Author Topic: Sleeping bag and boots for mountaineering/trekking  (Read 846 times)

TOMHOWA

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Decided to join the forum to rack your brains! Always been into hill walking and  trekking however this year decided to do a few long distance ones and get away from the smog and hectic city life.My first one went down like a lead balloon, essentially due to poor quality kit. Up in the Carneddaus and it got a bit nippy in the night, luckily I had spare warm clothes!So I am looking for advice on suitable sleeping bags that are lightweight yet warm. Earliest Iíd be going would be end of March and latest back end of October. So far I am looking at Alpkits range of down season three bags or Robens Icefall 2 to 4. Also new pair of boots so far considering Salomon Quest 4D based on reviews or a decent pair of Hanwags, Scarpa or B E S T A R D S.Any help or advice would be greatly appreciated.Thanks

dank86

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Re: Sleeping bag and boots for mountaineering/trekking
« Reply #1 on: 22:01:22, 09/05/19 »
Boots are very personal I recommend trying on as many as possible in a shop. I like Asolo and Scarpa but theyre not for everyone, theyre heaven for me but my be hell for you.


Alpkit do some nice sleeping bags, I recently took a gamble on one from cotswold outdoors, was reduced to £35 and is a 3 to 4 season bag and weighs 1.5kg. I used it on the Beacons way at the start of April (when the snow hit) and it did admirably, the only downfall is it was so nice i didnt want to get out in the mornings  ;D

gunwharfman

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Re: Sleeping bag and boots for mountaineering/trekking
« Reply #2 on: 11:44:43, 10/05/19 »
My way of looking at it is to consider that your sleeping bag and mattress are essentially intertwined, don't buy one without the other!

I have found by experience that if your mattress stops cold coming through the ground to your body then whatever sleeping bag you buy will be just that bit better at keeping you warm. I have no idea of the science of this but I'm no longer convinced that all warmth attempts should be made simply on the basis of what's on top of your body.

For my part, I have a Thermarest NeoAir, expensive, but for me worth it but its small downside is that it's not self-inflating. My self inflating and cheaper Thermarest Prolight is nearly as good, but I have to ensure the pressure is just right, too much air and its like sleeping on concrete, too little and my hip digs into the ground. Both are very good at insulating me from the ground cold.

I used to use a down sleeping bag but now use a down sleeping quilt, it has no head covering and no back to it, so its carry weight is very light and it's very compressible. It's all to do with personal choice in the end.

Over time my sleeping quilt seems to be losing its heat retaining qualities (the down over time has moved around as well) but I've solved that problem by securing a lightweight blanket (from Decathlon £5.99) over my torso area. I've cut it into a 3' x 3' area, it just attaches over my sleeping quilt when I need it. I want to progress to a thin down square but haven't found anything yet.

If I was to buy again I would buy a summer sleeping bag or quilt and work on the same principle to keep warm as I do during the day, by using layers when needed.

kinkyboots

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Re: Sleeping bag and boots for mountaineering/trekking
« Reply #3 on: 12:47:41, 10/05/19 »
Don't let your previous experience of the Altberg Defender having little ankle support put you off looking at Altberg boots. Your experience only confirms what I've stated here on a number of occasions. The Defender is ideal as a cheap way of getting a high quality full leather boot suitable for low level walking but for any higher level walking on more difficult terrain you need to be looking at their purpose built walking boot models which do have better ankle support.

If you want quality boots which will last you more than 1-2 years my advice would be to definitely go for a full leather boot with as little stitching as possible in preference to a leather/fabric combination boot.

I would suggest that you make the effort to have a close look at the Altberg range (you may need travel a fair distance to your nearest Premier dealer). They're not cheap but you will definitely not be disappointed with the build quality of any of them and occasional bargains are available online. As a guide I recently managed to buy a pair of Altberg Malham for £130 and a pair of Altberg Nordkapp for £157 from Gaynor Sports in their 30% Off RRP Easter Offer.

