Author Topic: Winter camping  (Read 1146 times)

topher83

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 26
Winter camping
« on: 16:50:56, 22/01/19 »
Hiya


Just wondering if there's anything to a 4 season tent or is it down to the sleeping bag


Was looking at possibly winter camping, got a good sleeping bag that's rated down to minus numbers
But the tent is some cheap 2 manner
Wasn't planning on going during a storm, so mainly the cold and moderate wind potentially


Does the quality of the tent greatly affect the inside temp?


Thanks

richardh1905

  • Veteran Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2126
Re: Winter camping
« Reply #1 on: 17:06:28, 22/01/19 »
I would say a tent season rating is mainly down to wind resistance. If you have a sheltered valley pitch in good conditions, and (important) pitch your tent well, then you'll get away with a cheapie - as long as a storm doesn't arrive unexpectedly, that is. If you are wild camping on the fells, then better get a decent tent.

Regarding inner temperature of the tent - tents with a lot of mesh built into the inner will be draughty, as will those with a big gap under the fly. I like tents that have controllable ventilation.

beefy

  • Veteran Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3090
Re: Winter camping
« Reply #2 on: 19:25:34, 22/01/19 »
Plus 1 as Richard  says O0
DRIP COFFINS  :D

karl h

  • Veteran Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1268
Re: Winter camping
« Reply #3 on: 19:33:35, 22/01/19 »
And plus 2 ;)
Also a good mat is just as important as a good bag, Down ones are best but expensive.  Cheaper ones with a foam mat underneath work ok in my experience
show your love for Lady Nature. And she will come back again.
www.karlswalks.co.uk

topher83

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 26
Re: Winter camping
« Reply #4 on: 19:59:01, 22/01/19 »
Didn't even know down mats were a thing  ???


Got a couple of 'classic' foam mats, plus a self inflating foam mat
Was jus gonna put a foam mat down then the self inflating one, should be warm enough


Cheers, just need to plan a day now  :)

beefy

  • Veteran Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3090
Re: Winter camping
« Reply #5 on: 20:55:12, 22/01/19 »
Post up a trip report with some pics
 O0
DRIP COFFINS  :D

humansnail

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 68
Re: Winter camping
« Reply #6 on: 22:36:52, 22/01/19 »
 I'm in a pretty similar position but w/ a 3 season tent (vango banshee). I was out camping in the cheviots last weekend, I think the forecast was about -3 ish. I used two roll mats (one thin, blue cheapo go outdoors one and a thicker, silver foil sided decathlon one) plus my three quarter length thermarest pro light and that was fine. Not even sure if I really needed two roll mats, but it wasn't a long walk so I thought I'd air on the side of caution.

 
I hope this isn't “hijacking” the thread (if it is, please just let me know and I'll start a different one) but a few questions last weekends trip threw up were (and hopefully any replies might be usefull to the original poster too):
1. What pegs do you use on cold/frozen/hard/lightly snow covered ground? My normal ones were bending and were very difficult to get in the ground.
2. When snow is too deep for the pegs to go in, what do you do? Do you carry a light weight shovel and dig down/move the snow until your pegs get in?
3. When doubling up sleeping bags how to you work out a rough temperature rating for the two combined? I used a Rab 500 (comfort 1 degrees C – my go to 3 season bag) and an oldish, heavy synthetic vango bag (comfort 0 degrees C – my old bag). I was pretty warm last weekend at -3. I'm planning to incrementally test this set up out to see how cold I'm comfortable at. However, the forecast isn't always right, so I am quite curious to know if there is some way of roughly working out the temp ratings of a doubled up sleeping bag system.

Thanks again!
HS


zuludog

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 122
Re: Winter camping
« Reply #7 on: 22:54:14, 22/01/19 »
Most tents would be OK in winter if at low level & sheltered. could add some extra guys
Foam mat & SIM & good s/bag should be OK. Wear spare clothes inside, eg microfleece top, long johns & socks kept dry just for sleeping
Keep gas cartridges in the s/bag with you when not in use
Fill pan with water at night, then if it freezes you just have to put it on the stove in the morning
Keep water bags & bottles in the inner tent as it's slightly warmer. Store them upside down so that if they freeze the ice does not form a plug at the neck
Can use water bladders and bottles as hot water bottles as long as the water is not nearly boiling. In the morning you will have lukewarm water and be well on your way to your first brew
Pull a body warmer or fleece jacket over the bottom of your sleeping bag; besides extra insulation it will protect the bag from damp & condensation from rubbing against the tent walls
Take more fuel than usual, to allow for extra brews or melting snow, or simply because the water will be starting at a lower temperature
Besides your usual food & drink take extra hot snacks that can be cooked with the minimum of fuel, like instant noodles, cup-a-soup, frankfurter sausages. Yes, I know they're junk, but you don't have to live off them for ever

