Author Topic: Now heavy is your pack for one night?  (Read 1595 times)

fernman

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Re: Now heavy is your pack for one night?
« Reply #15 on: 09:03:30, 28/11/18 »
I do weigh my self before and after most hikes.  I find it very useful for checking I am not dehydrated. 

I don't think there's much point in weighing yourself before and after a walk. You'd expect to lose a pound or so from the prolonged exercise - on my multiple-day trips I find I can tighten my belt a bit on the 2nd or 3rd day (it's infinitely adjustable, not one with holes an inch apart!) - on the other hand you're burning off fat and increasing muscle, and I've been given to understand that muscle weighs more than fat.

The colour of your pee is the best indicator of whether you're dehydrated or not.

Innominate Man

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Re: Now heavy is your pack for one night?
« Reply #16 on: 10:53:52, 28/11/18 »

The colour of your pee is the best indicator of whether you're dehydrated or not.


And if it's the colour of Lucozade you are too late and already dehydrated and need to get fluids on-board.
Only a hill but all of life to me,
Up there, between the sunset and the sea.  Geoffrey Winthrop Young.

alan de enfield

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Re: Now heavy is your pack for one night?
« Reply #17 on: 11:36:34, 28/11/18 »

Iím a fit and strong 60 year old.



I'm a tad older than you, a bit over weight (but its 'going down') and walk between 3 & 10 miles most days to keep the Diabetes and High Cholesterol in check.


On longer 'jaunts' I have no difference between a 1-night pack and a 3-night pack except maybe 1 days extra rations.
What I need for 3 nights is pretty much the same as 1-night.


Includes tent, sleeping bag, footprint, sleeping pad/mattress, all cooking equipment, 3 days food, clothes, GPS, VHF Transceiver, washing kit, bits & bobs etc etc.


Carry about 1 days water and a Sawyer filter (or water troughs, pubs, farms etc) for refills.


1-change of clothes is generally sufficient for 1 night or 3 nights.


The only differences are Summer-Pack and Winter-Pack where the Winter pack carries additional gas and thicker / warmer clothes.


Summer Pack weighs just under 10kg and fits into a 25 Litre Pack
Winter pack currently weighs 13.5kg and is in my 65 Litre pack, (but only half fills it - leaving room for additional woolies if necessary..)


If I was spending a few days 'in the high mountains' in the Winter I'd be adding considerably to the weight with additional 'stuff'.

gunwharfman

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Re: Now heavy is your pack for one night?
« Reply #18 on: 13:55:49, 28/11/18 »
I've forgotton! I don't weigh my pack anymore, I have now perfected (almost) what my weight will be, its as light as I can get it! I could still strive for lighter stuff but then I say to myself, whats the point, why spend out the money! Even if I shaved off an ounce or two I'm sure I wouldn't notice it anyway.

alan de enfield

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Re: Now heavy is your pack for one night?
« Reply #19 on: 14:24:09, 28/11/18 »
I've forgotton! I don't weigh my pack anymore, I have now perfected (almost) what my weight will be, its as light as I can get it! I could still strive for lighter stuff but then I say to myself, whats the point, why spend out the money! Even if I shaved off an ounce or two I'm sure I wouldn't notice it anyway.



Exactly - changing out an 2kg sleeping bag for a 800g one has a big weight saving, 500g (1lb) saving on my mattress etc etc. all adds up but - the law of 'diminishing returns' soon comes into play.
Spending another £100 to save 50g doesn't 'stack-up'


I now have pretty much the same level of equipment in my 13kg / 30lb pack as I had in my 18kg / 40lb pack but to make any further weight savings would cost a fortune and would give very little weight reduction. I'm happy with the weight I have so I'll stick with it.

Owen

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Re: Now heavy is your pack for one night?
« Reply #20 on: 14:26:52, 28/11/18 »
Weighing your kit as it goes in your sack is a good way of sorting out what you really need and what you can live without. If you're taking things like stake and potatoes maybe you might like to look at some simpler one pot type meals. This will cut down on the weight of ingredients and cooking kit. You don't have to go to the horrors of freeze dry meals for one or two nighter's this book https://www.amazon.co.uk/Moveable-Feasts-What-great-outdoors/dp/1852845341/ref=sr_1_14?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1543414871&sr=1-14&keywords=moveable+feast offeres some good ideas.   