Depending on the type of walking you do most the following models may be suitable options. If the model of a boot made on the standard last doesn't quite fit or suit your particular foot shape, width and volume it's a fairly safe be that a boot made on either the A-Forme or G-Fit last will. All Altberg boots can be resoled if and when the need arises.

2-3 Season Boots
Altberg Fremington Men's 1412g RRP £179.99 (standard last with 5 width fittings) https://www.altberg.co.uk/product/the-fremington-mens-boot-mto/
Altberg Malham Men's 1344g RRP £184.99 (A-Forme last with 1 medium width fitting) https://www.altberg.co.uk/product/the-malham-mens-boot-mto/
Altberg Keld Unisex 1428g RRP £189.99 (G-Fit last with 1 wide width high volume fitting) https://www.altberg.co.uk/product/keld-boot-factory-stock/

3 Season Boots
Altberg Tethera Men's 1472g RRP £214.99 (standard last with 5 width fittings) https://www.altberg.co.uk/product/the-tethera-mens-boot-mto/
Altberg Nordkapp Unisex 1460g RRP £219.99 (A-Forme last with 1 medium width fitting) https://www.altberg.co.uk/product/factory-stock-nordkapp/
Altberg Kisdon Unisex 1622g RRP £219.99 (G-Fit last with 1 wide width high volume fitting) https://www.altberg.co.uk/product/kisdon-boot-factory-stock/

3-4 Season Boots
Altberg Mallerstang Unisex 1768g RRP £239.99 (standard last with 5 width fittings) https://www.altberg.co.uk/product/the-mallerstang-boot-mto/

Depending on which suits/fits your feet the best my personal preference for an excellent all rounder would be either the Tethera or Nordkapp. For me the Nordkapp shades it due to having the higher rubber rand which offers better protection to the leather at the front of the boot.
It's absolutely crucial that you get properly measured first and try them on before you buy. You can find your nearest stockist here https://www.altberg.co.uk/stockists/ The ones to look for are the Premier Retailers with the red flags on the map who tend to carry a wider range of stock. Wherever you choose to go make sure you phone before you go so you don't waste time and money travelling to look at something that's not in stock. Once you know which model, size and width fitting you require there are occasional bargains to be had online and eBay is always worth a look.

If the Altberg Fremington suits your feet Greaves Sports currently have them available in limited sizes and width fittings @ £135 with an additional up to 8% cashback available if ordered online via TopCashback.
https://www.greavessports.com/sports-c119/outdoor-c4881/footwear-c4883/altberg-m284

gunwharfman

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Re: Sleeping bag and boots for mountaineering/trekking
« Reply #4 on: 13:30:47, 10/05/19 »
Kinkyboots, you sure are a keen Altberg man! I'm sure they are first class boots but I could never bring myself to pay out more than £150 myself. I bought one pair at £150, never again, couldn't cope! Ever since I've managed to keep my boot purchases to less than £100 per time. I have had my good boots, not so good and ones that leak as well, but have had one benefit from of all of my boots (except my very first pair) they have all been very comfortable to wear and walk in.

kinkyboots

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Re: Sleeping bag and boots for mountaineering/trekking
« Reply #5 on: 15:04:58, 10/05/19 »
@gunwharfman

To me it's all about economics and long term value for money.

For my £150-£160 I would expect to get around 5 years or more use out of them with maybe one £50-£60 resole in that time - let's round that up and call it £250 for 5 years use = £50 per year.

From what I can see from your posts you're currently buying a pair £100 boots almost every year - over 5 years that's £500 = £100 per year.

If you look at it that way over a 5 year period your boots actually work out to be around twice as expensive as mine.  :o

I would also add that I've never had a problem of any sort with any of the Altberg boots I've bought, they have a decent second hand value and are easy to sell on if and when I fancy a change.

