Author Topic: The cow discussion........ again  (Read 2008 times)

dittzzy

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The cow discussion........ again
« on: 21:40:52, 01/12/18 »
OK, so you need a facebook account to view this video, but .......  Really good advice.  (If anyone can find another non facebook link to it, please add)
https://www.facebook.com/FarmersGuardian/videos/579127269184471/UzpfSTEwMDAwMTY1ODYxNjMxMToyMTM5MjMwNDQyODA4ODg5/

BuzyG

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Re: The cow discussion........ again
« Reply #1 on: 22:16:17, 01/12/18 »
Sound advice. Just walk past them and ignore them works fine. O0

happyhiker

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Re: The cow discussion........ again
« Reply #2 on: 10:46:54, 02/12/18 »
Thanks for this which I have shared on Twitter, because lots of walkers are terrified of cows. I too have found if you just walk slowly and quietly through the field, they ignore you. However, I would add that it pays to give any cow with calf a wide berth. This is the only time a cow has made a threatening move towards me., when I got too close. Also, never get between a cow and its calf.


I find horses much scarier!

barewirewalker

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Re: The cow discussion........ again
« Reply #3 on: 13:05:07, 02/12/18 »
Looks to be all young stock, Bullocks and Heifers, although I don't have a FB a/c so only saw a third without sound. Hereford crosses, charollais and friesians, it's mature Limousins with calf at foot that I try to watch out for. The single suckler herd and if they are more remote from the farm buildings so the human contact is less frequent are worthwhile observations to add to warning signs.
« Last Edit: 13:08:13, 02/12/18 by barewirewalker »
BWW
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Bigfoot_Mike

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Re: The cow discussion........ again
« Reply #4 on: 14:03:46, 02/12/18 »
My wife and I came across a few bovines on a walk from near Achgarve to Slaggan (a now defunct hamlet at the north eastern end of Loch Ewe with a great beach- sometimes complete with cows). On the return leg we found the track blocked by two highland cows and a bull. To stay on the track we would have had to walk right through the middle of them and pass within two feet of their huge horns. Perhaps we would have been fine, but I decided not to take a chance, so we crossed a ditch and I hauled my wife up a steep heathery bank. We, thus, avoided the beasts, which did appear to take some interest in us. Another cow started descending the hill, apparently towards us, but we made it back to the start of the walk without further incident.


A couple of years ago on the Applecross peninsula, we saw a family of Japanese tourists with young children so keen to get a photograph of some highland cows at the side of the road that they were standing right amongst them. It was pretty much like paparazzi with cameras being shoved into hairy faces. There were calves in the herd, so that was a risk I wouldnít take. I remember many years ago a tourist was killed by a highland cow at Plockton, as he managed to get between her and the calf.

sussamb

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Re: The cow discussion........ again
« Reply #5 on: 14:39:41, 02/12/18 »
However, I would add that it pays to give any cow with calf a wide berth. This is the only time a cow has made a threatening move towards me., when I got too close. Also, never get between a cow and its calf.


Yep, only time a cow has chased me was when one was with a calf and although I thought I'd given them a wide enough berth mum thought otherwise!
Where there's a will ...

barewirewalker

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Re: The cow discussion........ again
« Reply #6 on: 15:50:18, 02/12/18 »
There are points missing that disturb me about this video, with the reservation that not having a fb a/c I do not know if the farmer's guardian have made other material of this nature. What is missing from it.
There is breed differential in temperament, this was recognised years ago when the legislation was framed about bulls and dairy breeds, this has not been revised, with the importation of many continental and other breeds, especially in relation to dual purpose breeds.

This leads to the need for more individual risk assessment, which would require stockmen posting information about the stock in the field, where there is a public right of way. So admitting to risk can be offset by assessing the risk and providing the means to minimize the danger.

Secondly, the need to provide secondary ways. Because of the CLA's position on allowing access, the suggestion that secondary ways is tantamount to admitting that landowners should offer voluntary routes across land.
By showing Y/stock they have shown only the obvious way that most are intimidated by inquisitive animals and how by turning on the herd their charge is immediately stopped, the greater underlying dangers are not admitted to, though these are extremely rare (probably), it is a recognition of the signs that they are there which would save lives. But by admitting to them, would demonstrate the state of denial.




BWW
Their Land is in Our Country.

gunwharfman

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Re: The cow discussion........ again
« Reply #7 on: 17:08:08, 02/12/18 »
I got between a cow and a calf in 2015 and she charged, biffed me straight in the chest and I ended up in a field about 6 or 7 feet down a grassy bank on my back like a turtle! She didn't follow through luckingly and I lived to tell the tale!

