Author Topic: Stoves  (Read 4752 times)

sussamb

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Stoves
« on: 22:36:42, 19/01/19 »
Been a while since I carried a stove while walking but aiming to correct that shortly.  What's considered good at the moment? Oh, and not too expensive  ;)
Where there's a will ...

Pitboot

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Re: Stoves
« Reply #1 on: 06:24:33, 20/01/19 »
https://www.alpkit.com/products/kraku


There's an alcohol stove too.
If I should fall to rise no more,
As many comrades did before,
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Pitboot

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If I should fall to rise no more,
As many comrades did before,
Then ask the fifes and drums to play.
Over the hills and far away.

richardh1905

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Re: Stoves
« Reply #3 on: 07:49:45, 20/01/19 »
Do you want it just for a quick brew on a day walk, sussamb, or are you looking for something to cook on during a multiday long distance walk?

If the former, I would go for a spirit stove - weigh next to nothing and you can take a minimal amount of fuel. Take a look at speedsterstoves - very clever design, and they will manufacture a windshield/potstand specifically for your pot. I'm tempted to get one myself - lightweight, well designed, simple ... and cheap.

ninthace

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Re: Stoves
« Reply #4 on: 09:06:23, 20/01/19 »
If I want a hot drink on a day walk I use a vacuum flask. A lot less complicated.
Solvitur Ambulando

April

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Re: Stoves
« Reply #5 on: 09:33:00, 20/01/19 »
We like our msr pocket rocket 2.

https://www.msrgear.com/pocketrocket-2
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beefy

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Re: Stoves
« Reply #6 on: 09:39:12, 20/01/19 »
Whatever you do don't refill your gas cylinders  ;D


https://youtu.be/mi_GRcqmVfY
DRIP COFFINS  :D

sussamb

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Re: Stoves
« Reply #7 on: 10:36:39, 20/01/19 »
Thanks all. Yes, in the past I've taken a flask but now considering a stove for hot meals. Will have a look at all the suggestions  O0
Where there's a will ...

alan de enfield

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Re: Stoves
« Reply #8 on: 11:31:11, 20/01/19 »
Thanks all. Yes, in the past I've taken a flask but now considering a stove for hot meals. Will have a look at all the suggestions  O0



I think any recommendation will depend on 'fuel type' you want to use.
Are you wanting a specific fuel, or low weight, or quick 'boil', or low simmer, or low purchase price, or low running cost etc etc.


Gas - in my mind is the best all round. High power, controllable, clean
Solid fuel - (eg Hexamine) dirty and smelly. Low power, not controllable
Alcohol - light weight (except for the 'bottle of fuel') but will make clothes stink if bottle leaks. Reasonable power, not controllable
Wood - Cheap, needs collecting, low power, dirty, not very controllable.


Interesting view on Fuel differences here :


http://bushwalkingnsw.org.au/clubsites/FAQ/FAQ_Efficiency.htm




sussamb

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Re: Stoves
« Reply #9 on: 11:58:34, 20/01/19 »
Good point ... was thinking gas  O0
Where there's a will ...

forgotmyoldpassword

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Re: Stoves
« Reply #10 on: 12:16:50, 20/01/19 »
Quite like the Caldera Cone style alcohol setups.  There's something to be said for a silent flame burning away whilst you're relaxed which beats the jet-engine sound of gas.


That said when you get into 4-season use I prefer using a remote gas stove with a pre-heater element as it's less hassle - but for an English climate alcohol stoves go a long way.

zuludog

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Re: Stoves
« Reply #11 on: 13:16:34, 20/01/19 »
I'm guessing that you're not thinking of doing any major, serious, or very long backpacking trips; just a meal and a brew for a couple of days at a time
And that you don't want to spend hours searching and agonising over the absolute details.
In that case the simplest, cheapest, and easiest would be a screw- top cartridge gas stove. But if you are thinking of going in very cold weather a hose connected gas stove would be better

Have a look at Cotswold and Go Outdoors, either website or proper shop, they're as good as any; you might even find a deal that includes a pan or two

astaman

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Re: Stoves
« Reply #12 on: 13:30:31, 20/01/19 »
Meths: I use a Trangia Triangle. It as a basic windshield but I usually carry a foil one that came with my old MSR Whisperlight. I also carry a couple of Titanium tent pegs to act as a trivet if I want to use my mug, which is smaller than the pot stand of the stove, to heat water. When camping they also act as spare pegs. There are options that would shave off a few grams but not enough to make me want to change.


Gas: I use the smaller of the Vango models that fit on the top of the gas canister. Picked it up from Go Outdoors. G.O. sell their own titanium on I think which would be worth a look.


There are other options that are very similar and in my experience pretty much of a muchness.


These are my small lightweight options. On the larger side I have a Whisperlight International, a two-person Trangia and an embarrassing array of other gas stoves, meths and wood burning stoves built up over the years. They've all had their place and none were so bad as to put off using them.

alan de enfield

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Re: Stoves
« Reply #13 on: 16:05:50, 20/01/19 »
I'm guessing that you're not thinking of doing any major, serious, or very long backpacking trips; just a meal and a brew for a couple of days at a time
And that you don't want to spend hours searching and agonising over the absolute details.
In that case the simplest, cheapest, and easiest would be a screw- top cartridge gas stove. But if you are thinking of going in very cold weather a hose connected gas stove would be better

Have a look at Cotswold and Go Outdoors, either website or proper shop, they're as good as any; you might even find a deal that includes a pan or two



Agreed 100%


A 100/110 gram cartridge will boil about 8 litres of water and costs around 5-6, a 230g cartridge will cost a bit less and will boil twice as much water.


The 225/230/250g (depending on make) is the 'popular size' is normally cheaper then the 110g.The large volume production runs make them the most economical to buy. I think I paid just over 3 each for a box of 6 from Amazon.


The 'full-up' weight of a 110g cartridge is around 210g whilst the 230g cartridge is around 367g.


Add a 45g - 90g stove-top (depending on make) and you are all set up.


I bought a few of these during the 'price wars' (down to 99p inc P&P) and they work very well. Giving about 3KW.


https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/292874601734?ssPageName=STRK:MESINDXX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1436.l2649

Sonatine

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Re: Stoves
« Reply #14 on: 16:06:08, 20/01/19 »
There's Trangia Mini too, you get burner and holder as well as a small pan and a small non-stick frying pan.


If you go gas, I would get a large mug/pot, and boil directly in that.


Avoid wood burners, it sounds great in theory, but the practicalities of finding burnable material in our wet environment makes it unrealistic.