Author Topic: Pennine way  (Read 3011 times)

Hillhiker1

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Pennine way
« on: 21:48:22, 05/01/19 »

Can anyone recommend a good guide book for the PW? I've done a fair few bits of it over the years, more by default than planning. But a mate and I are thinking of doing more of it as days out and weekends away, with a view to doing the whole thing in our retirement.
SO. Any recommendations for a guide?

alan de enfield

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Re: Pennine way
« Reply #1 on: 22:04:47, 05/01/19 »
Can anyone recommend a good guide book for the PW? I've done a fair few bits of it over the years, more by default than planning. But a mate and I are thinking of doing more of it as days out and weekends away, with a view to doing the whole thing in our retirement.
SO. Any recommendations for a guide?



This is the one I used (obviously supported by OS maps)



https://www.ordnancesurvey.co.uk/shop/books/other-walking-guidebooks/guidebook-pennine-way-companion.html?awc=2495_1546725837_2aec1c54a051fd4f3fdaaca5e019b087




https://www.worldofbooks.com/en-gb/rare-books/a-wainwright/pennine-way-companion-a-pictorial-guide/1541180593HJG?gclid=CjwKCAiAyMHhBRBIEiwAkGN6fLQO2TANOs-w0c36FMaT75HyQUk50f6WLiE1edZODU4s0T_LxT8aDRoC_IMQAvD_BwE

rural roamer

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Re: Pennine way
« Reply #2 on: 22:25:26, 05/01/19 »
We used the Trailblazers guide and can recommend it.

jimbob

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Re: Pennine way
« Reply #3 on: 00:12:26, 06/01/19 »
We used the Trailblazers guide and can recommend it.
+1 for Trailblazers.
Too little, too late, too bad......

sussamb

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Re: Pennine way
« Reply #4 on: 08:32:14, 06/01/19 »
I used the Cicerone guide when I first did it, and read lots of blogs
Where there's a will ...

harland

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Re: Pennine way
« Reply #5 on: 08:39:23, 06/01/19 »
For those with less experience than Hillhiker guides are OK as long as you are on the route but you will need a map (and compass) if you happen to be exploring elsewhere by mistake.

However to answer the question Trailblazer is very good together with OS Maps (or scanned copies of the part that you need).  My local library has all the OS Maps that can be borrowed which is very helpful taking into account my previous sentence!

gunwharfman

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Re: Pennine way
« Reply #6 on: 10:13:53, 06/01/19 »
I never bought a guide, just read and took notes from the internet. Its easy now, If I'm hiking anywhere I just use my phone (just need a signal) when I want to check out information near or ahead of me, including weather.

When I first did the PW I bought the Harvey Maps, which were fine, although for me, being colour blind (red/green) I could not read them at all in artificial light, e.g. in a pub, just a blur!

I have since bought the A to Z OS booklet maps which I think are great, A5 sized, very much an improvement on the Harvey maps and for me perfect, I can read them in all lights.

Stube

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Re: Pennine way
« Reply #7 on: 11:19:00, 06/01/19 »
Again +1 for the Trailblazer guides - nothing else comes close for their breadth of coverage.

However, if you regularly go off-route - as I do - then they should be coupled with the A-Z Adventure series maps. Two booklets cover the complete route & and have indices covering placenames and facilities.

That said, the PW is well waymarked - it's difficult to get lost unless it's foggy!

The revised Wainwright's guide is good for giving an impression of the route and the sights along the way with its numerous drawings. Little information on accommodation though.

bricam2096

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Re: Pennine way
« Reply #8 on: 11:58:46, 06/01/19 »
I found the Trailblazer guide to be very useful, you can usually pick them up pretty cheap on Ebay, especially the older editions as the route hasn't changed a lot over the years and the PW is quite well waymarked although some of the markers could do with being updated.

Don't rely on guidebooks for accommodation as places come and go, sometimes it's better to work out an itinerary and then search online for accommodation there or nearby (some B&Bs will offer transport). There were quite a few YHAs on/near the PW which I used on my PW to keep the cost down.

I also read many blogs and websites and picked up some tips that way e.g. shops, pubs and accommodation.

Best advice though is this forum as many people have done it so will be able to help or offer advice  O0
LDWs done - 31 in total including 15 National Trails and 3 C2C

Wainwrights 176
www.brians-walks.co.uk

harland

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Re: Pennine way
« Reply #9 on: 12:16:15, 06/01/19 »
Happy to provide details of my accommodation but that was in 2014 so there may be other members that have more up-to-date information.

Hillhiker1

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Re: Pennine way
« Reply #10 on: 16:03:08, 06/01/19 »

Thanks for all the replies guys, I think I'll have a look at the trailblazer guide to start then. O0
At this stage, I'm not after a navigation aid, I'll be using a GPS / Maps for that,  I'm just looking after a bit of armchair reading and research about the sights and general ground conditions really.
I got some Waterstones vouchers at Christmas and was going to buy a guide, but there's literally dozens to choose from, so I though I'd call in here first...


Thanks again :)
« Last Edit: 17:18:10, 06/01/19 by Hillhiker1 »

rural roamer

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Re: Pennine way
« Reply #11 on: 22:28:57, 07/01/19 »
Happy to provide details of my accommodation but that was in 2014 so there may be other members that have more up-to-date information.


We walked it in 2016. We found there were several B&Bs recently closed leaving some areas with little or no accommodation. As owners retire there is often no-one coming forward to take it on. Having said that when we did Offas Dyke in 2017 we did find 2 new places so may not always be bad news.

Yorkshiremarv

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Re: Pennine way
« Reply #12 on: 10:34:56, 09/01/19 »
I used the damian hall guide book, find it very useful. O.s maps for all the route, great descriptive on what to look out for along the way and every so often telling what direction to head in, useful distance checker to know what distances are between certain places. all the useful info on distance to travel in a day, elevation, highest point, public transport for the day, refreshments, public toilets, accommodation. The way is set out as in 16 day sections, which is helpful in planning your own journey, its the only thing i need along with a compass. Helped immensely on knock fell as it was 10m visibility in low cloud (along with wet and misted glasses),and after walking in a few directions and nothing feeling right i got the book out and read the description a few times about where i was and along with a compass bearing i eventually got on the right track. Also its the right size to fit into those zip up freezer bags so itll be safe and dry, even on the opened page for that section. O0
"if in doubt, flat out"

The Squirrel

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Re: Pennine way
« Reply #13 on: 14:02:06, 24/03/19 »
There is accommodation in Cowling, lodges, pods bunk house etc camping 150m off the pennine way, squirrel wood campsite, easy to find with everything you need including onsite bar, hot showers and a communal kitchen. There are NO B & B's left in the area this is the best option.




This is the one I used (obviously supported by OS maps)



The Squirrel

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Re: Pennine way
« Reply #14 on: 14:05:15, 24/03/19 »
most of the guide books are out of date, use internet search as no b&b's in Cowling anymore just the squirrel wood campsite and lodges also has a bunk house and bar