Murphy

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Re: The cow discussion........ again
« Reply #8 on: 07:44:30, 03/12/18 »
"Sound advice. Just walk past them and ignore them works fine"[/size]

[/size]
I would say, yes most of the time, but there is a caveat - do not be fooled, and don't create a false sense of security.[/size]
This topic as the title suggests "Cow Discussion - again." comes up often, is discussed in other forums and walking mags
and the advice is always the same - wide berth.  Speaking as one who has been seriously injured by cattle and an experienced walker
walking past them and ignoring them does not always work fine. 

Lakeland Lorry

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Re: The cow discussion........ again
« Reply #9 on: 07:59:12, 03/12/18 »
I've been chased by cows, with and without calves in the herd, a few times and now I give them a wide berth.   


Myself and a friend even ended up jumping in a river to get away from two young frisky cows (bullocks, or whatever they were) that charged us.   Shouting loudly at the cows, whilst holding up a pair of walking poles to make ourselves look bigger, didn't stop the thing from going for us, so our only escape was the river.


There are some interesting stories of incidences with cows on this website:


https://killercows.co.uk/




ninthace

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Re: The cow discussion........ again
« Reply #10 on: 09:12:19, 03/12/18 »
Mrs N is sometimes attacked by cows but Iím not. The odd thing is it happens when we are out walking together and usually involves young cows or bullocks.   I say they are curious or boisterous, she says they are attacking and would run away if I didnít stop her. With cows and calves, I say that mum is keeping an eye on us, she says she is about to launch an attack and we need to retreat.  Either way it usually ends in acrimony for at least another field while we argue who was right.
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pauldawes

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Re: The cow discussion........ again
« Reply #11 on: 09:56:04, 03/12/18 »
One of those areas where I'm more cautious than i used to be.


Yes, we (nearly) all know that the standard package of advice ("keep calm, walk slowly, don't come between cow and calf, etc, etc) works 99.99% of the time.


Great odds...if you're not the one in 10,000 that gets the serious injury.


I think some of the "modern" breeds are a wee bit more aggressive than in days of yore. And generally...any large animal, even farm animals..are potentially dangerous.


Its not effected my walking to any real extent, but if walking a new area I do come across a field with large animals in I'll probably have a quick scan to see if any sensible route can avoid them completely, quick exit points if I go into field, etc.

Lakeland Lorry

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Re: The cow discussion........ again
« Reply #12 on: 11:16:32, 03/12/18 »
The following has just popped up on my FB page:


Fatal injuries in agriculture, forestry and fishing in Great Britain 2017/18

Being injured by cattle is the biggest killer in agriculture.


http://www.hse.gov.uk/agriculture/resources/fatal.htm?fbclid=IwAR1-6BIdfZQA4i5DTK1RwJsX6WIxcFS5A3OQvVViMwVv7FibPjJ6RfPgAaU




ninthace

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Re: The cow discussion........ again
« Reply #13 on: 11:39:17, 03/12/18 »
The following has just popped up on my FB page:


Fatal injuries in agriculture, forestry and fishing in Great Britain 2017/18
Being injured by cattle is the biggest killer in agriculture.


http://www.hse.gov.uk/agriculture/resources/fatal.htm?fbclid=IwAR1-6BIdfZQA4i5DTK1RwJsX6WIxcFS5A3OQvVViMwVv7FibPjJ6RfPgAaU


This report covers agriculture, forestry and fishing.
A total of 8 people were killed, 5 by cattle and 3 by bulls.  Most of these are agricultural workers rather than the general public.  4 members of the public were killed in the last year, 2 adults, 2 children - this is from all causes in agriculture, forestry and fishing.   In the longer term, over a five year period, moving machinery is the major cause of death, livestock are the second cause.
Given the numbers of the public out walking, staying on or visiting farms or enjoying the countryside, I reckon getting to your walk and just walking are probably far more risky than an encounter with a cow.
Solvitur Ambulando

April

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Re: The cow discussion........ again
« Reply #14 on: 13:37:46, 03/12/18 »
Speaking as one who has been seriously injured by cattle and an experienced walker walking past them and ignoring them does not always work fine.

I hope you have recovered now Murphy  :(

I totally agree with what you say about ignoring them does not always work fine.

I've been chased by cows, with and without calves in the herd

I/we have been chased by cattle, except never with calves in the herd. The last time we only just managed to get over a stile before charging, roaring bullocks reached it. They would have hit us, I have no doubt about that.  I know the difference between curious cattle and aggressive cattle; I have over 40 years experience walking through fields of cattle, most of the time they have no interest in you, sometimes they are a bit curious, very occasionally they can be very aggressive.

I don't like the implied nuance in the video (and in some of the comments on here!) that any incident is likely to be the walkers fault/perception and not the cow/bullocks fault. I echo Paul Dawes' comments, 99.9% of the time you can pass cattle with no incident but there are other times when people get seriously injured - and it is not their fault! Perhaps the man in the video should make a video about how to deal with aggressive cattle that are on the attack?
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