Author Topic: Waterproof socks  (Read 842 times)

sussamb

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Waterproof socks
« on: 18:45:59, 27/04/19 »
Good idea or not?  Never tried any but wondering if they work.  Advantages/disadvantages?
Where there's a will ...

phil1960

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Re: Waterproof socks
« Reply #1 on: 18:55:52, 27/04/19 »
I did try some Sealskin waterproof socks Jon but hated how they felt on my feet, one wear and they were donated to my youngest son for work, have to say though the combo of boots, gaiters and a bit of care have generally kept my feet dry  O0
Touching from a distance, further all the time.

archaeoroutes

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Re: Waterproof socks
« Reply #2 on: 19:06:48, 27/04/19 »
For general walking, I've never got on with them. Not comfortable enough (though this was quite a few years ago).
I did try them for jobs where I knew I was going to be standing in water most of the day (eg. teaching river crossings, water searches, etc). Was better than normal socks, but not enough to be worth actually buying a pair when I gave the borrowed ones back. Now when I have those kinds of jobs I just use my neoprene socks from caving and my feet stay toasty.

On the other hand, I love my Sealskinz gloves. They are originals, the thick woven ones. As with the socks, they aren't designed to stop water reaching you, just they themselves don't soak it up. Good for general use and brilliant when having to plunge a hand into water and then carry on for the rest of the day.
Walking routes visiting ancient sites in Britain's uplands: http://www.archaeoroutes.co.uk

fernman

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Re: Waterproof socks
« Reply #3 on: 20:17:56, 27/04/19 »
PROS:They do keep your feet dry when they're fairly new.

CONS: If you dunk your foot in water that comes over the top of the sock, the inside will never dry out for the rest of your trip, and it will smell like rotting cardboard too.
They're expensive.
They have a relatively short life before they start leaking. I'm lucky if they last me for three multiple-day walks.
Even though I wear mine over a thin-to-medium pair of synthetic material walking socks, they are not as comfortable as a liner sock / loopstitch wool sock combination.

Having said that, I wouldn't be without them for my trips to soggy Wales. While they work they're worth it.

ninthace

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Re: Waterproof socks
« Reply #4 on: 20:31:32, 27/04/19 »
Never had the need - only time I have had wet feet was from falling in bog up to my thigh.  More of a boots and gaiters person.
Solvitur Ambulando

sussamb

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Re: Waterproof socks
« Reply #5 on: 20:49:06, 27/04/19 »
Me too so far  O0
Where there's a will ...

fernman

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Re: Waterproof socks
« Reply #6 on: 22:28:52, 27/04/19 »
Never had the need....................More of a boots and gaiters person.

That's OK until your boots aren't so new and the water gets through them, as mine always do no matter how much I spray them and wax them*. From the end of day one onwards they are like lumps of saturated leather. That's why I keep buying Sealskinz.

(*Next pair will be GTX)

ninthace

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Re: Waterproof socks
« Reply #7 on: 23:53:41, 27/04/19 »
That's OK until your boots aren't so new and the water gets through them, as mine always do no matter how much I spray them and wax them*. From the end of day one onwards they are like lumps of saturated leather. That's why I keep buying Sealskinz.

(*Next pair will be GTX)
I have been luckier.  I clean and grease my Altberg boots after almost every trip and every evening on multi-day trips if I can. They have done well over 2000 miles, mostly in the Pennies, Lakes and the SW Moors.  They have been resoled once.  They look a bit used now but the leather is still good and they donít leak even though the manufacturer tells me my toes have finally worn a hole in the membrane.
Mrs N has a set of Altbergs that are even older than mine with similar mileage.  They too are on their second set of soles. Granted the leather is starting to crack where it was deformed to fit her feet back in 2012 but they donít leak either. 
I use Ledergris green top day to day and every so often I work a bit of Ledergris red top into the areas that flex most and always finish with a buff with a brush or cloth.
Previously I have had Mammut and Meindl boots. They did not last as long but they never leaked.  I think initial quality and the care you lavish on them must have a bearing on when they start to leak.
Solvitur Ambulando

fernman

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Re: Waterproof socks
« Reply #8 on: 08:31:56, 28/04/19 »
membrane

