Author Topic: "Section Hiking" anyone?  (Read 925 times)

Litehiker

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"Section Hiking" anyone?
« on: 03:27:09, 25/02/19 »
I've walked about 1/4 of the Appalachian Trail in three different years, hiking sections. Then I realized the AT was just too populated for my taste and quit backpacking there.


This summer I'm attempting the 500 mile Colorado Trail. I say "attempting" B/C I'm 75 and those 12,000 ft. sections may be too difficult. Or I'll just rent a [email protected] llama!  ;)



Do you Brits "section hike" to finish a trail?


Eric B.

beefy

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Re: "Section Hiking" anyone?
« Reply #1 on: 08:31:52, 25/02/19 »
Hi and welcome to the forum O0
I'm a bit confused with some of the American terminology

How does a section hiker, or through hiker differ from a "normal hiker"
Thanks

DRIP COFFINS  :D

pdstsp

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Re: "Section Hiking" anyone?
« Reply #2 on: 08:36:11, 25/02/19 »
Morning Beefy - my understanding is that a through hiker does a trail from end to end in one go, while a section hiker may do it over several visits - bit like doing a week on the C2C one year and then going back the next to finish it off.  No idea what a normal hiker is, never met one. O0
Paul

beefy

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Re: "Section Hiking" anyone?
« Reply #3 on: 08:43:54, 25/02/19 »
Morning Beefy - my understanding is that a through hiker does a trail from end to end in one go, while a section hiker may do it over several visits - bit like doing a week on the C2C one year and then going back the next to finish it off.  No idea what a normal hiker is, never met one. O0
Paul
Thanks pdstsp  ;D ;D ;D
DRIP COFFINS  :D

Owen

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Re: "Section Hiking" anyone?
« Reply #4 on: 08:45:51, 25/02/19 »
I think the answer is some do some do the whole thing in one go. I guess it depends on how much time you can get off work.

gunwharfman

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Re: "Section Hiking" anyone?
« Reply #5 on: 09:30:40, 25/02/19 »
I've often seen the terms 'section hiker' and 'through hiker.' I never did know what they meant.

Islandplodder

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Re: "Section Hiking" anyone?
« Reply #6 on: 11:38:21, 25/02/19 »

I suppose trails in Britain aren't so long as American ones, so there isn't such a time commitment.  You would have to be very fortunate, or maybe retired, to take time off work, family, mortgage  etc to do a trail which took you 4 or 5 months, whereas here you are usually talking one or two weeks, so it is easier to think in terms of doing the trail in one go.
That said, some people do break them up into week long sections, especially the longer trails.
I like to do a long distance walk every year, sometimes a recognised trail, occasionally just one I made up.  But I also like to have one on the go that I do in chunks of 2 or 3 days when there is time and a window in the weather.
So I suppose the answer is both.  We just haven't developed the terminology over here.

Rather be walking

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Re: "Section Hiking" anyone?
« Reply #7 on: 11:50:07, 25/02/19 »
Welcome LiteHiker from the south coast near the City of Portsmouth.I've picked up those terms when 'through' hiking the 'South West Coastal Path' in the late 1980's. :)
Jon.
““The hardest part was coming to terms with the constant dispiriting discovery that there is always more hill.”
― Bill Bryson, A Walk in the Woods

Jac

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Re: "Section Hiking" anyone?
« Reply #8 on: 12:27:41, 25/02/19 »

Welcome from Devon.
Took me 10 yrs to section hike/backpack the southwest coast path - all 600+ miles of it plus adding a few miles
along what was the alternative inland route above Weymouth, round the isle of Portland not included in the original route and finishing by [/color][/font][/size]
walking across the heathland into Wareham.
Couldn't afford to take time off work to do it in one go.
Most walks start by finding the way out of the car park

astaman

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Re: "Section Hiking" anyone?
« Reply #9 on: 16:10:47, 25/02/19 »
I've come across the terms 'section hiker' and 'through hiker' on blogs and forums that involve American walkers. I have met people who have done the Pennine Way in two one week sections. Also, the official Cambrian Way website splits into three sections: north, mid and south. This suggests they are thinking of people doing it in sections. It's long and tough by British standards so this would make sense.

