Author Topic: Sleeping mat  (Read 1563 times)

Owen

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Re: Sleeping mat
« Reply #15 on: 17:22:15, 02/05/19 »

I often wonder if those buying a 'short' pad to save the odd few grams, are the same folk that cut their toothbrush handle off, squeeze 1/2 of their toothpaste out before they start, etc etc.


Don't cut your toothbrush in half, it'll be too short to use.


Get free sample toothpaste mini tubes from the dentist.


Before the Neo Air I used short a self- inflating thermarest for years. I side sleep and often pull my knees up into the fetal position so a short mat is fine but not a narrow one. 

fernman

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Re: Sleeping mat
« Reply #16 on: 17:32:55, 02/05/19 »
I often wonder if those buying a 'short' pad to save the odd few grams, are the same folk that cut their toothbrush handle off, squeeze 1/2 of their toothpaste out before they start, etc etc.

Yes, they are....
v
v
v
....speaking from experience  :-[

archaeoroutes

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Re: Sleeping mat
« Reply #17 on: 19:39:04, 02/05/19 »
3/4 length mats don't just save weight and bulk. They are useful on a slope because you can have your heels and head (bag of spare clothes pillow) in contact with the ground to stop sliding.
Walking routes visiting ancient sites in Britain's uplands: http://www.archaeoroutes.co.uk

Becky68

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Re: Sleeping mat
« Reply #18 on: 04:42:08, 03/05/19 »
Wow! What a lot of replies! I'll try to answer some of the questions. I'm hiking in a couple of weeks' time so won't need a super-duper warm one, but comfort and lightweight are my top priorities I think. I've tried a Vango self inflating one in the past which only got to about an inch in thickness and I'm getting to the age when that's just not think enough! It is also too bulky and I ended up strapping it to my rucksack, which, I can see now is a cardinal crime!  :)  I want lightweight, comfy and small size so will check out some of the suggestions and welcome any specific models. I'm a side and back sleeper because I don't tend to sleep much in a tent but am hoping that will change after a long day's hike! Thanks for all the suggestions.

richardh1905

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Re: Sleeping mat
« Reply #19 on: 08:28:58, 03/05/19 »

The Lidl mat that I mentioned is 6cm thick, and very comfortable for side and back sleeping. As I said earlier, similar lightweight blow up mats without insulation are available online (although I cannot find any with longitudinal tubes).


Do check the weight of some of the cheaper mats before buying though - they can be heavy!
« Last Edit: 08:44:12, 03/05/19 by richardh1905 »

richardh1905

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Re: Sleeping mat
« Reply #20 on: 08:39:06, 03/05/19 »

Avoid anything like THIS if you want a good night's sleep!




alan de enfield

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Re: Sleeping mat
« Reply #21 on: 08:40:04, 03/05/19 »
I bought one of these, but found its not ideal for a 'side-sleeper' as my shoulder and hip still touch the ground, I had to put a 'pad' underneath it at the critical points to try and make it more comfortable.
I am 92kgs in weight - maybe a 'less-robust;' person would not have the same problem.

It actually rolls up smaller than they say - 10" x 3" is the maximum.







Here is a very similar one (mine is no longer available)
This one has a pillow as well (one thing less to carry)

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Ultralight-Inflatable-Sleeping-Mat-Camping-Air-Pad-Roll-Bed-Mattress-Pillow/264260156488?_trkparms=aid%3D555018%26algo%3DPL.SIM%26ao%3D1%26asc%3D20190212102350%26meid%3Db4e6ad2880d2466abcfdf0ee67cb7ee9%26pid%3D100012%26rk%3D2%26rkt%3D12%26mehot%3Dpp%26sd%3D264034444483%26itm%3D264260156488&_trksid=p2047675.c100012.m1985
« Last Edit: 08:46:53, 03/05/19 by alan de enfield »

Stube

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Re: Sleeping mat
« Reply #22 on: 10:21:34, 03/05/19 »
One thing that's not been mentioned. A synthetic sleeping bag will provide more cushioning and insulation from the ground than a down one. Its extra weight can be offset against a lighter mat.


alan de enfield

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Re: Sleeping mat
« Reply #24 on: 12:51:46, 03/05/19 »

Ah, but is such a mat, along with other inexpensive blow-up ones, going to insulate your body from the cold ground, which I believe is a major reason for using a ground mat, along with comfort of course?



No - it will have an R-Factor less than 1, it will 'drain your body heat away', but for Summer time use its OK.


Its interesting to note that a sleeping bag only achieves it 'ratings' when fully 'insulated' from the ground.


