Author Topic: Gaiters that cover the whole boot?  (Read 607 times)

Doddy

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Re: Gaiters that cover the whole boot?
« Reply #15 on: 21:09:58, 05/12/18 »
I wear ZPacks Vertice rain gaiters that cover most of the shoe/boot very light too.

Maggot

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Re: Gaiters that cover the whole boot?
« Reply #16 on: 22:18:54, 05/12/18 »
Clearly Maggot you are a joker.
You didn't mention your welly rash.  :D Those who grew up in wellies have a horror of that particular blight.


But linings and footbeds have changed completely from the 5 pairs you would have had as a kid. 


A nice pair of neoprene or leather lined, deep lugged bad boys, and you will never look back!  Have a look at these things of beauty  http://www.thewellyshop.com/le-chameau-chasseur-rubber-boots-italian-leather-lined-wellingtons-full-length-zip.html?___SID=U   :P

rockhopper353

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Re: Gaiters that cover the whole boot?
« Reply #17 on: 21:21:35, 06/12/18 »
I find it hard to get gaiters large enough to cover my long calves and size 13 boots.


These work great for me, fit the bottom row of my laces and generally keep the water out, even when swiftly fording streams. O0


https://www.trespass.com/nanuk-performance-gaiters?gclid=EAIaIQobChMI4-ThubGH3wIVzL3tCh3n3ggNEAQYAiABEgJgAvD_BwE#color=Black&size=L/XL


I'll bare these in mind when I purchase some gaiters as I have size 13 feet as well. Never even came into my head that fitting gaiters could be an issue.

Dyffryn Ardudwy

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Re: Gaiters that cover the whole boot?
« Reply #18 on: 11:29:36, 07/12/18 »
Berghaus Yetis, but they were specifically designed for high altitude climbing, where the climbers wore plastic pebax shell boots, and wanted a gaiter that totally enveloped their boots, stopping the snow and water.
You could invest in full winter 4 season boots ,with a stiffened sole, but their hardly suitable for year round use.
It was a shame Berghaus did not develop a yeti gaiter for all round use, but the way they were designed would mean they would not fit a flexible boot.
I recon Berghaus must hold the sole copyright for the idea, as only one or two other company's have been allowed to copy the idea for a wider market, which is a real shame, as they are superb in keeping lots of mud and water away from the inside of your boots, and as we all know, thats a necessity in the warmer months.


« Last Edit: 11:36:52, 07/12/18 by Dyffryn Ardudwy »

the aged plodder

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Re: Gaiters that cover the whole boot?
« Reply #19 on: 17:17:44, 07/12/18 »
There was a chap on the old Outdoor Magic board who had superglued a pair of boots into Berghaus Yetis to avoid the struggle getting them on (he said). I can't really imagine that was any easier.
I have a theory that the cheapest 10 Millets gaiters suffice for most situations - long dew-sodden grass, deeper than expected puddles, dashing through lesser streams. They get warm - sometimes that's a plus! - but as I tend to kick mine to pieces over a couple of years 10 does the job.
There are great things to do and fine sights to be seen
Before we go to Paradise by way of Kensal Green.

archaeoroutes

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Re: Gaiters that cover the whole boot?
« Reply #20 on: 15:45:36, 08/12/18 »
The design may have changed now, but I remember years ago (1990s) an outdoor shop assistant demonstrating how to fit those. It took him about 10 minutes to get one of them on and I really thought he was about to burst a blood vessel. With a deep red face and panting like hell, he was straining with all his might to get the edge of the gaiter over the end of the boot and into the recess - and that was with the boot on his lap, not on his foot.


Everyone I've known who used Yeti gaiters left them on the boots. One even superglued (or perhaps it was inner tyre glue) them on - bottom edge of gaiter to rand of boot. These were mostly serious bog-trotters.
Walking routes visiting ancient sites in Britain's uplands: http://www.archaeoroutes.co.uk