Each to their own but don't you think that might be something worth thinking about?  ;)

Patrick1

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Re: Sleeping bag and boots for mountaineering/trekking
« Reply #6 on: 15:20:46, 10/05/19 »
My wife recently bought an Alpkit Skyehigh 700 sleeping bag and has been pleased with it over several nights down to just above freezing. We were looking for a down bag of about 1kg with a comfort rating of at least a few degrees below zero and it looked like the best value such bag available at the moment, unless you get lucky with a special offer. I'd only say that its compression sack doesn't do it justice - it can go a lot smaller if you get a slightly smaller sack.


If you're prepared to wait, then Alpinetrek sometimes have some very good deals on down bags, but I think they sell end of line stock from elsewhere, so its a bit random what becomes available. However, I got an excellent Sea to Summit Talus II for half RRP from them last autumn.

ninthace

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Re: Sleeping bag and boots for mountaineering/trekking
« Reply #7 on: 15:45:40, 10/05/19 »
GW, I would second Kinkybootsí experience. Both my wife and I use Altberg boots. Both pairs were factory resoled, mine at around the 2000 mile mark and hers at around 1800 miles, and both pairs are still watertight despite both pairs now having done over 2000 miles.
Mrs N has real trouble finding comfortable footwear but absolutely swears by her  Fremingtons.  With luck and care, she should get as much as another 1500 miles out of them before the uppers finally die - her gait is hard on boots for some reason.  I reckon my Thetheras might be good for a bit more than that.

Solvitur Ambulando

TOMHOWA

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Re: Sleeping bag and boots for mountaineering/trekking
« Reply #8 on: 01:03:44, 11/05/19 »
@gunwharfman

To me it's all about economics and long term value for money.

For my £150-£160 I would expect to get around 5 years or more use out of them with maybe one £50-£60 resole in that time - let's round that up and call it £250 for 5 years use = £50 per year.

From what I can see from your posts you're currently buying a pair £100 boots almost every year - over 5 years that's £500 = £100 per year.

If you look at it that way over a 5 year period your boots actually work out to be around twice as expensive as mine.  :o

I would also add that I've never had a problem of any sort with any of the Altberg boots I've bought, they have a decent second hand value and are easy to sell on if and when I fancy a change.

Each to their own but don't you think that might be something worth thinking about?  ;)


Dont get me wrong [size=78%]the boots are great for lowland walking and are very good quality, with the exception of the ankle support but guessing that was a MOD contract situation to keep cost down to get signed up.  I prefer a high boot so will have a look about, a friend of mine really rates his B estards heís had them for three years and is a grouse keeper so go through all sorts and cover serious miles! Going to head to a decent outdoor store to get sized up and try a few on.[/size]

TOMHOWA

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Re: Sleeping bag and boots for mountaineering/trekking
« Reply #9 on: 01:07:53, 11/05/19 »
My wife recently bought an Alpkit Skyehigh 700 sleeping bag and has been pleased with it over several nights down to just above freezing. We were looking for a down bag of about 1kg with a comfort rating of at least a few degrees below zero and it looked like the best value such bag available at the moment, unless you get lucky with a special offer. I'd only say that its compression sack doesn't do it justice - it can go a lot smaller if you get a slightly smaller sack.


If you're prepared to wait, then Alpinetrek sometimes have some very good deals on down bags, but I think they sell end of line stock from elsewhere, so its a bit random what becomes available. However, I got an excellent Sea to Summit Talus II for half RRP from them last autumn.


The skyehigh 700 is the model I am looking at, Alpkit recommended the pipe dream 400 but reviews didnít seem great for it in comparison the the skyehigh 700. Might pop to my closest alpkit to take a look before deciding! Iíd rather be warm at night and Sacrifice on something else.
Will keep an eye out on Alpinetrek

taxino8

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Re: Sleeping bag and boots for mountaineering/trekking
« Reply #10 on: 07:26:23, 11/05/19 »