Litehiker

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Re: "Section Hiking" anyone?
« Reply #10 on: 23:02:08, 25/02/19 »
PDSTSP,
"No idea what a normal hiker is, never met one."  Hee, hee  SO right! Especially the women.


A "section hiker' hikes a long trail one section of it at a time. Doing two sections at two different times in a year, for example, is how it is done. My hiking buddy has completed about 4/5 of the AT in perhaps the last 20 years. He is arthritic and therefore it takes him longer to hike say, 10 -15 miles per day.


On the other hand I'm going to attempt the 500 mile Colorado Trail in the Rocky Mountains in "one go" as one poster has said. For me it's a "noe or never" through hike.


Eric B.

Slogger

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Re: "Section Hiking" anyone?
« Reply #11 on: 17:21:02, 02/03/19 »
I prefer to through hike the trails or LDP's as they are called here in the UK (long Distance Paths). Some of the shorter ones up to 100miles I have done in one continuous effort, non Stoppers as I call them, usually walking all day, night and the next day until I reach the end. The racing fraternity call them 'Ultra's'. Carrying 30lbs or 14 kg I usually average 30 miles a day on a route, obviously on something like the PCT and carrying a whole lot more, the mileage would decrease accordingly.

Litehiker

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Re: "Section Hiking" anyone?
« Reply #12 on: 21:40:14, 02/03/19 »
Slogger,


You should not be carrying more than 30 lbs./14 kg. on the long trails of North America if you were using UL gear. My own gear is not excessively light but it is durable and comfortable.

For a 4 day November Grand Canyon North rim-to-South Rim backpack in 2017 I carried 28 lbs. with some cold weather clothing and 5 days of food and fuel.


MY BIG  THREE:
TENT-> Tarptent Moment DW - 2.5 lbs.
PACK->  Osprey EXOS 58 - 2 lbs. 11 oz.
SLEEP SYSTEM-> Western Mountaineering Megalite down bag - 1 lb. 7 oz.  ~  REI FLASH Insulated 3 season Air mattress - 15 oz.

My stove is usually a light Trail Designs Caldera Cone stove, 3 cup aluminum pot and ESBIT fuel tablets

Eric B.


Snowman

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Re: "Section Hiking" anyone?
« Reply #13 on: 01:57:21, 05/03/19 »
Hi Litehiker,


Good to hear from you.  It's refreshing to get a more international view of things, but you've spoilt my future thoughts on doing the Appalachian Trail.   I always thought that once my sons had finished school I could take a few weeks to do something like that, especially since the USA does have so much to offer in terms of places that need to be seen - I've been there a few times.   My view is that splitting a trail into bite sized chunks is fine (whatever the terminology used) so you go ahead and keep us informed how it goes and where you've got to.   If my kids finally get independence then let me know and I'll join you.


Snowman.




Litehiker

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Re: "Section Hiking" anyone?
« Reply #14 on: 04:11:43, 05/03/19 »
Smnowman,


If you can train aerobically for higher altitudes Highly recommend the Colorado Trail. Do it all at once but with rest days in nearby towns. You can hitch rides from the highway to town and back again to the trailhead. But stay in town a few days, resupply and head out again. You can mail food ahead to yourself in care of General Delivery and pick up the box at the town Post Office.


The scenery of the CT, once you walk a few days away from Denver, is spectacular. And the CT has a thriving support system of trail maintenance crews, a great handbook and even a few rest yurts. Then at the western end you will find the very beautiful and quaint town of Durango set in the Rockies. Rest and drink some of our great local craft beers. In the US we are now enjoying a wonderful craft beer era. O0


Eric B.