Author Topic: Do you have to sometimes motivate yourself to get out and about?  (Read 603 times)

gunwharfman

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As I get older I notice that I have to find ways to keep me motivated to go out on some days, or even to go on a hike. The thought and pleasure of a hike is in my head, I even do the planning, but sometimes I wobble and start to look for excuses as to why I should cancel. My excuse usually is my view about the travelling time involved, the thought of driving on a packed motorway like the M6, going to Penrith on a train, even worse on a coach, sitting in an airport or killing time on a ferry often depresses my enthusiasm to go.

I have overcome this by doing a 'deal' with my wife, if I waver, she gets stroppy with me or 'pushes' me out of the door in some other way. I will also sometimes get a Skype call from my son as well. Its always worked so far.

When at home, I have said for years that I must get out and about every single day! Again, my wife helps me to do this if I get into falter mode thinking. The most likely days for me to 'make an excuse' are Thursday's and Sunday's. Wednesday's and Saturday's are my evenings at the pub!

I've recently given myself a project, which I'm really enjoying, to record all of my off road running routes on my Wikiloc app. I've done 9  so far, 3 to go! That gets me out of the house without any trouble at all.

FTSTTLB

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Yes, I do. And it's silly because I feel much better after a (short) walk instead of just being a couch potato or sitting behind a computer or smartphone too long.

Did went for a long walk yesterday though, even though the weather was rather horrible

pleb

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Depends on the weather.

GinAndPlatonic

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I love to plan a walk and I`m lucky I can usually choose a day with good weather. I have noticed that as I have gotten older my energy levels drop from mid afternoon, so I get up early & start early.
The problem I find is the same as you gun, in that, it is the travelling for the walks that puts me off as it tires me a tad before even starting..I love the Beacons and Wales in general but driving there can be a couple of hours & even though I enjoy most walks. I start getting sleepy on my return home..with four hours total driving time for the day.Of late I often plan walks closer to home because of this, & must say many have been great, but I do miss planning walks in the hillson those days before walking.. :-\

Maggot

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No, it's my 'me time' (well me and the Beagle).


I am ok with motivation to go out riding or walking.  Going to work can be an issue sometimes!

BuzyG

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Not much. One of lifesl fresh air brigade.  Rather be outside in a storm, than stuck at my desk.  MrsG takes more persuading.

fernman

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It's a sign of old age, or it could be depression, when you start to lose interest or motivation for the hobbies and pastimes that used to fill your time.

A problem of mine has always been that I can have too much of something, then I lose interest in it, particularly if I have "peaked" at it, and my remedy has been to deliberately hold myself back from reaching that peak, leaving some things still to be done.

BuzyG

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It's a sign of old age, or it could be depression, when you start to lose interest or motivation for the hobbies and pastimes that used to fill your time.

A problem of mine has always been that I can have too much of something, then I lose interest in it, particularly if I have "peaked" at it, and my remedy has been to deliberately hold myself back from reaching that peak, leaving some things still to be done.


Your last point is very well made.  I always try to make sure I have a goal, a reason for being out.  Be it X hundred meters of accent. Or simply tor bagging or practicing a particular skill in unusually bad weather. It all adds to the day and adds variation.

gunwharfman

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I accept it could be my age, not depression in my case though, I've never experienced that before. I've thought it could be something to do with routine, knowing in advance what its going to be like, the novelty of travel (on trains, jets, cars and coaches) has worn off, now its a chore for me.

When I'm at the start of a hike I have no problems at all.

Dovegirl

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I don't lack the motivation to get out and about as I love being out there. I agree though that the travel logistics of getting to walks are sometimes a bit off-putting but I feel that if I start thinking it's too much of an effort I'll be on a downward spiral.

Dread

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I don't drive so a walk for me usually involves poring over train and bus timetables. I'm a couple of steps removed from a trainspotter but i do love train travel especially on the smaller lines. The getting there is all part of it to me. I recently went walking in Upper Wharfdale which involved a bus to Leeds, train to Skipton, bus to Grassington then a bus to Buckden. I spent as much time getting there and back as i did on the hills but to me this is all part of the adventure. The little bus to Buckden is an amazing trip. I really love the Sheffield to Edale line, it always puts me a great mood of expectation. Sitting back chomping on the sandwich which was supposed to be my lunch,watching the Peak District roll by is pure motivation.

Ralph

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Dread, I totally understand what you say about the Hope Valley line. I've travelled this for 40+ years and still get a buzz as I approach Grindleford on my way to Edale, glad someone else gets it.

fernman

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I accept it could be my age, not depression in my case though, I've never experienced that before. I've thought it could be something to do with routine, knowing in advance what its going to be like, the novelty of travel (on trains, jets, cars and coaches) has worn off, now its a chore for me.

When I'm at the start of a hike I have no problems at all.

I'd say that is definitely an age thing. Speaking personally, in my ordinary everyday life I'm always full of interest in everything I see around me - weather, trees, birds, plants, cars, buildings, but most of all, people, I'm a dedicated people-watcher.
But since having had early retirement forced on me I've been doing these things for a few years now, and lately I'm finding that my walks to the shops or short outings on local transport are becoming just a same-old routine with less to look forward to, I've done them so many times before.

Though I'm the same as you on walks, GWM. Last week I set off from a car park for a 7.25 miles walk on a bright but cold day with a spring in my step!

Dread

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Dread, I totally understand what you say about the Hope Valley line. I've travelled this for 40+ years and still get a buzz as I approach Grindleford on my way to Edale, glad someone else gets it.


I am now sat on that very train on my way to Hope. In a nice piece of irony a thread about low motivation has motivated me to end my winter hibernation, stretch my legs and hit the peaks. Going to walk Win Hill and around Ladybower. It's a bit blowy but the sun is shining. Thanks to another walkingforum thread i picked up a Marmot Precip (on offer for 30 in the JD Sports clearance sale) so I'm hoping it rains. Just a bit.

sussamb

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Good price for a Precip  O0
Where there's a will ...