Author Topic: Brecon Becons in February  (Read 2501 times)

GinAndPlatonic

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Re: Brecon Becons in February
« Reply #45 on: 13:26:21, 04/02/19 »
I used to be in that frame of mind, when i saw fresh snow in the mountains, but Ive discovered traversing deep snow, is tiring and energy sapping, it almost spoils a great day in the hills.
Easy snow conditions of around a foot in depth, is OK, but last week i was in snow above my knees for around three miles, and it was a damn nuisance, and there was no escaping it, the snow was of this depth for miles around.
It turns what is usually an easy walk, into something far harder.
Had it not been for my friend wanting to try out a new pair of winter boots, i would have called it a day far earlier.
A walk of only around six miles felt like something over twenty.
;D ..I sometimes feel like you when hiking across wet, soggy newly ploughed fields..I`m never quite sure if It`s best to shake the huge gobs of mud off the soles of my boots every so often which in itself is tiring...or wait till chunks fall off because of it`s own sheer weight and the force of gravity.. :o

Bigfoot_Mike

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Re: Brecon Becons in February
« Reply #46 on: 19:35:45, 04/02/19 »
;D ..I sometimes feel like you when hiking across wet, soggy newly ploughed fields..I`m never quite sure if It`s best to shake the huge gobs of mud off the soles of my boots every so often which in itself is tiring...or wait till chunks fall off because of it`s own sheer weight and the force of gravity.. :o
Many years ago I was hiking from Marsden to Edale in January. The peat was extremely sticky and it took a great deal of effort to lift each boot out of the gloop. This got progressively worse as each boot acquired a huge platform heel of heavy, wet peat. Lifting this weight over the big tussocks was extremely tiring and not at all enjoyable.

GinAndPlatonic

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Re: Brecon Becons in February
« Reply #47 on: 20:30:40, 04/02/19 »
Many years ago I was hiking from Marsden to Edale in January. The peat was extremely sticky and it took a great deal of effort to lift each boot out of the gloop. This got progressively worse as each boot acquired a huge platform heel of heavy, wet peat. Lifting this weight over the big tussocks was extremely tiring and not at all enjoyable.
Tall tussocks of heavy grass is my pet hate...A big failing of mine, when planning a walk,  is I just vaguely take in what the effects of ascents/descents will be, but rarely acknowledge what the effects will be of the terrain...although I suppose its just not possible sometimes, until actually slogging across it, whatever it turns out to be..
Edit : I just noticed online that the  MRT rescued somebody off the main pathway up to Pen Y Fan yesterday
https://www.facebook.com/breconmountainrescue/videos/2223015858015471/
« Last Edit: 21:08:21, 04/02/19 by GinAndPlatonic »

BuzyG

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Re: Brecon Becons in February
« Reply #48 on: 21:18:12, 04/02/19 »
;D ..I sometimes feel like you when hiking across wet, soggy newly ploughed fields..I`m never quite sure if It`s best to shake the huge gobs of mud off the soles of my boots every so often which in itself is tiring...or wait till chunks fall off because of it`s own sheer weight and the force of gravity.. :o
Have to Agree.  After 17mles of tussocs and peat bogs, on a damp, gale assisted, trek around the Dartmoor 600s last weekend. 15 miles of snow and a similar amount of ascents, in the sun shine and lighter winds, was a dream come true.  O0