to forgetfulness now are obviously attributable to heading that sodden leather ball!
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ninthace

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Re: Anyone use Dubbin?
« Reply #14 on: 17:19:57, 27/11/18 »
Yes. And any tendencies to forgetfulness now are obviously attributable to heading that sodden leather ball!
  I suspect that may be the reason why to this day I cannot abide football. If it comes on the TV the channel gets changed or it goes off, even applies to the sports section on the news.
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