Info from "Exped" :-





 Heat loss is dramatically reduced with down insulation inside the mat, as demonstrated by EMPA, the Swiss Federal Labaratories for Materials Testing and Research, and field tests by expeditions. The thick cushion of air also provides comfort and smooths out uneven ground. And as down compresses extremely well, Downmats packs smaller than other insulated mats.


Light and warm: The DownMat 7 has a R-Value of 5.9. At about the same weight a standard 2.5 cm self inflating mat only has a R-Value of 2.5. Further EMPA tests demonstrated that regular mats lose 3x more heat to cold ground than to the air. The conclusion: use a lighter weight sleeping bag with a DownMat to achieve consistent overall comfort, and still reduce weight and bulk!

https://www.gearx.com/blog/knowledge/hikingcamping/how-to-choose-a-sleeping-pad/


One feature of a sleeping pad that’s easy to overlook is insulation. The air in an inflatable pad or the dense foam in a closed-cell sleeping pad warms with your body heat and insulates you from the cold ground. Some sleeping pads also feature a heat-reflective material in their construction, which directs body heat back toward you rather than transferring it to the ground. Temperature ratings on sleeping bags are made with the assumption you are using a sleeping pad, which underscores their importance.




What is R-Value?
R-Value is a sleeping pad’s ability to insulate its user from the ground. This insulation is measured on a scale from 0 to 6.  The higher the R-value, the warmer it will be


Sleeping Pad R-Value Chart



gunwharfman

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Re: Sleeping mat
« Reply #25 on: 13:13:24, 03/05/19 »
All good advice except I could not go along with the idea of not worrying about cold coming up from the ground in the summer months. I would always buy with the view that one can be cold at any time of the year, the nights when you wouldn't have to worry I bet can be counted on one hand. If you get the purchase wrong you could end up buy two mattresses.

alan de enfield

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Re: Sleeping mat
« Reply #26 on: 15:00:05, 03/05/19 »
If you get the purchase wrong you could end up buy two mattresses.



Is that why I have a 'number' of rucksacks, sleeping bags, mattresses, tents, tarps, hammocks and assorted stoves and 'stuff' ?



I think (that for now) for me, I have finally got the combination of weight, comfort, warmth and convenience about right.


My choices would not suit some others, and vice versa.


Use what you feel comfortable with - but - you will need to experiment.

fernman

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Re: Sleeping mat
« Reply #27 on: 17:12:25, 03/05/19 »
What is R-Value?
R-Value is a sleeping pad’s ability to insulate its user from the ground. This insulation is measured on a scale from 0 to 6.  The higher the R-value, the warmer it will be


Armed with the above information that Alan supplied, I looked at the maker's site for my mat, which gives a Season Rating of 4 (I've always taken "season ratings" to be rather subjective) and a Tog Value of 3.9, but there is no R-Value.

Is there a way of comparing Tog Value wirh R-Value?

EDIT: I think I've found the answer to my question, I should have searched for it before asking. First I found a 2011 post on Backpackinglight asking about converting values, with a reply pointing them to Ultralightoutdoor gear where, it was said, both values are listed. They are indeed, I have found, although the R-Value is on the mat's description page while the Tog Value is on the specifications page.

Further searching found a 2010 press release from Multimat, headed "Don't be fooled by over-inflated R-Values" which makes interesting reading if you're fully awake and have half an hour to spare:
http://www.multimat.uk.com/articles/don-t-be-fooled-over-r-values
« Last Edit: 17:29:40, 03/05/19 by fernman »

gunwharfman

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Re: Sleeping mat
« Reply #28 on: 18:35:09, 03/05/19 »
Me too Alan, I seem to now have two or three of most things, Two tents, one bivi, three rucksacks, three warm full-zip jackets, three mattresses, three pairs of walking trousers, numerous socks, all bought as I learned more and more about the walking and hiking game.

I'm confident I've reached a plateau now, my spending is far less now because I now know (or at least I think I know) what I'm doing.

I certainly hope that by reading our views and experience this will help some people to spend less (or the same if they want to) and so have more funds for travel costs, beer, wine and the other entertainments en route.

I keep advising people on how to have the things that you want and need in life, for the lowest cost, but I could be easily accused of not practising what I preach.

Rob Goes Walking

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Re: Sleeping mat
« Reply #29 on: 19:04:09, 03/05/19 »
Personally, I love Thermarest 'self' inflating foam mats.

Got an example model? I looked at the NeoAir® All Season™ SV which is just air but compact and the DreamTime which was massive packed and weighed 3.5kg - I don't normally concern myself with weight but that's a lot for a mat.

I certainly hope that by reading our views and experience this will help some people to spend less (or the same if they want to) and so have more funds for travel costs, beer, wine and the other entertainments en route.

Alas if I ever go down this route I suspect I'll overspend...