Author Topic: Stove and compact pot  (Read 2597 times)

richardh1905

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Re: Stove and compact pot
« Reply #15 on: 20:37:52, 17/04/19 »
Crikey your stove costs almost as much as a decent tent!

It was a retirement gift from my employer of 10 years - I was allowed to choose.

No way would I spend that much on a stove, and I recommend that you don't either!


I'm not joking about it sounding like a jet engine - quiet it is not.
« Last Edit: 20:42:00, 17/04/19 by richardh1905 »

richardh1905

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Re: Stove and compact pot
« Reply #16 on: 20:41:09, 17/04/19 »

After seeing that you intend cooking food too, go for gas. Nice and simple, easily adjustable, resealable screw top cartridges widely available.

sussamb

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Re: Stove and compact pot
« Reply #17 on: 21:07:12, 17/04/19 »
This attracted my attention too but this worried me about it:

However, it performed poorly in our 8-10mph wind test, when it burned 1 oz of fuel in 30 minutes and did not boil the water.



There are always ways to shield a stove though, including just using your rucsac  O0
Where there's a will ...

Jim Parkin

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Re: Stove and compact pot
« Reply #18 on: 21:22:24, 17/04/19 »
There is the Trangia Mini

I remember one cold, blustery day on the summit of Helvellyn a couple produced their Trangia Mini and made bacon butties & mugs of tea with no bother

I think it would be worthwhile for you to visit a couple of large camping shops and see the things in the flesh. Ask the staff, they're usually pleasant & helpful
For lighting buy a pack of 4 or 5 plastic disposable lighters from a discount store.
Or use a firesteel. But they're not quite as easy as they look; watch videos and get some practice

I've just seen that Go Outdoors have extra discount on some gear, inc cooking, till 23 April
I have a Trangia Mini (aka Trangia-28, as an aside, does anyone understand why larger Trangias have smaller numbers?) and I like it - 300g and small enough with the pot and frying pan to fit in a rucsac top pocket, or possibly even a side pocket.  However I've found it pretty tempremental in the wind when testing it without a windshield. 



Owen

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Re: Stove and compact pot
« Reply #19 on: 21:24:20, 17/04/19 »
After some reading so far I've come to the conclusion that expecting a stove to cook tins of curry well and perform well in the wind is asking too much. Do you disagree? It seems small cannister stoves are what you want for simmering but they can't get a simmer going in even 10 mph wind. Integrated cannister stoves are great when it's windy but will burn a tin of curry rather than cook it. Am I wrong?


I think you're over thinking this a bit. Get a gas stove most of the hundreds on the market will do what you want. Jetboilers are good and because they are attached to the pan to boil water quite fast, they are however not so good for most cooking also their quite expensive. I use a cheap vango remote stove and a homemade windshield. I don't use noticeably more gas than my friends jetboiler. For making a windshield [size=78%]https://www.backpackinglight.co.uk/cooking-accessories/QE101.html[/size] I use a remote type stove because I find canister topped stoves are tippy. If you use this type don't make the windshield too long, it should only go 3/4 of the way around the stove not all the way round. Otherwise the canister can get too hot.

Jim Parkin

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Re: Stove and compact pot
« Reply #20 on: 21:35:42, 17/04/19 »
After some reading so far I've come to the conclusion that expecting a stove to cook tins of curry well and perform well in the wind is asking too much. Do you disagree? It seems small cannister stoves are what you want for simmering but they can't get a simmer going in even 10 mph wind. Integrated cannister stoves are great when it's windy but will burn a tin of curry rather than cook it. Am I wrong?

This attracted my attention too but this worried me about it:
There are stoves that can do both.  They just need some type of windshield, which can be integral to the stove. (see Owen's post above) But I'd argue that even if the stove was fine without a windshield, you'd want one to shield the pot itself - it's a bit wasteful and slow to heat the bottom of the pot, whilst cooling the sides.  A metal windshield will also reflect some of the heat back to the stove as well.  One morning last summer, I managed to use a windsheld all around my Trangia mini and use that with an aluminium pie case on top to make a bit of an oven that heated my croissants whilst I was also boiling my water underneath. 

A "slow" stove in shelter can often beat a fast stove in the wind. 
« Last Edit: 21:41:55, 17/04/19 by Jim Parkin »

Jim Parkin

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Re: Stove and compact pot
« Reply #21 on: 21:41:40, 17/04/19 »

There are always ways to shield a stove though, including just using your rucsac  O0
I've never got on with using my rucsac - gusty wind tends to veer all over the place in my experience, and I don't like the idea of the flames blowing onto the fabric.  Mind you, when I was a teenager, I used a Peak1 pressurised petrol stove (a present) and it was very fast, but also terrifying.  That probably put me off using rucsacs - especially as the stove was pretty good in the wind - a quarter of the stove might blow out at any time but the remaing parts were good

Rob Goes Walking

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Re: Stove and compact pot
« Reply #22 on: 21:46:59, 17/04/19 »

I think you're over thinking this a bit.
...
I use a remote type stove because I find canister topped stoves are tippy. If you use this type don't make the windshield too long, it should only go 3/4 of the way around the stove not all the way round. Otherwise the canister can get too hot.

