Author Topic: Stoves  (Read 4036 times)

Jim Parkin

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Re: Stoves
« Reply #30 on: 22:25:54, 23/01/19 »
There's Trangia Mini too, you get burner and holder as well as a small pan and a small non-stick frying pan.


If you go gas, I would get a large mug/pot, and boil directly in that.


Avoid wood burners, it sounds great in theory, but the practicalities of finding burnable material in our wet environment makes it unrealistic.
I have a Trangia Mini (also known as Trangia 28 - probably because those zany Swedes have larger numbers for smaller stoves) and it does indeed have a nice pot and pan, and a lightweight pan gripper.  However the potstand and supposed windshield is pretty rubbish as a windshield. 

Oudezijds Voorburgwal

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Re: Stoves
« Reply #31 on: 13:55:58, 25/01/19 »
 The jetboil looks really good for a quick brew, but are you so pressed for time as to justify that high price tag?
A few gas powered, extremely cheap alternatives



https://www.aliexpress.com/item/Outdoor-Portable-Folding-Mini-Camping-Stove-Gas-Stove-Survival-Oven-Stove-45g-Pocket-Picnic-Cooking-Gas/32969103139.html
https://www.aliexpress.com/item/Stainless-Steel-Dpower-Camping-Gas-powered-Stove-with-Piezo-Ignition-Europe-Japanese-Handheld-Folding-Portable-Dropshipping/32933826058.html
https://www.aliexpress.com/item/Portable-Outdoor-Cooker-Mini-Camping-Alloy-Stove-Outdoor-Gas-Stove-Survival-Furnace-Stove-Pocket-Picnic-Cooking/32949424078.html
Iíve got one similar to the second one, works fine



or more expensive outlay but cheapest to run



https://www.amazon.co.uk/Gasoline-Cooking-Camping-Portable-Lightweight/dp/B004HHWC44
Iíve had a Coleman dual fuel stove for more than twenty years now, itís hard to beat

I've got to amit, there's so much choice these days it must be hard to know where to start, there really was only Meths and CampingGaz (that I could afford) when I started LOL



 

Owen

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Re: Stoves
« Reply #32 on: 14:26:45, 25/01/19 »
This is what I use simple and reliable, https://www.cotswoldoutdoor.com/p/vango-vango-folding-stove-D3212143.html?colour=180
Takes about 2 minutes to boil a 750ml pan of water. I like the fact it's low so it's more stable than one that screws into the canister top. I use a foil windshield with it, stove weighs 220g, windshield 10g. A lot cheaper than a jetboiler. 

sussamb

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Re: Stoves
« Reply #33 on: 15:15:38, 25/01/19 »
Thanks, that's a useful idea
Where there's a will ...

Jim Parkin

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Re: Stoves
« Reply #34 on: 15:20:16, 25/01/19 »
The jetboil looks really good for a quick brew, but are you so pressed for time as to justify that high price tag?
A few gas powered, extremely cheap alternatives



https://www.aliexpress.com/item/Outdoor-Portable-Folding-Mini-Camping-Stove-Gas-Stove-Survival-Oven-Stove-45g-Pocket-Picnic-Cooking-Gas/32969103139.html
https://www.aliexpress.com/item/Stainless-Steel-Dpower-Camping-Gas-powered-Stove-with-Piezo-Ignition-Europe-Japanese-Handheld-Folding-Portable-Dropshipping/32933826058.html
https://www.aliexpress.com/item/Portable-Outdoor-Cooker-Mini-Camping-Alloy-Stove-Outdoor-Gas-Stove-Survival-Furnace-Stove-Pocket-Picnic-Cooking/32949424078.html
Iíve got one similar to the second one, works fine



or more expensive outlay but cheapest to run



https://www.amazon.co.uk/Gasoline-Cooking-Camping-Portable-Lightweight/dp/B004HHWC44
Iíve had a Coleman dual fuel stove for more than twenty years now, itís hard to beat

I've got to amit, there's so much choice these days it must be hard to know where to start, there really was only Meths and CampingGaz (that I could afford) when I started LOL
I had a Colman Peak 1 - but I am not familiar with the brand in the bottom loink for the gasoline stove.  I'm not sure I'd like an unknown brand with pressurised petrol - there's too much to go spectacularly wrong. 

Dyffryn Ardudwy

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Re: Stoves
« Reply #35 on: 19:48:14, 25/01/19 »
For general walking trips, other than possibly an attempt on a Long Distance Path, such as the Coast to Coast or Pennine Way, i still love the portability and usefulness of my JetBoil Zip.
It has the capabilities of doing some basic cooking, and can boil cold water , in around four minutes, and the flame  is fairly wind resistant as well.

For most of us, that will be sufficient.

