Author Topic: Walking Solo  (Read 2385 times)

pdstsp

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Re: Walking Solo
« Reply #15 on: 09:10:37, 27/05/19 »
Doolittle syndrome is an excellent name!!


I mostly walk alone for the reasons set out by many members above, and I love it.  I have two good friends who I walk with on occasion, which I enjoy as we are well suited in terms of experience and speed.


I have just spent 11 days walking the C2C with one of these friends and two other less experienced friends.  I was expecting this to be quite difficult, but everyone seemed to adjust well.  We found ourselves chatting at times, strung out for periods and then coming back together, generally when navigation was needed.  I was surprised how natural it felt.


Having said that, I don't think I'd like an organised group. Too much structure for me.


fit old bird

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Re: Walking Solo
« Reply #16 on: 09:30:43, 27/05/19 »
O0 For solo. I tend to be an ambler , so think I would frustrate others who walk faster than me and who don't get distracted by maps (if I see something close by that seems interesting,  then I usually make a detour to see what it is). I stop when I want to stop and eat when I want to eat etc.
But I truly enjoy plodding along chatting to other walkers when our paths coincide and frequently welcome their conversation and company.


This is a bit like me. I like solitude, but I can also be a chatter box. I will talk to complete strangers if I feel like talking, or quickly move on if I don't.


I need to eat when my stomach tells me to, if I don't I feel wobbly. I need several short eats, rather than one lunch break half way through the day. If I find a nice spot to sit down I take ten minutes and have a nibble and a drink.


If I see something which might look interesting on the map, I will turn off and take a look at it. If I see a sign which might reveal something interesting, curiosity will take me there.


ilona

astaman

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Re: Walking Solo
« Reply #17 on: 09:41:55, 27/05/19 »
Mostly I walk on my own but do occasional day walks with a friend. All my longer multi-day walks have been solo. I tend to walk alone for the range of the reasons that others have given. On your own you don't talk (or not that often I hope) which means you see more wildlife - in Shetland we have lots of otters and you definitely see many more of them on your own. Having said that, I like meeting people along the trail and exchanging notes and tales. On my first West Highland Way walk many, many years ago when I was quite young I walked in parallel with a lovely old chap who was a retired firefighter from Alnwick. We sometimes walked together for a mile or two and had a pint or two in the evening. The kind of really pleasing social encounter that happily modifies my desire for solitude.

Islandplodder

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Re: Walking Solo
« Reply #18 on: 10:02:27, 27/05/19 »

I am becoming converted to solo walking as the years go on.  I have I friend I walk with regularly, but she is younger, slimmer and fitter than I am and we are a bit out of sync at the moment in terms of speed and how much we want to rough it.  So I started going out on my own more, and find I really enjoy it, for all the reasons other people have given.  You meet more people travelling solo, if you are feeling sociable, but you don't have to if you aren't.
The only thing is, I live in a remote area with very poor phone signal, and there are some places I am becoming wary of going alone, as I know it would be a while before I got help if I turned an ankle or worse.  I do try to give an accurate route plan to Mr I.

alan de enfield

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Re: Walking Solo
« Reply #19 on: 10:09:49, 27/05/19 »

The only thing is, I live in a remote area with very poor phone signal, and there are some places I am becoming wary of going alone, as I know it would be a while before I got help if I turned an ankle or worse.  I do try to give an accurate route plan to Mr I.



Have you considered a PLB (Personal Locator Beacon) No phone signal needed.
Works on GPS and sends a signal, via satellite, to the Search & rescue (works worldwide) - Land or Sea.


https://www.marinesuperstore.com/safety-beacons/plb-ais/mcmurdo-fastfind-220-gps-plb?utm_source=google_shopping&utm_medium=pcn&utm_term=99336769&utm_campaign=MSS&gclid=Cj0KCQjwla7nBRDxARIsADll0kDorRlsnLVa_5FA145zX17TYt4tqPMnpbqccTpqpjP659s07lY4dwEaAkhLEALw_wcB





gunwharfman

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Re: Walking Solo
« Reply #20 on: 10:33:53, 27/05/19 »
I walk alone and am happy to do so. I've tried walking with others on a single or two days and I can cope with that, good fun as well but for longer walks, it becomes difficult. Two areas of problem, I will either walk faster than a companion, or walk slower than them and knowing that I camp (I wake, get up early and just want to go!) and the companion is still in a B & B, they are not going to show their face for maybe up to two hours later than me, if nothing else they are going to want the breakfast that they have paid for. Kicking my heels waiting until they surface is not a pleasant thought, if I started walking as normal I could be two or three miles ahead of them. For me, the answer would be that we would need to agree that we walk independently to a given destination, then meet up socially, compare notes and so on at the end of the day.

Patrick1

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Re: Walking Solo
« Reply #21 on: 10:42:48, 27/05/19 »
I walked solo for many years, then when I met my other half and we got married I enjoyed the company of walking together. As children arrived it seemed natural to add them too, and walking as a family group still tends to be my preferred option even now the kids are in their mid to late teens.


