Author Topic: Rewilding Britain  (Read 5765 times)

richardh1905

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Rewilding Britain
« on: 10:35:05, 21/05/19 »
Interesting article in The Guardian today:
https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2019/may/21/rewild-quarter-uk-fight-climate-crisis-campaigners-urge

As well as the obvious environmental benefits, this will be wonderful for future generations of walkers!

I've signed the Government website petition in support of re-wilding.
Restore nature on a massive scale to help stop climate breakdown


WildAboutWalking - Join me on my walks through the wilder parts of Britain

richardh1905

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Re: Rewilding Britain
« Reply #1 on: 10:35:50, 21/05/19 »
..and Alladale in Sutherland looks wonderful!
WildAboutWalking - Join me on my walks through the wilder parts of Britain

ninthace

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Re: Rewilding Britain
« Reply #2 on: 10:59:43, 21/05/19 »
I am prepared to stop mowing my lawn if it helps. There are corners of my garden where rewinding is already well underway.
Solvitur Ambulando

barewirewalker

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Re: Rewilding Britain
« Reply #3 on: 11:40:57, 22/05/19 »
The first thing I notice about the overall tone of the article is 'how good it is going to be for farmers'. But is the subsidies really going go into the pocket of landowners? Also it is the NFU responding to the ideas suggested not the CLA, before I would make a commitment to an idea that seems intrinsically good, I would like to test the motives of the recipients of our taxes. The farmer would benefit from the popular commitment to this idea, if they are the ones working the land, should reward then go to the tax payer by being welcomed into the idyllic settings being fashioned out of our landscape. If the identity of the farmer is replaced by the landowner, we will see a group traditionally opposed to public access, whose track record shows little reversal of this mindset and sits on enormous wealth from increasing land values.

How much has pumping public money into the countryside played into the hands of landowners, as opposed to true farmers? The environments created by re-wilding can well be seen to be complimentary to leisure activities that benefit all, but how soon would we see it twisted to the advantage of those would argue that visitors are an unnecessary complication to true re-wilding.


   
BWW
Their Land is in Our Country.

Mel

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Re: Rewilding Britain
« Reply #4 on: 18:14:18, 22/05/19 »
I'm doing my "bit"....


My garden is already a nature reserve.  I hate gardening and the most I do is cut the grass and trim the shrubs.  Can't remember the last time I used weedkiller or any kind of chemical feed.  As a result I have loads of wildlife foraging and nesting and get a cracking crop of the sweetest brambles ever.


My neighbour, on the other hand, has a beautifully manicured lawn and wonderfully tended plants.  Yet very few birds use her bird feeders.  She can't understand why, despite me having a cat, all the birds choose my garden over hers.



Is the search over if you find nothing?
https://snailspacewalks.blogspot.com/

Bigfoot_Mike

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Re: Rewilding Britain
« Reply #5 on: 19:00:54, 22/05/19 »
My garden s similarly wild: grass, moss (probably more of this than grass), daisies, dandelions, clover, bushes and trees - plus a few randomly appearing wild flowers and fungi. We get quite a lot of birds and used to get loads of rabbits. The feral cats have reduced the number of rabbits significantly. We also get deer, red squirrels, hedgehogs, occasional foxes, voles and moles. One of neighbours has also spied pine martens on his camera trap, although we havenít seen one here. I prefer this to a bowling green in the back yard.

Mel

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Re: Rewilding Britain
« Reply #6 on: 19:25:13, 22/05/19 »
Aaah, yes... moss.  My front garden's full of the stuff  ;D


I remember scarifying the lawn a good few years ago to try and keep the front looking something like presentable (so it didn't show the rest of the street up) and ended up with a bald lawn, barring about 3 blades of grass  :D   :-[


Needless to say, I've not done it since  ::)


I bet you don't have flying snails though ...
Is the search over if you find nothing?
https://snailspacewalks.blogspot.com/

Bigfoot_Mike

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Re: Rewilding Britain
« Reply #7 on: 20:00:50, 22/05/19 »
Moss is generally green, so it is part of the lawn. The only flying snails would be those in the beaks of crows or gulls (which can fly off with a catís food bowl). Aberdeenshire gulls are also know as pterodactyls.

Jac

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Re: Rewilding Britain
« Reply #8 on: 07:39:46, 23/05/19 »

I bet you don't have flying snails though ...



Do tell...................... :)
So many paths yet to walk, so little time left

Dyffryn Ardudwy

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Re: Rewilding Britain
« Reply #9 on: 10:49:34, 23/05/19 »
The only problem i can envisage, with a tiny island the size of the Uk, trying to reduce our carbon footprint.
No sooner we are all made to drive electric vehicles, and other so called green lifestyle choices, the likes of India, China and the US, will increase their pollution levels, because we have reduced ours.

There's little point of us here in the Uk trying our level best, when the rest of the world are not following our example.

How do you remonstrate with developing superpowers such as China and India.

Until everyone goes GREEN, theres little or no point in tiny nations such as ourselves, trying our level best, when the real culprits are doing nothing, and intend doing nothing.


I am all for saving our beautiful countryside for future generations, but our token effort will amount to nothing.


Our CO2 footprint is non existent compared to the likes of India and China
« Last Edit: 10:52:37, 23/05/19 by Dyffryn Ardudwy »

Owen

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Re: Rewilding Britain
« Reply #10 on: 11:32:57, 23/05/19 »
So, we do nothing but wait until someone else blinks. And so ended life on earth.

ninthace

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Re: Rewilding Britain
« Reply #11 on: 12:40:16, 23/05/19 »
Indeed - the politics of despair that ignores the efforts being made here and elsewhere including the countries mentioned.
Solvitur Ambulando

richardh1905

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Re: Rewilding Britain
« Reply #12 on: 13:32:24, 23/05/19 »
The UK emits far more per capita than India and China.

To do nothing would be the ultimate act of betrayal of our children, and of future generations.
WildAboutWalking - Join me on my walks through the wilder parts of Britain

richardh1905

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Re: Rewilding Britain
« Reply #13 on: 13:34:00, 23/05/19 »
I didn't intend this thread to become a debate on climate change, by the way!
WildAboutWalking - Join me on my walks through the wilder parts of Britain

ninthace

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Re: Rewilding Britain
« Reply #14 on: 13:45:34, 23/05/19 »
Yes - back to rewilding.  How about some more exotic fauna as well as flora? 
Solvitur Ambulando