Author Topic: Boxing day hunt  (Read 2483 times)

April

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Re: Boxing day hunt
« Reply #30 on: 18:45:25, 08/01/19 »
Just a thought April.  The Lake District landscape is the product of animal farming.  If we all went veggie/vegan, what would happen to the countryside?

Oh  :o I've not heard this argument before  :o

Well only about a dozen times  ;)

Everyone going veggie/vegan is extremely unlikely so this isn't anything I spend time worrying about. There are some who would like the "woolly locusts" removed from the fells so "re-wilding" can happen. This has already happened in parts of the Lakes with areas of land being fenced off to keep sheep out. There is an ongoing debate about the rights and wrongs of how the landscape should be managed, me being a veggie or vegan isn't going to make a difference to what happens to it.

"Who would've thought...... you are light and darkness coming through" words by Tim Armstrong

mananddog

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Re: Boxing day hunt
« Reply #31 on: 08:32:15, 09/01/19 »

Back to the OP. As has been mentioned, the landowner can permit access. However, the hunts around here do not give a toss for permission. A local wood I am involved in and 5000 acres  of land has repeatedly asked the local hunt NOT to hunt there. The whole area was minced up by the hunt which had obviously been surrounding the wood and besieging it - this is not the action of a drag hunt. If it was a drag hunt they could avoid all the areas they are asked to keep out of but they do not. Make your own conclusions as to what they are doing.


The hunt was in my village yesterday so I went walking well away from them. I used to be able to check where both the Quorn and the Cottesmore were hunting and avoid them but the meets section has gone off line and is only available on a password protected site. I have been caught up in them when out on my MTB and being suddenly surrounded by 20 skittish horses when your head is at the perfect height for a lashing hoof is not nice. I even got hit in the face by a horse whip, not on purpose, the guy was not paying attention as I tried to overtake him and get out of the way, but he did not apologise.




phil1960

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Re: Boxing day hunt
« Reply #32 on: 13:35:06, 09/01/19 »
Well said, both of you  :)
Touching from a distance, further all the time.

inthebagbud

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Re: Boxing day hunt
« Reply #33 on: 06:22:47, 25/01/19 »
Going back to the OP try this document by Natural England Out in the Country that explains the different rights of way 


????://publications.naturalengland.org.uk/publication/9027


Where I have put ???? replace with http as I cant post links


Happy reading

barewirewalker

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Re: Boxing day hunt
« Reply #34 on: 11:23:07, 25/01/19 »
There country people, who long have family histories with hunting and there those amongst them, who resent the urban interference as well as those, who accept the need to move to a more publicly acceptable form of hunting, with a more humane way of controlling the fox population. It will take several generations to settle these differences.

Would it be good for walking and other access dependent activities if hound packs were disbanded altogether, I have mentioned in my previous post the advantages to the equine industry that the type of riding hunting offers is a valuable country pursuit?

But what could an active hunting (drag) liaison between all access users provide? HUNTING WICKETS !!!!!! much in decline now as hunts are struggling to finance themselves but the product of a willing partnership between landowner and the hunts. These provided access between holdings where there would not be field gates and were a form of limited public access, providing the means for children and the less proficient rider to follow, because farm boundary hedges were a continuous obstruction.

How valuable a bridge between urban and country understanding is there here. I accept that continued monitoring of hunting will need to go on for decades, but will the actual total demise of the hunt structure within our countryside be good?



BWW
Their Land is in Our Country.

roughyed

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Re: Boxing day hunt
« Reply #35 on: 20:50:32, 27/01/19 »
There country people, who long have family histories with hunting and there those amongst them, who resent the urban interference as well as those, who accept the need to move to a more publicly acceptable form of hunting, with a more humane way of controlling the fox population. It will take several generations to settle these differences.


If multiple hunts hadn't been caught rearing foxes with the sole intention of hunting them, then I'd have more sympathy with arguments of vermin control.  I mean why do drag hunts need terrier men?  Curious?

barewirewalker

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Re: Boxing day hunt
« Reply #36 on: 11:48:36, 29/01/19 »
The purpose of my post was to show that there is common ground between walking and hunting as both pursuits require access to the countryside. The traditional support for hunting will draw on people, who have a long family history and this will take generations to eradicate.

Rearing foxes for hunting suggest a shortage of foxes, with the polarization of arable and livestock, large areas are without any farm animals, which is not the situation where those farmers and stockmen are most concerned about the control of foxes.Hunting is a poor way of killing foxes but a good way to find foxes.

Walking in mid Wales I have met many farmers, who are avid fox hunters, but they hunt on foot. Here they are desperate to kill foxes because of lamb losses, during the lambing season on the hills. Question is; Is there a need to control foxes in certain areas and can that legitimately be carried out along side 'drag hunting'?
If the popular anti-hunt interference is too radical will it be counter productive in affecting access to our countryside?

After all this is a walking forum.
BWW
Their Land is in Our Country.

phil1960

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Re: Boxing day hunt
« Reply #37 on: 16:10:27, 29/01/19 »
I wasnt going to comment further on this having said my piece, but BWW does make a valid point in farmers removing foxes out of genuine concern for lambs by doing it on foot. Its the doing it for pleasure on horseback purely out of tradition that most people find abhorrent. Previously in this thread a toy or two got thrown out of the cot, but its an emotive issue and walkers do use the countryside too. I stand by original comment about drag hunting, but to answer BWWs question, do I think anti hunt interference is too radical and may somehow affect walkers access, no on both counts.
Touching from a distance, further all the time.