Author Topic: Boots  (Read 656 times)

martin71

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Boots
« on: 08:30:30, 10/03/19 »
Out yesterday for 11 miles, mostly on country roads, & forest tracks and a little muddy/rocky trail. Since I took up walking at start of year, yesterday was first time out in rain and in soft muddy ground, I learnt a valuable & slightly annoying lesson. My expensive ( to me) North Face boots are not waterproof. So on the look out now for something decent. Like all gear, there’s so much to choose from, but has anyone any good recommendations? 

Slowcoach

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Re: Boots
« Reply #1 on: 08:47:14, 10/03/19 »
A lot will depend on the fit of the boot suiting you. I have for many years worn Berghaus Trek Gtx boots which are inexpensive and have proved to be comfortable and waterproof under most conditions but walking a month ago in the Lakes in lashing rain, slushy snow and on paths that became streams they did let in a little dampness. I am now wearing Oboz Sawtooth Bdry boots and have worn them in deep mud, paths running with water and long wet grass and my feet have stayed perfectly dry.
I never pay more than £100 for a pair of boots.
It's all uphill from here.

kinkyboots

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Re: Boots
« Reply #2 on: 10:36:50, 10/03/19 »
My expensive ( to me) North Face boots are not waterproof. So on the look out now for something decent. Like all gear, there’s so much to choose from, but has anyone any good recommendations?

At the risk of upsetting a few people unfortunately North Face seem to be becoming more of a "fashion" brand these days than a serious outdoor brand.

It's impossible to make recommendations until we know what your budget limit is and whether you would prefer a full leather or a fabric/leathercombination style of boot.

I would suggest that with proper care and maintenance a full leather boot will give you better waterproofing and will almost certainly last longer than any fabric/leathercombination style of boot. The downside to that is that they will probably weigh a bit more and cost more due to the better quality materials which they're built from.

In today's market £100 buys you very little in way of a quality full leather boot and in my opinion a more realistic budget would be more in the £150 - £180 range.

In the end your choice of boot should be based on one which is primarily designed for the type of walking you do most of and on how well it fits you and how comfortable it is.

If you want  a full leather boot and really want to keep the budget down and most of your walking is fairly low level on paths and tracks as you describe you could do a lot worse than to look at the Altberg Defender military boot as issued to the British Army. They're not available in the shops but there's always plenty of both new and secondhand examples available on eBay from around £30 - £75 and that's cheap enough to be able to easily replace them when to soles eventually wear out.

https://www.altberg.co.uk/product/mens-defender-combat-boot-mod-brown-uk-military-issue-boot/

Yorkshiremarv

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Re: Boots
« Reply #3 on: 10:49:47, 10/03/19 »
I bought a pair of salomon boots a few years ago to do the Pw in, they were just over a hundred quid and looked the bizz but when actually out in the wet crappy conditions on the trail they were hopeless, i had wet feet for the 1st 5 days and at that time i vowed never to buy a rubbish pair of boots again. i now have some mammut trovat guide high gtx boots, cost me closer to 200quid so they are more of an investment but you cant put a price on comfy dry feet in horrendous conditions. Ive been stood in a bog pushing out a rally car with the water up around the knees and my feet were perfectly dry and warm. Ok these boots are heavier than anything ive owned before and do make my legs start to ache after 10+ miles but id much rather have that than wet feet. when out walking the trails and paths in wet conditions i like to walk where the water runs instead of the mud at the side, these boots are ideal for this!
"if in doubt, flat out"

alan de enfield

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Re: Boots
« Reply #4 on: 10:53:32, 10/03/19 »
you could do a lot worse than to look at the Altberg Defender military boot as issued to the British Army.



The problem I find with boots is that no 2 manufacturers seem to use the same 'sizing' methods and an '11' with one manufacturer may be a 10Wide with another or a 12Normal with yet another.


After purchasing online and the boots not fitting and not accepting returns my money was wasted - I'd have been better putting that money (and increasing my budget)  towards a more expensive boot that I could try in a 'real shop'.


If you can buy on line and have a guarantee of return than its not a problem.


