Author Topic: A sandwich by any other name....  (Read 1994 times)

Islandplodder

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A sandwich by any other name....
« on: 15:02:33, 23/01/19 »

A few of us were sitting on a hill eating our sandwiches and started discussing what we called our picnic.
The Scots among us said "piece".  A couple called it 'bait' and I thought I remembered 'snap' from my youth (in Yorkshire).  Someone said they had heard 'pack up'.
A picnic somehow involves a rug, and complicated cooking packed up in a hamper.  We were talking about the thing you take for a walk.
Any more regional variations?




ninthace

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Re: A sandwich by any other name....
« Reply #1 on: 16:22:55, 23/01/19 »
I have heard bait box and butty box.  I call it luncheon.
Solvitur Ambulando

GinAndPlatonic

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Re: A sandwich by any other name....
« Reply #2 on: 16:41:31, 23/01/19 »
I have always called it lunch, even though for me it is spread (pardon the pun) out, & often eaten throughout the day.. :P

Owen

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Re: A sandwich by any other name....
« Reply #3 on: 16:43:15, 23/01/19 »
Porky roundaboy tuck.

jimbob

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Re: A sandwich by any other name....
« Reply #4 on: 16:46:33, 23/01/19 »
+1 for bait,  carried ,of course, in a bait box which went into the bait bag.(North Northumberland )
Hereabouts in Lincolnshire I have heard it called a pack-up.
Too little, too late, too bad......

adalard

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Re: A sandwich by any other name....
« Reply #5 on: 18:33:46, 23/01/19 »
I think we usually just say butties... As in, "Shall we save the butties 'til we get to those rocks over there?" or the like.

vghikers

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Re: A sandwich by any other name....
« Reply #6 on: 19:57:15, 23/01/19 »
In the Potteries of Stoke-on-Trent, sandwiches were often called 'pieces', as in 'a piece of jam' = a jam butty.
A common general term for your packed lunch, sandwiches or otherwise, was your 'snapping'.

Innominate Man

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Re: A sandwich by any other name....
« Reply #7 on: 20:09:10, 23/01/19 »
I have a 'leg' of the family from South Yorkshire and as well as snap, I've heard 'jock' used.
I think the miners used to take a jock tin darn pit !


The term 'pack up' is always used by Mrs I. She is from a more urban area of West Yorkshire (  :knuppel2:  ) and it is purely a term for snap and not a full blown picnic.
On the other hand I'm from very West Yorkshire (i.e. not central West Yorkshire - there is a difference): Calderdale - and we were so poor, we didn't have any snap/jock/shim shams/pack up/luncheon/bait or piece   ;D  Luxury !
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Pitboot

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Re: A sandwich by any other name....
« Reply #8 on: 20:54:54, 23/01/19 »
Scran. Don't know if the Bootnecks claim that one but in my service years from 1973 this is the term we used for a meal or snack taken in the field. You don't take a hamper in a tank or helicopter, well officers might but not us troopers.
If I should fall to rise no more,
As many comrades did before,
Then ask the fifes and drums to play.
Over the hills and far away.

Pitboot

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Re: A sandwich by any other name....
« Reply #9 on: 20:56:34, 23/01/19 »
I have a 'leg' of the family from South Yorkshire and as well as snap, I've heard 'jock' used.
I think the miners used to take a jock tin darn pit !


The term 'pack up' is always used by Mrs I. She is from a more urban area of West Yorkshire (  :knuppel2:  ) and it is purely a term for snap and not a full blown picnic.
On the other hand I'm from very West Yorkshire (i.e. not central West Yorkshire - there is a difference): Calderdale - and we were so poor, we didn't have any snap/jock/shim shams/pack up/luncheon/bait or piece   ;D  Luxury !




We got a piece of stale bread, with some dripping, if we were lucky! :'(
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If I should fall to rise no more,
As many comrades did before,
Then ask the fifes and drums to play.
Over the hills and far away.

Ridge

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Re: A sandwich by any other name....
« Reply #10 on: 21:03:23, 23/01/19 »
Originally from South Yorkshire I recognise snap and pack-up but have never heard jock.
Over hill, over dale. Thorough brush, thorough brier....
I do wander every where

jimbob

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Re: A sandwich by any other name....
« Reply #11 on: 21:09:19, 23/01/19 »
Dropping!  Dripping! You from the landed classes are you. Most we got was a look at the lard and a lick of the crust.
I had forgotten about scran.

Turns out Snap is named after the tins that people (especially pitman) used to keep their food clean. They had snap on lids.
« Last Edit: 08:22:19, 24/01/19 by jimbob »
Too little, too late, too bad......

rural roamer

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Re: A sandwich by any other name....
« Reply #12 on: 08:14:49, 24/01/19 »
Must either be boring or posh in Suffolk then. We just call them sandwiches and picnic. Have heard of “pack-up” though, the others are new to me, you learn something every day.  8)

phil1960

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Re: A sandwich by any other name....
« Reply #13 on: 09:00:44, 24/01/19 »
It’s sandwiches or picnic in South Wales too, I mean we’re sat on a piece of thin foam on a mountainside rock somewhere, not flicking up the coat tails at a posh restaurant lol. I have heard the term ‘nose bag’ before now but I think that harks back to the early 19th century in Wales.
Touching from a distance, further all the time.

sussamb

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Re: A sandwich by any other name....
« Reply #14 on: 09:10:05, 24/01/19 »
Nose bag often used in the army for a bagged meal  O0
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