Author Topic: A sandwich by any other name....  (Read 2012 times)

Innominate Man

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Re: A sandwich by any other name....
« Reply #30 on: 22:52:03, 24/01/19 »
Originally from South Yorkshire I recognise snap and pack-up but have never heard jock.
This might be worth a look (or maybe not .... it's a bit long winded). The item referring to jock is just over half way down the 'page' if you scroll into the area where people respond & put their own recollections.
It was posted by .. anonymous   just after a comment by lucy morton.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/northyorkshire/voices2005/glossary/glossary.shtml
Only a hill but all of life to me, up there between the sunset and the sea. 
Geoffrey Winthrop Young

inthebagbud

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Re: A sandwich by any other name....
« Reply #31 on: 06:01:25, 26/01/19 »
Baggin is how we used to refer to our packed lunch ,

Ridge

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Re: A sandwich by any other name....
« Reply #32 on: 08:55:07, 26/01/19 »
http://www.bbc.co.uk/northyorkshire/voices2005/glossary/glossary.shtml
Interesting list IM. Some of the words I recognised and some I didn't, but then Yorkshire is a big place. What did surprise me is a number of words which I just thought were English rather than Yorkshire.
Over hill, over dale. Thorough brush, thorough brier....
I do wander every where

Islandplodder

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Re: A sandwich by any other name....
« Reply #33 on: 17:52:37, 26/01/19 »

I've found the replies really interesting.
I enjoyed that link as well.  The thing is, you don't always find out which words are local until you try them on someone else.  I remember giving someone directions to find the flat I was living in at the time and said something like 'turn left down the ginnel' and she was totally flummoxed, I had no idea it wasn't a general term.

sunnydale

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Re: A sandwich by any other name....
« Reply #34 on: 21:05:55, 26/01/19 »
I usually refer to my lunch time sandwiches as 'sarnies'.  My dad used to call his 'pack-up'.
I've heard the term 'grub' but most of the other terms here are new to me! ???


It's funny that when I'm at home, I prepare 'tea' (eaten between 5.30pm-6.00pm)...but if I fancy going out to eat, I say 'Let's go out for an evening meal', instead of 'Let's go out for tea'! :D
***Happiness is only a smile away***

Ridge

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Re: A sandwich by any other name....
« Reply #35 on: 23:52:31, 26/01/19 »
I've heard the term 'grub' but most of the other terms here are new to me! ???
Grub is one of the words which I have only just discovered isn't common across the country.
Over hill, over dale. Thorough brush, thorough brier....
I do wander every where

Innominate Man

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Re: A sandwich by any other name....
« Reply #36 on: 00:03:46, 31/01/19 »
Interesting list IM. Some of the words I recognised and some I didn't, but then Yorkshire is a big place. What did surprise me is a number of words which I just thought were English rather than Yorkshire.
My branch of the family who used jock were from a small town/village which was a satellite to Barnsley. My Grandma spoke in a similar way (but still a heavier accent) as Charlie Williams.

.....It's funny that when I'm at home, I prepare 'tea' (eaten between 5.30pm-6.00pm)...but if I fancy going out to eat, I say 'Let's go out for an evening meal', instead of 'Let's go out for tea'! :D
We've always said 'tea' and our son, who now lives below Watford Gap, will refer to going out for dinner, despite having had tea for umpteen years with us !
Dinner, to me is what you have mid-day'ish.
What a great language we've got - the central W.Yorks will say 'nooo' with a drawled out pronunciation of the vowel - which is a flat sound compared to friends in Castleford who would always say no with the 'o' as if it were 'OW' more like Nessa's (Ruth Jones) favourite word  :-\



Only a hill but all of life to me, up there between the sunset and the sea. 
Geoffrey Winthrop Young