Having gone thru the £20 Aldi boots (very comfortable but short lived) and the £75 'Army Boots' (didn't fit), having fairly wide feet I ended up with Meindl Meran boots.
SOOOOoooooooo comfortable straight out of the box and I've now done over 450 miles in them.


Really - TRY BEFORE YOU BUY

happyhiker

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Re: Boots
« Reply #5 on: 10:53:49, 10/03/19 »
I have Scarpa leather boots for winter and Scarpa fabric boots for summer and have never had wet feet.

Islandplodder

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Re: Boots
« Reply #6 on: 11:30:31, 10/03/19 »

I have actually found that the same make and style of boots can vary a bit between two pairs.
The last pair of boots I bought were actually more comfortable in one shop than another.  So my advice is always not just try before you buy, but buy the ones you tried on, not another apparently identical pair.
And keep the receipt, and if they are supposed to be waterproof and aren't, take them back!

Ralph

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Re: Boots
« Reply #7 on: 11:42:10, 10/03/19 »
A lot will depend on the fit of the boot suiting you. I have for many years worn Berghaus Trek Gtx boots which are inexpensive and have proved to be comfortable and waterproof under most conditions but walking a month ago in the Lakes in lashing rain, slushy snow and on paths that became streams they did let in a little dampness. I am now wearing Oboz Sawtooth Bdry boots and have worn them in deep mud, paths running with water and long wet grass and my feet have stayed perfectly dry.
I never pay more than £100 for a pair of boots.
+1 for the Oboz Sawtooth boots, great quality.

zuludog

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Re: Boots
« Reply #8 on: 11:48:55, 10/03/19 »
For wintry and/or higher, rocky conditions I wear Altberg Malham boots

For most lower level trails & long distance paths I wear Merrell MOAB shoes

However, these might not suit you; most important thing is to try boots & shoes on in the shop, and get a good fit

forgotmyoldpassword

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Re: Boots
« Reply #9 on: 12:24:37, 10/03/19 »
At the risk of upsetting a few people unfortunately North Face seem to be becoming more of a "fashion" brand these days than a serious outdoor brand.

It's impossible to make recommendations until we know what your budget limit is and whether you would prefer a full leather or a fabric/leathercombination style of boot.

I would suggest that with proper care and maintenance a full leather boot will give you better waterproofing and will almost certainly last longer than any fabric/leathercombination style of boot. The downside to that is that they will probably weigh a bit more and cost more due to the better quality materials which they're built from.

In today's market £100 buys you very little in way of a quality full leather boot and in my opinion a more realistic budget would be more in the £150 - £180 range.

In the end your choice of boot should be based on one which is primarily designed for the type of walking you do most of and on how well it fits you and how comfortable it is.

If you want  a full leather boot and really want to keep the budget down and most of your walking is fairly low level on paths and tracks as you describe you could do a lot worse than to look at the Altberg Defender military boot as issued to the British Army. They're not available in the shops but there's always plenty of both new and secondhand examples available on eBay from around £30 - £75 and that's cheap enough to be able to easily replace them when to soles eventually wear out.

https://www.altberg.co.uk/product/mens-defender-combat-boot-mod-brown-uk-military-issue-boot/


Their 'Summit' series still do technical pieces of gear which perform well, and their TKA100 fleece is a legendary mid-layer which is one of the best on the market - but you're right about most of their kit.

GinAndPlatonic

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Re: Boots
« Reply #10 on: 13:58:18, 10/03/19 »
I have gone through all sorts of boots. Leather then fabric then back to leather. My personal opinion now is a good pair of leather boots that are cleaned and waterproofed regularly is the best option. Plus I believe leather will "give" more than fabric, contrary to what may be thought.I wear Anatom Q2`s. They are superbly comfortable and I have bought a 2nd pair for when/if these wear out. It is a bit of an unsettling thought to think these may actually outlast me  ??? .