The skyehigh 700 is the model I am looking at, Alpkit recommended the pipe dream 400 but reviews didnít seem great for it in comparison the the skyehigh 700. Might pop to my closest alpkit to take a look before deciding! Iíd rather be warm at night and Sacrifice on something else.
Will keep an eye out on Alpinetrek
I have the Skyehigh 500, weighs less than a kg and I got it last year for £140.
Itís fine for three season use in the U.K. if youíre not a cold sleeper.

richardh1905

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Re: Sleeping bag and boots for mountaineering/trekking
« Reply #11 on: 07:52:22, 11/05/19 »
Kinkyboots, you sure are a keen Altberg man! I'm sure they are first class boots but I could never bring myself to pay out more than £150 myself. I bought one pair at £150, never again, couldn't cope! Ever since I've managed to keep my boot purchases to less than £100 per time. I have had my good boots, not so good and ones that leak as well, but have had one benefit from of all of my boots (except my very first pair) they have all been very comfortable to wear and walk in.



And this is the most important point of all.



I tend not to go for expensive boots either as much of my walking is mixed, with quite a bit of road walking thrown in, and I tend to wear down soles quickly - my modestly priced full leather Grisport Outlanders (£80) that I bought in late October are already showing serious signs of wear on the heel. At that price I will probably just buy another pair rather than get them re-soled, as they are a good 3 season boot - nice to have dry feet after a succession of disappointing fabric boots.


If I were walking mostly off road I perhaps would look at Altbergs, though.

kinkyboots

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Re: Sleeping bag and boots for mountaineering/trekking
« Reply #12 on: 08:02:36, 11/05/19 »

a friend of mine really rates his B estards heís had them for three years and is a grouse keeper so go through all sorts and cover serious miles! Going to head to a decent outdoor store to get sized up and try a few on.[/size]

The only problem with B estard boots is that they are a Spanish company with very few if any importers/retail outlets in the UK and little known in the UK making it almost impossible to see them and try before you buy.

SportPursuit currently have a flash sale on B estard boots. If you do go down that route make sure that you check out their Returns Policy before you commit to buying. NB You will need to join/sign up to the website in order to view the prices. You are welcome to use my personal invite link if you are not already a member. https://www.sportpursuit.com/join/kinkyboots

Everybody's feet are different and what suits/fits your friend's feet may not suit/fit your feet. It's probably best to start your search by doing your homework and checking out revews videos etc then go with an open mind and a shortlist of boots you like the look of. Treat any actual foot measurement only as a starting point for selecting sizes to try on. Every manufacturer's sizing is different and sometimes there are even sizing differences between the same size in different models from the same manufacturer.

The bottom line is that fit and comfort are everything when buying boots regardless of the size printed on the boot or box. If you can manage to find boots which remain waterproof throughout their life and are also hardwearing those are bonuses worth having and paying the extra for.
« Last Edit: 08:11:01, 11/05/19 by kinkyboots »

TOMHOWA

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Re: Sleeping bag and boots for mountaineering/trekking
« Reply #13 on: 11:53:56, 11/05/19 »
The only problem with B estard boots is that they are a Spanish company with very few if any importers/retail outlets in the UK and little known in the UK making it almost impossible to see them and try before you buy.

SportPursuit currently have a flash sale on B estard boots. If you do go down that route make sure that you check out their Returns Policy before you commit to buying. NB You will need to join/sign up to the website in order to view the prices. You are welcome to use my personal invite link if you are not already a member. https://www.sportpursuit.com/join/kinkyboots

Everybody's feet are different and what suits/fits your friend's feet may not suit/fit your feet. It's probably best to start your search by doing your homework and checking out revews videos etc then go with an open mind and a shortlist of boots you like the look of. Treat any actual foot measurement only as a starting point for selecting sizes to try on. Every manufacturer's sizing is different and sometimes there are even sizing differences between the same size in different models from the same manufacturer.

The bottom line is that fit and comfort are everything when buying boots regardless of the size printed on the boot or box. If you can manage to find boots which remain waterproof throughout their life and are also hardwearing those are bonuses worth having and paying the extra for.


Yeah I think i will go to a decent store and try a few on. Thanks for all the advice and link.