One word gives it away!

ninthace

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Re: Waterproof socks
« Reply #9 on: 09:16:30, 28/04/19 »
One word gives it away!
But even with it worn through we still donít get saturated leather or wet feet.
Solvitur Ambulando

archaeoroutes

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Re: Waterproof socks
« Reply #10 on: 12:14:47, 28/04/19 »
In my experience, the Goretex membrane in fabric boots only lasts a few trips. Fine grit gets into the weave, and with the constant flexing it wears through rapidly. My current super-lightweight books have a kind of thin rubbery layer on the outside to protect the Goretex (it can't actually be rubber as they are very breathable).
My best boots for long-term waterproofness have been nubuck leather with Goretex inside. The leather shed most water and protected the Goretex, which dealt with any real long soaks. Almost 20 years of abuse and they are only just starting to fail (even then only when standing in a ford too long).
Walking routes visiting ancient sites in Britain's uplands: http://www.archaeoroutes.co.uk

astaman

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Re: Waterproof socks
« Reply #11 on: 15:30:27, 28/04/19 »
I agree with the general view that the waterproofing is just not durable enough to withstand the pressures on them from walking. And they're not that comfortable compared with good Smartwool, Bridgedale, etc, etc. I did use them on a cycle tour once inside my cycling shoes and they worked quite well for that. The weather was wet but a bit warm for neoprene overshoes.

fernman

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Re: Waterproof socks
« Reply #12 on: 16:31:38, 28/04/19 »
In my experience, the Goretex membrane in fabric boots only lasts a few trips. Fine grit gets into the weave, and with the constant flexing it wears through rapidly. My current super-lightweight books have a kind of thin rubbery layer on the outside to protect the Goretex (it can't actually be rubber as they are very breathable).
My best boots for long-term waterproofness have been nubuck leather with Goretex inside. The leather shed most water and protected the Goretex, which dealt with any real long soaks. Almost 20 years of abuse and they are only just starting to fail (even then only when standing in a ford too long).

Care to share the brands of both of these?

archaeoroutes

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Re: Waterproof socks
« Reply #13 on: 17:15:10, 28/04/19 »
Care to share the brands of both of these?
My mountain boots are La Sportiva Guides. Don't know what the current equivalent is as these were bought almost 20 years ago - a quick look on the la Sportiva site and the Karakoram Evo GTX looks the most similar. They are nubuck leather outers, Goretex membrane, then an insulating liner.
My lightweight boots are Inov8 Roclite 325s. I use them for summer walking (no climbing) and when I have to drive and/or run as part of it. They even got used as my normal shoes during the snow due to the good treads allied with comfort. They've had almost two years of use now. I used them in absolutely torrential rain and strong winds on Snowdon before Christmas and they got soaked (rain running down my legs and into them - not their fault) but they were bone dry the next morning having just left them in my room in the YHA overnight.


The failed membranes I was referring to are personal experience from brands including Salomon, North Face, Merrel and Scarpa. I also encounter it frequently with clients and fellow walkers.
Walking routes visiting ancient sites in Britain's uplands: http://www.archaeoroutes.co.uk

Bigfoot_Mike

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Re: Waterproof socks
« Reply #14 on: 18:04:48, 28/04/19 »
I have a Goretex membrane in my new Altbergs, but have yet to try them out in wet weather. My now defunct Scarpa boots did several thousand miles over the year and I was never aware of them leaking. In those days there wa no such thing as a Goretex liner. Good boot care, including plenty of Nikwax seemed to keep the water out - unless I stepped in something wet that went over the top of my boots. I would be quite happy with no membrane and doubt I will worry when the membrane wears through. My old boots had no tread left and the tops were so cut up that it wasnít worth getting them repaired. Also, either my feet have got wider or Scarpas are now much narrower, so Altberg seems the best way forward.