If you need to melt snow, either start very gently, or put some water in the pan - because snow will soak up its own meltwater at first, leaving the pan dry, and it will burn
If you leave your tent with the gear in it, always put the s/bag in a waterproof bag - especially if you think your tent is a bit suspect
« Last Edit: 23:31:20, 22/01/19 by zuludog »

zuludog

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 122
Re: Winter camping
« Reply #8 on: 23:10:49, 22/01/19 »
HUMANSNAIL -

For frozen ground obviously bigger/stronger/longer pegs are what you really want. But one trick is to take one decent steel peg to make the hole, then remove it and put your other peg in the hole
Peg extractors are for wimps - if you've ever struggled with sore freezing hands to remove pegs you'll wish you had one. Or you could take a suitable loop of cord

For deep snow, scraping back to soil is the best - toilet trowel? Or you could make some sort of dead man by burying crampons or rocks; or use your ice axe and trekking poles. Or fill a stuff sac with snow and use that
 But if you get to that stage you're getting pretty serious

I think experience is the only way to estimate the insulation of combinations of mats & bags, but if in doubt, take it

richardh1905

  • Veteran Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2126
Re: Winter camping
« Reply #9 on: 07:31:33, 23/01/19 »

Some good tips there zuludog.


A spare tent peg makes a perfectly adequate peg extractor in my experience, Humansnail.

April

  • Veteran Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6753
Re: Winter camping
« Reply #10 on: 08:39:29, 23/01/19 »
Also a good mat is just as important as a good bag, Down ones are best but expensive.

Down is always best left on the bird it came from  ;)

Was jus gonna put a foam mat down then the self inflating one, should be warm enough

Yes, foam mat and thermarest pro does work, I use these.

Good tips from zuludog, never thought about putting a jacket or fleece over the bottom of the bag.

Reading all this has confirmed to me that I want to wait until it has warmed up a little bit before I go out camping  ;D Minus 5 here in north Cumbria atm.
"Who would've thought...... you are light and darkness coming through" words by Tim Armstrong

richardh1905

  • Veteran Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2126
Re: Winter camping
« Reply #11 on: 08:56:03, 23/01/19 »
Down is always best left on the bird it came from  ;)

Good tips from zuludog, never thought about putting a jacket or fleece over the bottom of the bag.



Inclined to agree about down.
I've often put my fleece over the bottom of my bag - or rather zipped it up and pulled it on over the bottom of the bag.

Owen

  • Veteran Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1274
Re: Winter camping
« Reply #12 on: 11:12:10, 23/01/19 »
I've some long plastic stacks about 18 in long and an "I" form about 1 X 1.5 in for camping in snow, I got them from a garden centre I think. I use them as deadmen of it's very deep otherwise just as normal pegs. When the weather's really bad skis make ideal anchorages.


I use an old 5 season (is there really such a thing) kerrimat under an old style full length thermarest.

richardh1905

  • Veteran Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2126
Re: Winter camping
« Reply #13 on: 18:13:47, 23/01/19 »
I use an old 5 season (is there really such a thing) kerrimat under an old style full length thermarest.



I remember them - but I went for the 4 season version. Still in use after 35 years!

KimE

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 193
Re: Winter camping
« Reply #14 on: 21:13:25, 23/01/19 »

Wintertents should have flysheet all the way to the ground so snow cant get blown under it. Some tents have stormflaps which you can pack snow on to get it tight. Tent poles a little thicker than on a summer tent ex. DAC 10mm. No you cant have it so much warmer on the inside of the tent because you need good ventilation to get moist out so it dont stays frosen on the inside. In a tipitent can you have a heater/stove or open fire.


Yes you can have 5 seasons the Samis have 8 tree of them are winter.


I use my spring-autumn tent even in the winter its not perfect but it works.