I waterproof them with Neatsfoot oil. Its been said that this oil softens leather too much. I agree it does soften leather but it does make it totally waterproof.One of the great attractions for me with these boots is that when you undo the top two lace holes/clips, then the tongue can be pushed forward and your feet just pop out..lovely at the end of a long day hiking.
« Last Edit: 16:02:13, 10/03/19 by GinAndPlatonic »

Pitboot

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Re: Boots
« Reply #11 on: 14:15:04, 10/03/19 »
This is one of those "Best jacket?" questions.
Water can appear in any boot through a hole in the leather/fabric/sole, or through sweaty feet, or simply through the open top of the boot if the water is deep enough or the grass is long and wet enough.


We are all different, so my choice of boot would not suit you in all probability.


However, my choice is to wear only what I consider to be a quality make, and that is Scarpa. I look after them properly as they are expensive and I can't afford to replace on a regular basis.
Check that any expensive boots you may buy will be resoleable, and have that done at a place like LSR, they do quality work and have never let me down.


If I know it's going to be wet I still take extra precautions such as wearing waterproof gaiters. I also would never tuck my trousers into my socks.
I have to say that during the last years of my military service I wore Altberg boots, and they were superb in every way, they can be picked up quite cheaply as mentioned above.

Jim Parkin

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Re: Boots
« Reply #12 on: 21:12:46, 10/03/19 »
I have gone through all sorts of boots. Leather then fabric then back to leather. My personal opinion now is a good pair of leather boots that are cleaned and waterproofed regularly is the best option. Plus I believe leather will "give" more than fabric, contrary to what may be thought.I wear Anatom Q2`s. They are superbly comfortable and I have bought a 2nd pair for
 <snip>
I think it depends what you want.  I often like the freedom of non-waterproof fell shoes - especially in summer.  If I'll be walking in damp conditions all day, then leather is good, and if it's actually soaking/snow, I have recently found cheapo snow boots, that are a bit like ankle wellies, but with a fabric high leg are pretty good.  I bought them as they were in a sale at £20 so thought I couldn't go wrong.  I've not done more than about 12-miles in them on any one occasion though. 

GinAndPlatonic

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Re: Boots
« Reply #13 on: 21:29:08, 10/03/19 »
I think it depends what you want.  I often like the freedom of non-waterproof fell shoes - especially in summer.  If I'll be walking in damp conditions all day, then leather is good, and if it's actually soaking/snow, I have recently found cheapo snow boots, that are a bit like ankle wellies, but with a fabric high leg are pretty good.  I bought them as they were in a sale at £20 so thought I couldn't go wrong.  I've not done more than about 12-miles in them on any one occasion though.
I have thought about something along the lines of what you describe. Even short wellingtons, as I hear some people walk in them and there`s no worries about flooded fields or crossing streams etc...If your lucky enough to get good fitting ones with nice thick socks, i can imagine they would work ok..

gunwharfman

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Re: Boots
« Reply #14 on: 21:44:19, 10/03/19 »
Leaking boots, my favourite subject!

Since I took up hiking seriously I had three pairs of leather boots, (all Brasher/Berghaus Superlites) two of them wore out before they had a chance to leak. The last pair leaked after two years use. They leaked on 11th November last year whilst climbing Great Gable. I keep wondering if it was anything to do with the hot summer we had last year?

I also over this time period have also purchased three pairs of 'fabric' boots. All supremely comfortable but all three leaked. The Salomon 4D GTX boots leaked after about 10 months, the Keen Targi boots leaked on the first day they experienced rain and my cheepo's from Decathlon leaked anyway. However the Decathlons dried quickly! If I was just concentrating on comfort I would buy the Salomon and the Keen's in an instant.

I 'studied' boot reviews a lot before Christmas and left a list in front of my PC of the ones that I thought had the qualities of comfort vs. waterproofness but I had not made a decision. My son and his wife found it and went out a bought me new boots - Salomon X Ulta GTX boots, they liked the LOOK of them! I couldn't say I didn't want them so I now wear them. They are wonderfully comfortable, I wore them across Gran Canaria recently) but as yet they haven't really seen rain, well not the sort that we get here anyway. They soon will I'm sure, especially when I go to Borrowdale soon and then walk to Edinburgh afterwards.