Obviously if you plan more serious outings, lasting several day's or possibly weeks, then a more powerful and versatile  stove will be needed, but last night, i was watching the programme on the Parachute regiment, and lo and behold, i saw two of the officers who were going abroad on maneuvers, place a Jetboil in their kit.

If  members of the Paras finds the jetboil a decent addition to their kit, it must be worth consideration.

The gas canisters for the JetBoil are almost universally available across Europe, which is something worth considering.

Bought mine two years ago, and i like keeping it tucked away in my car boot in a sealed container.

Ive used it several times as well, easy to set up, with very little fuss, and very lightweight, and if you shop around, its available for around £40, which is what i paid for mine.


« Last Edit: 19:52:43, 25/01/19 by Dyffryn Ardudwy »

Owen

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Re: Stoves
« Reply #36 on: 12:47:10, 26/01/19 »
In my days in the Army there was only the old Camping Gaz bluey's available so many of us used them. just before deploying to the Falkland Islands we were told not to take them with us as there wouldn't be any replacement canisters. We all went back to using the old issued Hexamine cookers, these were smelly, dirty and unbelievably slow. I don't think I had any hot food for the first week after we landed. Just before returning home I was talking to an officer from the RAOC who told me that they had several containers full of gaz canisters but were surprised that no one had asked for them. The Army never was any good at getting it's left hand to talk to it's right.     

Nomad32

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Re: Stoves
« Reply #37 on: 02:01:53, 06/02/19 »
The jetboil stove is only good at what it does boiling water really quick. I'd go with an msr pocket rocket. Much more controllable and heats food without burning it. Just my two penorth

Ralph

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Re: Stoves
« Reply #38 on: 04:52:51, 06/02/19 »
When it comes to gas stoves for a canister mounted one I'd go with the Pocket Rocket, for a remote with pre heat tube I favour the Primus Express Spider, a great stove. I have recently purchased the Trangia Triangle for my meths burner but have not yet tried it.

WILDWALKINGUK

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Re: Stoves
« Reply #39 on: 11:43:41, 06/02/19 »
Hello
On long walks I take a Vargo alcohol/multi fuel stove because of possible failure of other stoves and meths/fuel tabs are so widely available.
This and weight is important on walks like the Cape Wrath Trail and the TGO Challenge when I used dehydrated meals the whole way on both and only resupplying once. I will be taking it with me on my LEJOG later this month. The weights are: Stove 30g, Windscreen and base 43g, Evernew Pot and lid 600ml 92g.   
The down side is slow boil times and its not controllable but neither is and issue to me as I only boil water for dehydrated meals and get more time to look at the views. 

Ralph

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Re: Stoves
« Reply #40 on: 11:55:55, 06/02/19 »
I find that in the last year or so I have gradually changed my mind with regards to fuel, I'm now leaning towards alcohol & bio gel for boiling water. There's no rush.

scott_allore

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Re: Stoves
« Reply #41 on: 19:38:54, 10/02/19 »
I've always gone back and forth between alcohol and an MSR pocket rocket.  The alcohol stove is a little more fun and also SILENT when burning, but affected by the wind a lot. The MSR is what I take when I think I might get in late, or have some adversity.  It lights right up and it's basically maintenance free.


I make my alcohol stoves, some great ways on YouTube to use only one soda or beer can.  It's essentially free to make and ultra, ultra light.

Jim Parkin

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Re: Stoves
« Reply #42 on: 21:05:59, 11/02/19 »

<snip>
The alcohol stove is a little more fun and also SILENT when burning, but affected by the wind a lot.
<snip>
Windshields are even more important with meths stoves than gas stoves in my experience. 

Ronin83

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Re: Stoves
« Reply #43 on: 18:49:59, 13/02/19 »
I bought this earlier in the year
https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/aw/d/B01MCYK20I?psc=1&ref=ppx_pop_mob_b_pd_title


Its the best of both worlds. Windproof and quick to boil, more sturdy than jetboil as gas is separate to the side, decent brand, big enough pot for proper cooking and not too expensive.


The msr windburner is, I guess, the posh version of jetboil

Stube

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Re: Stoves
« Reply #44 on: 21:52:26, 13/02/19 »
I've always rejected jetboil type solution because of the weight penalty - the supposed fuel savings are only overcome the additional weight if you're more than two weeks between resupply opportunities.

On both my PW & PBW trips I used an Alpkit kraku with a MYOG heat shield that enclosed both the burner and much of the pot. Efficient and safe when cooking inside a tent. A canister stabiliser/stand is good idea too.

The kraku is tiny with only a small span on the pot stand, so is only suitable for small pots - say half lire or less.

I find I get 15+ meals from a 230g canister. A meal is either breakfast (tea, boiled eggs & coffee for lunch in a flask) or dinner (soup, main course & coffee).

On other trips of similar length I've used pocket rocket clones or remote canister stoves. The later is noticeably less efficient.