I was under thinking it at the start, I almost bought a jetboil which isn't what I want.

Never heard of a remote canister stove until you posted. They do look good, thanks.

Little bit concerned about windshield and over heating canister but if people are doing it without blowing them up...

Thanks Jim Parkin good to know.

Jim Parkin

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Re: Stove and compact pot
« Reply #23 on: 21:56:51, 17/04/19 »
I was under thinking it at the start, I almost bought a jetboil which isn't what I want.

Never heard of a remote canister stove until you posted. They do look good, thanks.

Little bit concerned about windshield and over heating canister but if people are doing it without blowing them up...

Thanks Jim Parkin good to know.
The ones with the integral windshields that I know of are either remote stoves (little risk of heating the canister) or ones right round the burner, where the windshield itself keeps the heat off the canister. 

I got my daughter a remote canister stove for her last birthday  - she's getting into DofE and enjoying the associated expeditions etc.  Further to Owen's comments about those being less tippy, they also tend to be lower (after all, they're not sitting on top of a canister) so the wind speed is often a bit lower for them anyway. 


To be clear - the stove I surrounded with a windshield was a meths one - the Trangia-28

Rob Goes Walking

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Re: Stove and compact pot
« Reply #24 on: 22:01:13, 17/04/19 »
Thanks Jim Parkin again. I had just about settled on the MSR WINDPRO II WITH WINDSHIELD when you posted the stove you got for your daughter which is almost half the price and looks just as good. What does she use for a windshield?

Edit: I've discovered Alpkit sell one.
« Last Edit: 22:04:26, 17/04/19 by Rob Goes Walking »

Jim Parkin

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Re: Stove and compact pot
« Reply #25 on: 22:09:37, 17/04/19 »
I've suggested she uses a concertina windshield like this from Amazon
https://www.amazon.co.uk/Plates-Foldable-Outdoor-Camping-Cooker/dp/B00JA9WKHI/ref=sr_1_fkmrnull_2
You can get them half as high, if you want easier packing

beefy

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DRIP COFFINS  :D

Rob Goes Walking

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Re: Stove and compact pot
« Reply #27 on: 07:05:59, 18/04/19 »

http://www.walkingforum.co.uk/index.php?topic=30901.0

Thanks beefy. I'd decided to go with the MSR Windpro II anyway but I nearly didn't...

For anyone else reading this and thinking of getting a Koro beefy reports they can be dangerous, read his thread!

beefy

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Re: Stove and compact pot
« Reply #28 on: 07:10:23, 18/04/19 »
Thanks beefy. I'd decided to go with the MSR Windpro II anyway but I nearly didn't...

For anyone else reading this and thinking of getting a Koro beefy reports they can be dangerous, read his thread!
Looks good rob but a tad heavy for us wild campers, we use the msr pocket rocket  O0
DRIP COFFINS  :D

alan de enfield

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Re: Stove and compact pot
« Reply #29 on: 08:03:22, 18/04/19 »
I've suggested she uses a concertina windshield like this from Amazon
https://www.amazon.co.uk/Plates-Foldable-Outdoor-Camping-Cooker/dp/B00JA9WKHI/ref=sr_1_fkmrnull_2
You can get them half as high, if you want easier packing



Identical one on Ebay 3.75 (UK supplier)


https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/10-Plates-Foldable-Outdoor-Camping-Cooker-Gas-Picnic-Stove-Wind-Shield-Screen-Si/382422699485?ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT&_trksid=p2057872.m2749.l2649


The Amazon one is from China so you'll be waiting 4-8 weeks.
The Irish one is 2-3 day delivery





I also have the 'lower' version (9-plate) and it is not high enough to be effective on a stove that screws into the top of the cartridge (fine for the remote' stoves.
I also find that 9 or 10 plates is far too many to go around my stove/cartridge/pan and have reduced then down to 4 or 5 'plates' (halving the weight)


I have used cut up 'Disposable Turkey Trays' but getting it close enough to act as a wind shield meant virtually leaning it onto the pan which resulted in burning holes thru the wind shield - OK for the occasional use but for longer camps the free standing 9 or 10 plate wind shields are the way to go (but a bit heavier than the Turkey Tray)
« Last Edit: 08:08:23, 18/04/19 by alan de enfield »