taxino8

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Re: Now heavy is your pack for one night?
« Reply #21 on: 17:22:41, 28/11/18 »
Weighing your kit as it goes in your sack is a good way of sorting out what you really need and what you can live without. If you're taking things like stake and potatoes maybe you might like to look at some simpler one pot type meals. This will cut down on the weight of ingredients and cooking kit. You don't have to go to the horrors of freeze dry meals for one or two nighter's this book https://www.amazon.co.uk/Moveable-Feasts-What-great-outdoors/dp/1852845341/ref=sr_1_14?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1543414871&sr=1-14&keywords=moveable+feast offeres some good ideas.   
Thanks, Iíve already sourced some boil in the bag meals, Army ration packs to be exact and they have improved a lot since my Army dayís.
Iíve also just bought an Alpkit Titanium pot to boil them in.
Cheers
Bob

beefy

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Re: Now heavy is your pack for one night?
« Reply #22 on: 17:42:03, 28/11/18 »


Iíve also just bought an Alpkit Titanium pot to boil them in.
Cheers
Bob

Don't buy an Alpkit Koro stove whatever you do  :o
See here


http://www.walkingforum.co.uk/index.php?topic=30901.0
DRIP COFFINS  :D

taxino8

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Re: Now heavy is your pack for one night?
« Reply #23 on: 18:36:00, 28/11/18 »
Don't buy an Alpkit Koro stove whatever you do  :o
See here


http://www.walkingforum.co.uk/index.php?topic=30901.0
Iíve already got a couple from my carp fishing days, a Primus Omnifuel, which is a bit heavy but very powerful when used with Coleman fuel but also can use gas cartridges and another small gas one of similar design, probably a Primus as well but I canít remember the model.

Maggot

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Re: Now heavy is your pack for one night?
« Reply #24 on: 20:20:38, 28/11/18 »
35kg?  77lbs!   :o




I reckon I would be looking at about 5kg for a tolerable night, 10kg for a comfy night and 20kg for a very relaxed weekend.





Bigfoot_Mike

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Re: Now heavy is your pack for one night?
« Reply #25 on: 20:32:56, 28/11/18 »
25kg or so kept me going for 2 weeks hiking and camping in the Alps and that was in olden days before lightweight existed. I donít know how to pack light and am impressed that you managed to pack 35kg (and carry it). I donít worry too much about the weight of my pack. The easiest way for me to shed a few kilos for a hike would be to eat less for a week or so.

jimbob

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Re: Now heavy is your pack for one night?
« Reply #26 on: 23:36:31, 28/11/18 »
The easiest way for me to shed a few kilos for a hike would be to eat less for a week or so.
COR  please do pass on your diet plan in a separate thread. That would be some serious weight loss. For a normal moderately overweight male to lose  kiloS  in a week would mean an intake of zero calories with a huge amount of exercise. :)
Seriously I get where you're at. Getting the weight off was the reason I got back into walking.  I was told to try and walk at least 4 miles per day, which I do.  I also do longer walks now purely for enjoyment. Getting the weight off my belly has made walking easier  as time goes on. I carry the least weight I possibly can on my back but have reduced my body weight by a lot more than any reduction in pack weight.
Too little, too late, too bad......

richardh1905

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Re: Now heavy is your pack for one night?
« Reply #27 on: 08:20:38, 29/11/18 »

35kg?


You run the risk of injury carrying that much, in my opinion. I once carried two foam fire extinguishers each weighing 14kg up a hill to a lighthouse - nearly crippled me despite using one of the best heavy load carrying frames available (Tatonka Lastenkraxe). I struggled to put on the pack and stand up - never again!


As for what weight I carry for an overnighter - on a solo trip into the Cairngorms last summer my load was 11.0 kg. This didn't impede me when climbing a long steep heather clad slope, but DID throw me off balance somewhat when I was descending steep trackless ground.

richardh1905

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Re: Now heavy is your pack for one night?
« Reply #28 on: 08:22:19, 29/11/18 »

On my next short summer trip I'm going to ditch the stove and pans altogether, and just have oatcakes, cheese, kabanos, cereal bars etc.


The stove comes with me in winter though!

taxino8

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Re: Now heavy is your pack for one night?
« Reply #29 on: 08:51:06, 29/11/18 »
35kg?


You run the risk of injury carrying that much, in my opinion. I once carried two foam fire extinguishers each weighing 14kg up a hill to a lighthouse - nearly crippled me despite using one of the best heavy load carrying frames available (Tatonka Lastenkraxe). I struggled to put on the pack and stand up - never again!


As for what weight I carry for an overnighter - on a solo trip into the Cairngorms last summer my load was 11.0 kg. This didn't impede me when climbing a long steep heather clad slope, but DID throw me off balance somewhat when I was descending steep trackless ground.
I did get bad blisters on my heels, Iíve done a lot of day walking and never had those before and I reckon it was because of the weight.
We still managed to pitch up at Sprinkling Tarn, dump most of our kit and then go up Scafell Pike (which was in cloud yet again so no views).