Author Topic: Use a rescue beacon?  (Read 1363 times)

GinAndPlatonic

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Re: Use a rescue beacon?
« Reply #15 on: 02:46:51, 26/02/19 »
Yep, been mentioned here before but always worth repeating http://www.emergencysms.net
I hope I don`t sound pedantic but isn`t that service only for visually or hearing impaired people..

sussamb

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Re: Use a rescue beacon?
« Reply #16 on: 06:29:50, 26/02/19 »
No, although that link implies it is. Anyone can use the service.
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sussamb

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Re: Use a rescue beacon?
« Reply #17 on: 06:33:12, 26/02/19 »
Just curious as to how many times you have been in a risky situation regarding your safety.?


Does seem to be rather a habit, perhaps an indication that Deolman is taking on more than he can reasonably manage and time to re-evaluate his walking habits.
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Deolman

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Re: Use a rescue beacon?
« Reply #18 on: 06:46:38, 26/02/19 »
There is always an element of risk when walking even if you are only going to the shops. I go out most weekends but my walks do not tend to be high risk and I do not have constant health problems but just now and again something happens which means I have to curtail the walk. In wales it was a reasonable flat walk of about 10 miles and just near the end walking across a flat field I got severe chest pain which was not settling after using GTN spray. Initially it was suspected I may be having another MI but that was later ruled out and the reason for the problem could not be explained. In Ennerdale I doubt anyone could have predicted the heatwave that started just as I began walking the C2C and had I had a crystal ball I would have cancelled the walk. As said previously when I got to Richmond I reassessed the risk and in view of the North Yorkshire Moors I decided the risk was too high and curtailed the rest of the walk. Even quite recently I had a situation returning home from the gym when my heart rate shot up to 179bpm and while the paramedics were treating me it just dropped like a stone back to normal. I am still under investigation for that one but again the consultants at moment do not know what caused the problem. I have had many conversations about whether I should continue walking especially with my daughter but the consultants reckon my heart is strong and there is no reason to give up just yet. Twelve months after my last MI I completed the C2C with no problem.

Deolman

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Re: Use a rescue beacon?
« Reply #19 on: 06:58:01, 26/02/19 »

Does seem to be rather a habit, perhaps an indication that Deolman is taking on more than he can reasonably manage and time to re-evaluate his walking habits.


I do go out most weekends and whilst I have had a few incidents whilst walking, in comparison to the number of walks I have done they are a very low percentage. When planning a walk I always look for relatively flat walks with low ascents and when walking LDW’s I always keep the sections to around ten miles or so per day, and I would never walk if I was advised not to by a doctor or consultant. Maybe you could start another topic “At what point should one retire from walking”


sussamb

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Re: Use a rescue beacon?
« Reply #20 on: 07:08:05, 26/02/19 »
I'm not suggesting you retire, just re-evaluate.  I suspect not many on here have had to call out a MRT once, let alone twice as it seems you have?  You say you limit your LDW walk sectors to around 10 but the example you gave was a 15 mile leg in the heat, across quite tough terrain and you have a heart condition.  You got around 10 miles into that walk then made a rather dubious call to press on when you weren't feeling too good, resulting in a MRT call out. 


Can you not see that suggests you're taking on more than you should?  I wouldn't want to see anyone stop walking, but it should be in line with their capability.
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Deolman

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Re: Use a rescue beacon?
« Reply #21 on: 07:32:32, 26/02/19 »
I'm not suggesting you retire, just re-evaluate.  I suspect not many on here have had to call out a MRT once, let alone twice as it seems you have?  You say you limit your LDW walk sectors to around 10 but the example you gave was a 15 mile leg in the heat, across quite tough terrain and you have a heart condition.  You got around 10 miles into that walk then made a rather dubious call to press on when you weren't feeling too good, resulting in a MRT call out. 


Can you not see that suggests you're taking on more than you should?  I wouldn't want to see anyone stop walking, but it should be in line with their capability.


