Author Topic: Sony cybershot?  (Read 1251 times)

lostme1

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Re: Sony cybershot?
« Reply #30 on: 22:58:45, 07/03/19 »
There are white balance settings for sun, cloud, shade and others I can't remember without checking on the camera. They make a difference on my Sony HX90V.
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April

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Re: Sony cybershot?
« Reply #31 on: 08:43:25, 08/03/19 »
I have to admit I never fiddle with any of the settings on my Sony. I have it on the gold coloured auto setting and +1 on the exposure dial all the time. The pics on the camera screen are more or less the same when I upload them to my pc before any editing. Sorry I'm not an expert with cameras, I tend to lose concentration after 10 seconds if I look at the camera manual  :-[
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Bigfoot_Mike

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Re: Sony cybershot?
« Reply #32 on: 13:37:46, 08/03/19 »
The problem with auto WB is that the camera is looking for a balanced colour approximating to its internal standard for white. If the picture is dominated by a colour, the auto WB setting will interpret this as an unwanted colour cast and try to remove it. A green colour cast is quite common under fluorescent lighting. Cloudy and shade settings will tend to make the resultant photo redder than it would have otherwise been to compensate for the loss of red tones in these situations. Selecting one of these is useful for enhancing sunsets and sunrises. Our brains have built in auto WB, so we often donít notice the colour casts and paper will appear white to us under fluorescent light. This also m Ames us tend to remember sunsets as more vivid than the camera captures.


Auto settings can help at the beginning, but they often reduce the quality of the photo, as the camera just follows pre-programmed rules and doesnít know what you are trying to achieve.

pdstsp

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Re: Sony cybershot?
« Reply #33 on: 14:36:46, 08/03/19 »
I have to admit I never fiddle with any of the settings on my Sony. I have it on the gold coloured auto setting and +1 on the exposure dial all the time. The pics on the camera screen are more or less the same when I upload them to my pc before any editing. Sorry I'm not an expert with cameras, I tend to lose concentration after 10 seconds if I look at the camera manual  :-[


I was the same, April, and got some ok results. Then I started my night school photography course and now I rarely use auto - I use aperture, shutter priority and full manual options.  Of course my photos are now, virtually without exception, [email protected] >:( ;D

fernman

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Re: Sony cybershot?
« Reply #34 on: 18:13:06, 08/03/19 »
When I did evening classes in photography for beginners we were given an assignment to take shots of reflections. So I went to Wembley Park where just down the road from the station there was a big modern office block made with reflective glass.
I set my tripod up and zoomed in and out getting reflections of the trees on the glass, and the next thing I knew I was grabbed by three security guards.
Now I knew that technically there's nothing to stop you photographing anything you want, but it seemed that this building was the HQ of a company called BASF and they had some pretty high security stuff in there, so they didn't like people setting up cameras and taking pictures of their windows!

Kukkudrill

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Re: Sony cybershot?
« Reply #35 on: 21:46:11, 08/03/19 »
I used my Cybershot WX-60 again yesterday, and one thing I was reminded of that I should have mentioned in my earlier post is that most of the time, as soon as I turn the camera on to take a picture the colours look very washed out on the lcd screen, and that is how the resulting shots look too.

Does that signify anything particular to the experts out there?

An example follows, a picture "straight off the camera" and the same shot after editing:






Problem seems to me to be lack of contrast, rather than incorrect white balance. By any chance is the lens clean?
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