Author Topic: SOME OUTDATED BASIC TENT DESIGNS  (Read 669 times)

tonyk

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Re: SOME OUTDATED BASIC TENT DESIGNS
« Reply #15 on: 14:48:26, 11/03/19 »
 Never really worried about the inner tent getting a bit damp as once the stove is going it soon dries out.

fernman

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Re: SOME OUTDATED BASIC TENT DESIGNS
« Reply #16 on: 17:41:34, 11/03/19 »
Never really worried about the inner tent getting a bit damp as once the stove is going it soon dries out.


alan de enfield

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Re: SOME OUTDATED BASIC TENT DESIGNS
« Reply #17 on: 18:06:35, 11/03/19 »




Yup - that'll dry it off - an with all the additional ventilation, no need to worry about Carbon Monoxide either.

Litehiker

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Re: SOME OUTDATED BASIC TENT DESIGNS
« Reply #18 on: 19:10:50, 11/03/19 »
ferryman, Excellent "illustration" of how to dry a tent with a stove.  O0


Regarding wedge tents - These are tents that have only one pole configuration, namely a big X. Open the fly door and in comes the rain. It could be blowing from the tent's rear and the floor would still get instantly wet. I know, I owned likely the first wedge tent in the late '70s, a Jansport 2 person wedge. In my tenting ignorance I never considered this problem until it happened. Without a proper fly for protection in the form of strut supported fly you have a failed design.
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Owen has it right. The best tents for rainy conditions can be set up with the inner tent already attached

















tonyk

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Re: SOME OUTDATED BASIC TENT DESIGNS
« Reply #19 on: 19:33:26, 11/03/19 »

I have actually seen that happen on a camp site at Reeth.The owner of the tent was using an old paraffin stove that tended to have unpredictable flare ups with disasterous consequences.

Owen

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Re: SOME OUTDATED BASIC TENT DESIGNS
« Reply #20 on: 20:09:08, 11/03/19 »


Regarding wedge tents - These are tents that have only one pole configuration, namely a big X.



I think what your talking about is what is known as a "Mid" over here, short for pyramid tent.





Litehiker

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Re: SOME OUTDATED BASIC TENT DESIGNS
« Reply #21 on: 20:43:28, 11/03/19 »
owen,


No, I'm referring to a tent that is truly wedge shaped and the X'd poles form a "dome" shape when viewed from the side and a wedge shape viewed from the front.


The only 'mids I'd consider would use two poles, one on each side. A center pole drives me nuts. Been there, done that and absolutely don't like it. But I saw a really nice nylon single wall 'mid for 4 people with two support poles and even a wood stove inside with a long chimney pipe and good spark arrester. They guys were hunting elk and had it set up at the trailhead parking area. They used horses to get back into the good elk areas.


Eric B.
BTW, what the he!! time is it in Old Blighty now? 4: 44 AM?

Owen

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Re: SOME OUTDATED BASIC TENT DESIGNS
« Reply #22 on: 21:08:53, 11/03/19 »
20.45




jimbob

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Re: SOME OUTDATED BASIC TENT DESIGNS
« Reply #23 on: 21:30:50, 11/03/19 »
But I saw a really nice nylon single wall 'mid for 4 people with two support poles and even a wood stove inside with a long chimney pipe and good spark arrester. They guys were hunting elk and had it set up at the trailhead parking area. They used horses to get back into the good elk areas.
We limeys know this type of tent well enough, just the sort of thing we walkers would carry on one hip to balance a decent hip flask on the other whilst heading up Pen-y-Ghent. 

Too little, too late, too bad......

Owen

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Re: SOME OUTDATED BASIC TENT DESIGNS
« Reply #24 on: 21:37:25, 11/03/19 »
owen,


No, I'm referring to a tent that is truly wedge shaped and the X'd poles form a "dome" shape when viewed from the side and a wedge shape viewed from the front.




Something like this?





gunwharfman

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Re: SOME OUTDATED BASIC TENT DESIGNS
« Reply #25 on: 13:36:35, 12/03/19 »
If we assume for the moment that tent designs are 'outdated' what then are the tent designs that not outdated? Does such a tent exist?

Litehiker

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Re: SOME OUTDATED BASIC TENT DESIGNS
« Reply #26 on: 19:58:37, 12/03/19 »
Owen,

That is exactly what I call a "wedge" tent. Howsomever this tent has a fly that actually covers the entrance. And as I mentioned, it uses struts to hold the "awning" out. Thus I feel this design has brought the tent "up to date". BTW, Tent Police are watching...


gunny,

It depends upon the intended use of the tent.
A beach cabana shade structure of canvas is fine. Or a northwoods canvas "hot tent" for use with a tent stove is fine, so long as you have a pulk or snowmobile to haul its weight and bulk. Otherwise a canvas tent for backpacking ("wild camping") is outdated.

Any tent whose design has been greatly improved upon by other similar designs is outdated to one extent or another. (IMHO, of course.)


God forbid we should be caught carrying an outdated tent!   ::)


Eric B.
« Last Edit: 20:05:31, 12/03/19 by Litehiker »

Owen

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Re: SOME OUTDATED BASIC TENT DESIGNS
« Reply #27 on: 21:13:59, 12/03/19 »
Owen,

That is exactly what I call a "wedge" tent. Howsomever this tent has a fly that actually covers the entrance. And as I mentioned, it uses struts to hold the "awning" out. Thus I feel this design has brought the tent "up to date". BTW, Tent Police are watching...


Eric B.


That's actually a single skin gore-tex tent, worked really well in the cold dry air of the high Andes unless in Britain.   

dave_p

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Re: SOME OUTDATED BASIC TENT DESIGNS
« Reply #28 on: 11:45:40, 13/03/19 »
All tents are something of a compromise aren't they.  Different people want different things - lightness, space, big door, high walls, wind resistance, rain resistance, small pack size, single wall, twin wall, freestanding etc etc.


I have an older all in one pitch which is fine.  It's a little heavy though and not freestanding.


I also wanted a freestanding tent with a big weight reduction and good liveable space.  The tent I recently bought is officially inner pitch first, although it is possible to pitch with the fly first if you have a separate footprint and use the fast-fly configuration.  It's awkward put doable if the weather is really bad.  My tent goes up really quick so there's not much time for the inside to get wet, but if it does, I always carry a microfibre cloth for drying it anyway - it's useful when condensation builds up on still dewy nights.


I understood all this when I bought the tent and am happy with the arrangement.  I couldn't find an outer pitch tent which provided all the other features I wanted.