I evaluate all my walks and with respect to the C2C I walked it with no problems two years ago twelve months after my second MI when the weather was more typical of a British summer. As said I doubt anyone in evaluating and planning a walk, particularly months before the walk takes place, could have predicted the heatwave that started at the beginning of July. With respect to the LDW’s I always use B&B’s for accommodation and use the services of a baggage handler. With respect to the C2C, having walked the first leg from St Bees to Ennerdale I knew the heat could be a problem and had already made plans to skip the section from Rosthwaite to Patterdale and, as with my first C2C walk, avoided Kirsty Pike by walking around the Ullswater route and staying at Bampton Grange. Had the forecast for the temp during the day been more accurate I was also prepared to abandon the second leg but the forecasted temp was for 27degrees not the 35 plus that it happened to reach and was still that high even at 6pm. No matter how thorough you try to evaluate the risk of a particular walk even the most experienced walker can get caught out.

sussamb

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Re: Use a rescue beacon?
« Reply #22 on: 07:42:31, 26/02/19 »
No matter how thorough you try to evaluate the risk of a particular walk even the most experienced walker can get caught out.


I agree, but it's a question of taking acceptable risks and making sensible decisions when things go wrong.  I hope you enjoy walking for many years to come, but there are warning signs in your posts that suggests you may need to back off a bit  :)
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Deolman

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Re: Use a rescue beacon?
« Reply #23 on: 07:52:45, 26/02/19 »

I agree, but it's a question of taking acceptable risks and making sensible decisions when things go wrong.  I hope you enjoy walking for many years to come, but there are warning signs in your posts that suggests you may need to back off a bit  :)


I have only used the MRT once and regarding the first incident I felt I could have walked out once things settled but was advised not to because it was suspected I might be having an MI.

GinAndPlatonic

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Re: Use a rescue beacon?
« Reply #24 on: 09:04:34, 26/02/19 »
No, although that link implies it is. Anyone can use the service.
O0

BuzyG

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Re: Use a rescue beacon?
« Reply #25 on: 18:39:24, 26/02/19 »
Just curious as to how many times you have been in a risky situation regarding your safety.?


I was thinking the same thing.

GinAndPlatonic

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Re: Use a rescue beacon?
« Reply #26 on: 18:55:26, 26/02/19 »
Even quite recently I had a situation returning home from the gym when my heart rate shot up to 179bpm and while the paramedics were treating me it just dropped like a stone back to normal. I am still under investigation for that one but again the consultants at moment do not know what caused the problem.
Was it the paramedics that measured your heart rate at 179 bpm.?

Deolman

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Re: Use a rescue beacon?
« Reply #27 on: 20:29:16, 26/02/19 »
Was it the paramedics that measured your heart rate at 179 bpm.?


I had checked it myself as I still had my heart monitor on from the gym. When it didn’t respond with the GTN spray I called Emegency Services. They hooked me up to the ECG machine and that confirmed the heart rate as 179bpm. Just after putting me on the ECG the Paramedic sat back in surprise as my heart rate just dropped from 179 to 45bpm. Fortunately the ECG had captured the high rate and it is now being investigated by the Cardiac Consultant as to what may have caused the problem. The Consultant was somewhat surprised at the ECG trace as it showd no abnormalities and the heart beat was regular even though it was so fast. But then most of the incidents I have had have all been one offs. All previous tests and scans show the heart is healthy and strong and the Consultants reckon this is due to my high fitness level due in no small part to the walking I do.

sussamb

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Re: Use a rescue beacon?
« Reply #28 on: 20:43:13, 26/02/19 »
Sorry but I struggle with that, as an ex paramedic.  If you carry a GTN spray you have a heart condition so it's not strong and healthy, and I can't see a consultant saying it is.  You also mentioned heart conditions earlier and talked about possibly having another MI (for those not familiar with the term MI is a type of heart attack).
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Deolman

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Re: Use a rescue beacon?
« Reply #29 on: 20:50:36, 26/02/19 »
I had two blocked arteries which were stented in 2015. The GTN spray is carried as a precaution in case I have another angina attack. Over twenty years I have only ever had to use it three times.  I only live 10 mins from the Liverpool Heart and Chest Hospital which is one of the top Cardiac centres in the country. I presume they know what they are talking about.