Author Topic: Approach shoes for long distance walks?  (Read 781 times)

Jac

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Re: Approach shoes for long distance walks?
« Reply #15 on: 18:25:59, 10/03/19 »
  Try walking on the Dartmoor ranges in walking shoes, definitely not recommended.   Firstly there's what I call 'tufty grass', where it's very easy to turn an ankle so boots with decent ankle support are essential. 



I guess that's a (very) polite name for [censored] tussock grass.


I happily wear my Roclites on Dartmoor
Most walks start by finding the way out of the car park

Snowman

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Re: Approach shoes for long distance walks?
« Reply #16 on: 20:57:10, 10/03/19 »


I happily wear my Roclites on Dartmoor


Isn't that a little like saying 'I wear a pair of trousers'?   Roclites come in a variety of styles some of which, such as the 345 have ankle support.
I know that there's a lot of Dartmoor that isn't especially rugged which is why I specified the ranges (to the west).   If you are happy that your ankles can stand the bashing that they can get from your 'tussocks' on the ranges, and are happy getting your feet ankle deep in stagnant water, then lucky old you.   I'm a mere mortal who, like the British Army who often use the western Dartmoor ranges, like to have the decent ankle support you get from a pair of boots.   In addition I often walk on my own so I feel it's safer to err on the side of caution.

archaeoroutes

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Re: Approach shoes for long distance walks?
« Reply #17 on: 18:59:32, 11/03/19 »
There is a trade-off between risk and speed, sometimes. Over my years training on the Dartmoor ranges, my boots have progressively got lighter and less sturdy. From the good old Pro boot developed after the lessons from Falklands, to current ones designed for Afghanistan. When up there in civvies, I now tend to use Roclite 325s for a great compromise on support and speed. I can run in them for hours almost as easily as my fell running shoes and yet they are above the ankle boots.

Same in Snowdonia or anywhere. If I'm just walking or scrambling I'll probably use my La Sportiva Guide mountain boots. If I'm running the same route I'd go for my Roclite 325s or even my Asics FujiTrabuco fell running shoes. Similarly, my waterproofs would shift from Paramo smock to a 2.5 layer ultralight pull-on, etc. Yes, there is a greater risk, but it is a conscious trade-off for a given purpose.
And if I'm walking in then guiding a client up an easy climb I might well wear my Scarpa Gecko approach shoes.
Or perhaps I'm just sticking to the main paths up Snowdon in decent weather and I might not bother to change out of my North Face Hedgehog walking shoes.

One thing I've found in years of leading and instructing is that the biggest injury factors in shoes/boots are a really soft sole, insufficient tread, and slippery rubber. The first two are typically due to people wearing trainers and the latter is usually brand new boots. Soft sole can lead directly to toe injuries in rough ground/pebbles, and all can lead to potentially dangerous slips. I now worry more about soles than I do ankle support in normal hillwalking.
Walking routes visiting ancient sites in Britain's uplands: http://www.archaeoroutes.co.uk

Jac

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Re: Approach shoes for long distance walks?
« Reply #18 on: 10:18:14, 14/03/19 »

Isn't that a little like saying 'I wear a pair of trousers'?   Roclites come in a variety of styles some of which, such as the 345 have ankle support.
I know that there's a lot of Dartmoor that isn't especially rugged which is why I specified the ranges (to the west).   If you are happy that your ankles can stand the bashing that they can get from your 'tussocks' on the ranges, and are happy getting your feet ankle deep in stagnant water, then lucky old you.   I'm a mere mortal who, like the British Army who often use the western Dartmoor ranges, like to have the decent ankle support you get from a pair of boots.   In addition I often walk on my own so I feel it's safer to err on the side of caution.


Not wanting to get into a pedantic argument but yesterday enjoyed 10 miles up the Erme valley and across the open moor wearing Inov8 Roclite 320 GTXs . In fact the moor was not too wet just rather squidgy (very cold and windy) but the path alongside the river Erme was deeply muddy, rough and waterlogged. Feet stayed dry and I stayed happy ;) 


PS I also wore trousers
« Last Edit: 10:26:41, 14/03/19 by Jac »
Most walks start by finding the way out of the car park

BuzyG

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Re: Approach shoes for long distance walks?
« Reply #19 on: 20:57:46, 14/03/19 »
I  wear karrimore training shoes, when it"s dry on the Moors in the summer, pretty tough.  I have also worn them a few times in the snow, with blind stiched surfing socks.  Though boots are far better for me.

Jim Parkin

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Re: Approach shoes for long distance walks?
« Reply #20 on: 22:02:57, 17/03/19 »
<snip>

One thing I've found in years of leading and instructing is that the biggest injury factors in shoes/boots are a really soft sole, insufficient tread, and slippery rubber. The first two are typically due to people wearing trainers and the latter is usually brand new boots. Soft sole can lead directly to toe injuries in rough ground/pebbles, and all can lead to potentially dangerous slips. I now worry more about soles than I do ankle support in normal hillwalking.
The really soft sole can definitely be a problem.  I found Innov8 Talon212's to be very uncomfortable on the gravel parts of the track between Hayfield and Edale Cross, for example - I really didn't enjoy feeling every stone underfoot in a way that I wouldn't have even in Tevas, for example.