Author Topic: Offa's Dyke Path - Trip report  (Read 535 times)

FTSTTLB

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Offa's Dyke Path - Trip report
« on: 07:20:01, 26/02/19 »
As is the case with Hadrian's Wall Path (see Rest of England for that) I'm starting to translate my blog about Offa's Dyke Path (well, the part between Prestatyn and Knighton).
For those who don't know what it is, it's a national trail following the old (and sometimes current) border between Wales and England.

Here's a summary https://wp.me/p93xVa-2r

I've also done the first part, starting in Prestatyn, a coastal town in the north of Wales (Irish Sea) to Bodfari, at the start of the Clwydian Range, an area of outstanding natural beauty https://wp.me/p93xVa-2D

Hope you enjoy or share stories yourself!


sussamb

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Re: Offa's Dyke Path - Trip report
« Reply #1 on: 08:03:20, 26/02/19 »
Thanks for posting, reminds me of my OD walk a few years ago now.  Didn't know about the shell thing though so may have to do it again  ;D
Where there's a will ...

barewirewalker

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Re: Offa's Dyke Path - Trip report
« Reply #2 on: 19:35:55, 26/02/19 »
Interesting to read your blog and it may interest you to know that a point shortly after leaving Knighton you will leave the true line of Offa's Dyke, as a archaeological entity and follow a route of convenience that suits those who prefer it to be something else. There are sections of the Dyke marked on the OS map that show it to veer east into Herefordshire and then the old boundary of Mercia becomes the River Wye until the Offa's Dyke Trail re-crosses the river at Hay on Wye. Not having walked it this far south I do not know if the information supplied recognise this.

I discovered this anomaly around 2012, when the CLA published their national policy document on access and our rights of way network. I had been following the rather puerile writings of one Harry Cotterell, who had become the president of this landowner's lobby group, I say puerile because he seems to have concocted a policy on zero input about the history of access and only used biased anecdotes, collected from CLA membership as the basis for publishing a policy centered around trimming the access network under a heading of 'Common Sense'.

The very fact that his family owns an estate of some 2000 acres in Herefordshire, which he claimed to manage the agricultural business, has Offa's Dyke within it and probably that part, where the north section terminates at the River Wye, escapes his notice. Surely landowners should be aware of how their ownership of land that includes parts of our national heritage impacts on the rest of the community.

I hope you enjoy the rest of the trail, this little anomaly may interest you and if you do find any other comments on this, I would be very interested to hear them.  Maybe I have the wrong end of a stick, but an explanation why the national trail deviates from the true historic line, without pointing a finger at landowners, who are in denial of the Corruption of the Definitive Map, claim that we have the best access to countryside in the world and advocate trimming out those underused ways, rather than adding in lostways to make them effective, seems relevant.

BWW
Their Land is in Our Country.

FTSTTLB

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Re: Offa's Dyke Path - Trip report
« Reply #3 on: 10:24:48, 27/02/19 »
Hello. Thank you for the reply. We didn't walk that stretch I think. We did half of it, from Prestatyn to Knighton, so I assume it's between Knighton to Kington. There are some parts of the Dyke on private terrain, near Chirk if I recall correctly, but there the path doesn't deviate that much, it's just that the remains of the Dyke are behind a fence or wall.
I'll look it up in my guides (Trailblazer/Cicerone). Perhaps it is mentioned there.

FTSTTLB

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Re: Offa's Dyke Path - Trip report
« Reply #4 on: 16:15:30, 01/03/19 »
Day 2: Bodfari to Clwyd Gate (****) On day 2 you walk in the Clwydian range, an area of outstanding natural beauty, and rightly so. It is a succession of hill tops and shoulders, going up and down, between 450 and 555 metres. It is quite a challenging part, but the view is more than worth it. It is truly an amazing walking experience.

Link: https://seatothelandbeyond.wordpress.com/2019/03/01/2-bodfari-clwyd-gate-18-km-112-m/

joncombe

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Re: Offa's Dyke Path - Trip report
« Reply #5 on: 19:52:47, 01/03/19 »
I started Offa's Dyke Path earlier this year but going south to north, from the start at Sebury Cliffs. I've so far got as far as Hay-on-Wye. Got to say it's been a teriffic walk so far. Extremely varied but stunning scenery throughout. Even if I did do much of the ridge between Pandy and Hay-on-Wye in mist when the cloud descended! Very glad I decided to do it.


FTSTTLB

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Re: Offa's Dyke Path - Trip report
« Reply #6 on: 06:46:51, 02/03/19 »
Second part looks lovely to. We're thinking about doing it this summer and combining it with some parts of the Wales coast path

FTSTTLB

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Re: Offa's Dyke Path - Trip report
« Reply #7 on: 18:12:10, 06/03/19 »
Day 3: Clwyd Gate - Llangollen (*****) https://wp.me/p93xVa-2Y

The day begins with the last hills of the Clwydian Range. After that the path descends into the small village of Llandegla, where you walk through its epynomous forest. Once out of the woods, you walk amidst the colourful heather. A small passage of roadwalking leads you to World's end and the Eglwyseg crags, with its screes and a view over the Dee valley. After an hour you reach the town of Llangollen, also being able to admire the splendid ruin of Dinas Brân.

Possibly (well, undoubtedly) my favourite part of at least the Prestatyn-Knighton stretch. Stunning scenery.

FTSTTLB

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Re: Offa's Dyke Path - Trip report
« Reply #8 on: 16:30:05, 13/03/19 »
Day 4: Llangollen - Chirk (***) https://wp.me/p93xVa-38
Relatively short stage. The first two kilometres the path follows the Panorama Walk, looking over the Dee Valley . After that you pass through Trevor Hall Wood and over the famous Pontcysyllte aqueduct, that is part of the Llangollen canal. The path follows the canal until it meanders back to green fields and meadows. There you can actually see Offa's Dyke, along with Chirk Castle in the distance.

sussamb

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Re: Offa's Dyke Path - Trip report
« Reply #9 on: 21:02:14, 13/03/19 »
Loved the walk along the viaduct  ... And a good pub before you cross  O0
Where there's a will ...

FTSTTLB

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Re: Offa's Dyke Path - Trip report
« Reply #10 on: 14:47:28, 18/03/19 »
Day 5: Chirk - Llanymynech (***) https://wp.me/p93xVa-3c
A shortend stage due to weather predictions. Because of that we skipped a couple of hills and started at the remains of an 18th century racecourse. From there on you go through a forest, with quite a bit of Offa's Dyke visible, and two small and easy climbs, the last one leading you to an old limestone quarry, now a nature reserve and unto Llanymynech, a village on the border between England and Wales.

FTSTTLB

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Re: Offa's Dyke Path - Trip report
« Reply #11 on: Today at 18:25:51 »
Day 6: Llanymynech – Welshpool(*) https://wp.me/p6mTIY-4w
An easy stage, made slightly more difficult due to some rain. The path follows Montgomery Canal for a while, until it heads in fields and meadows for quite a bit. You can admire Offa’s Dyke for quite a bit. After a dangerous encounter with some cows, you rejoin the Canal past Pool Quay. The stage officialy ends in Buttington, but you can visit or stay in Welshpool and see the beautiful Powis Castle.