Author Topic: My pole experience ( not for the faint hearted or those short of time)  (Read 2966 times)

Bigfoot_Mike

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It might be closer to fifty when I have a shift on. Speed isnít just about stride length, but also leg speed. I am not that towering - just over 6 feet - although I look taller next to my wife, who is under 5 feet tall. I am always telling her she should be able to keep up, as she should be able to move her shorter legs faster than mine. I just believe there is a minimum walking speed for an individual without falling over. Once you have started moving you need to get your legs into position quickly enough that gravity doesnít leave you flat on your face.

Rob Goes Walking

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It might be closer to fifty when I have a shift on. Speed isnít just about stride length, but also leg speed.

One multiplied by the other (if you treat leg speed as linear) unless I'm mistaken. The proper math would use step frequency? I think leg speed is easier to increase than stride length if I were minded to lose sight of you motoring off into the distance later than I currently would, I've tried increasing both and find leg speed is more of a drain on my cardiovascular system where as stride length fatigues the muscles more.
« Last Edit: 19:49:35, 24/04/19 by Rob Goes Walking »

fernman

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My twopenceworth: Rhythm is one thing I haven't seen mentioned in the foregoing posts in this thread, unless I missed it. As a dedicated two-poles user for more than 15 years, I find that I can get into a good steady walking rhythm when I'm on the flat, be it tarmack, a track or a good trodden path. Without the poles I tend to walk very "untidily", with fluctuating speed and failing to keep to the straightest course.

Stube

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I'm pushing 70 and overweight but my knees are good (thank god).

I don't use poles for day walks don't need them and tend to get left behind!

I always take them when backpacking. I find them useful on ascents, descents and muddy slopes. On flat smooth surfaces I find them a nuisance - even with a 15kg pack!

However they have saved me from serious falls and injury. I find them most useful when climbing over wire fences or stepstiles I don't have top posts, which is the norm in the south. They are useful adjuncts to your tent when camping.

I do find that on the rare occasions that I use my heavy pair (600g) I get a serious upper body workout. My regular pair are 300g the pair.

ninthace

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I'm sure it is not true for the good folk in this forum but virtually everybody I see with poles are not using them properly.  The main faults I see are not wearing the wrist loops correctly, wrong length and just using them as props rather than getting any power from them.
Solvitur Ambulando

April

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I'm sure it is not true for the good folk in this forum but virtually everybody I see with poles are not using them properly.  The main faults I see are not wearing the wrist loops correctly, wrong length and just using them as props rather than getting any power from them.

You could be talking about me  :)

I never use the wrist straps, I find them irritating. I don't think of my poles as something to give me power. I use them to give me stability and make me feel confident on uneven or steep ground.
"Who would've thought...... you are light and darkness coming through" words by Tim Armstrong

pdstsp

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I do use the straps, but don't use poles for power.  I use them for stability and balance on ascents and feel that they allow me to walk more rhythmically, and for balance and to ease the pressure on knees and hips on descents.  Brilliant for bog-hopping too.

Owen

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.  Brilliant for bog-hopping too.


Not something we need to do very often here but when it comes to big river crossings poles are a god send.

Dread

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I'm a recent convert to poles. I wish that I had taken them up earlier but, to be honest,  I was too self conscious, feeling that they were for the elderly. I agree that if you want to feel the full benefit you should use the straps. That way you can spread the effort across your whole body. Essentially you have two legs worked by  your bottom half and two extra worked by your top. You also spread any impact out. Giving yourself more stability and traction, getting your whole body to do the walking and easing the impact on your joints. There's no downside really.

April

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I agree that if you want to feel the full benefit you should use the straps. That way you can spread the effort across your whole body.

I have used poles for perhaps twenty years? I have used them with the straps and without them and can't say I noticed any difference except when I use the straps they irritate my hands. People are different; there is no wrong or right way to use poles, some people like to use the straps some don't.
"Who would've thought...... you are light and darkness coming through" words by Tim Armstrong

ninthace

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I have used poles for perhaps twenty years? I have used them with the straps and without them and can't say I noticed any difference except when I use the straps they irritate my hands. People are different; there is no wrong or right way to use poles, some people like to use the straps some don't.
  Pacerpoles next time?  More comfortable than the ski stick style to hold and no irritating wrist straps.  They can be held loosely with dropping them and if you do they have a bungee loop.  That's the way I went after I got sore areas across the back of my wrists.  They are pricey but are very hard wearing and have excellent after sales.
Solvitur Ambulando

Bigfoot_Mike

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Pacerpoles are what I use as well. I got used to them very quickly and prefer not having straps.

Dread

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I have used poles for perhaps twenty years? I have used them with the straps and without them and can't say I noticed any difference except when I use the straps they irritate my hands. People are different; there is no wrong or right way to use poles, some people like to use the straps some don't.


That's true. Some don't use the straps because they don't like the feel. Others like to be able to easily move their hands up and down the pole depending on whether they are going uphill or down. In my, admittedly fairly short,  experience not using the straps is like not lacing up your boots, perfectly reasonable but not really using the equipment to its full potential. I also tried both methods and found that having the strap under my wrist gave better results but as you rightly say, people are different.

ninthace

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When I used conventional walking poles I found that I needed wrist loops to get the finger tip control I needed to direct my pole tip to exactly where I wanted it  I also needed the loops to get the additional arm power for climbing up hill and maintaining a good pace on the flat.  Loops would be less critical if you walked taking your time but that is not my personal style.
Solvitur Ambulando

April

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  Pacerpoles next time?  More comfortable than the ski stick style to hold and no irritating wrist straps.  They can be held loosely with dropping them and if you do they have a bungee loop.  That's the way I went after I got sore areas across the back of my wrists.  They are pricey but are very hard wearing and have excellent after sales.

Perhaps  :) I have had a look at the website and I am interested in the blurb about posture, I know I am guilty of slouching and not keeping a good posture.

I am happy with the poles I use mind, Alpkit Carbonlight poles. They are the lightest you can buy I think. I only use them for uneven ground and on some ascents and descents, they are stored in my pack the rest of the time so they may last for a number of years yet.
"Who would've thought...... you are light and darkness coming through" words by Tim Armstrong