However, I've always seemed to take on the role of "walk planner", and as the kids have got older I seem to feel more and more pressure to make sure each walk is better than the last - a more spectacular view, higher peak, better camping spot, within everyone's capabilities, etc. I think this comes from me more than anyone else, but it does make the walking less and less relaxing as I try to make sure its a great experience for everyone involved. Recently I've happened to do a couple of walks solo again, one day walk and one over three days, and was reminded just how relaxing it is walking when you've only yourself to please.


Bottom line is probably that there are different attractions to walking in different combinations, but it did make me think I mustn't forget the pleasures of walking solo (or with just my wife, which I find equally relaxing) rather than in the role of "group leader"!
« Last Edit: 12:20:11, 27/05/19 by Patrick1 »

Warbler

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Re: Walking Solo
« Reply #22 on: 13:45:22, 27/05/19 »
I walk solo probably 90% of my outings, for all the reasons outlined above. One exception being an annual get together with a small group of friends, which is actually more of a social catch-up with a couple of walks thrown in.

Slogger

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Re: Walking Solo
« Reply #23 on: 15:03:29, 27/05/19 »
I enjoy the freedom of solo walking, no one to make you walk too fast or too slow, make you stop when you'de rather carry on, make you carry on when you'de rather stop, no one to want to change the route or moan about anything, every decision made by yourself with no one to interfere.I do also walk with others, but my pals (as I also used to) bring their competativeness to every walk, being fell, road, trail and ultra runners, myself being 'ex' in all those disciplines. At 73 years I simply cannot keep pace with them any longer and get fed up of them waiting for me, not that I am slow, just that I have lost much of my speed, although the endurance is still there.

rhiiwn

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Re: Walking Solo
« Reply #24 on: 15:37:25, 27/05/19 »
I love walking on my own - it’s one of the only chances I get for everything to truly be quiet around me!! Haha.  ;D 


Life is so hectic that it’s so nice to wake up early one morning, pack my day bag and head out on my own to see some beautiful sights, walk around and take photos/find a spot to sit and admire views (and get some exercise!) for a few hours  :)


I do like getting out in groups from time to time, but with the opportunities that I get for walking out in the Peaks being pretty limited anyway, I like to be a little selfish and head out solo. 😂

GinAndPlatonic

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Re: Walking Solo
« Reply #25 on: 18:35:49, 27/05/19 »
I have walked with a friend for 30 years and often offloaded my worries to him and also listened  to his trials and tribulations on the way round our walks, which took me out of my own personal space. The last few years however it got to the stage where his offloading about his life detracted from my enjoyment of our walks & I used to take walks on my own. I found that I was enjoying these walks far more and taking in feelings and thoughts  that only a lone traveler can experience...they were always positive and left me in a good mood at the end of the day.

Bigfoot_Mike

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Re: Walking Solo
« Reply #26 on: 18:59:59, 27/05/19 »
I always go solo, i,m so used to it now i dont think i can or even want to change.I think walking solo probably makes you concentrate more on any difficult sections you encounter(no-one to help/save you).
One side effect is advanced "Doolittle,s Syndrome",constantly talking to the animals,the sheep look at me as if i,m nuts  :D
I do the same. I also moo at cows, baa at sheep, bray at donkeys, etc. when I am alone in the car. As I live in a rural area and commute alone into the city for work, my car is often filled with animal noises.  :D

BuzyG

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Re: Walking Solo
« Reply #27 on: 20:51:22, 27/05/19 »
Another who is happy to walk all day alone.  Though I also enjoy the company of others on a walk.

A comment on the Ramblers.  The group I often walk with, do indeed count the sheep appoint a back marker etc.  But we all know the regular members of the group can look after them selves too. Our walk on Sunday, for example. We started in foul conditions 15 plus two dogs.  By the top of Yes tor, one couple and their dog asked me to let the walk leader know they were heading back.  By High Willhays another two members and the other dog had seen enough thick fog for one day and also headed back. We carried on accross the valley to kitty tor and off down Amocombe hill towards the saddle accross to great Kneeset.  At this point I choose to leave the group and add in an extra 3 mile loop up to Fur tor and Cut hill.   So I simply informed the walk leader of my intentions, mentioned  I might catch them up on the ridge from Hanging Stone hill to Cosdon beacon and turned North into the fog.  Never did catch sight of them again, but no suprise given they don't hang about and visibility was never more than a few hundred yards all day and about 20 yards on the tops. 

Simple honest uncomplecated communication. ;)   Walking with a group need not be a regimented bimble.
« Last Edit: 21:04:35, 27/05/19 by BuzyG »

jontea

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Re: Walking Solo
« Reply #28 on: 22:05:00, 27/05/19 »
Posting today as a cyclist and not a walker (temporarily) my daughter and I approached a group of about 30 walkers walking in the same direction as us, so tight together they were almost falling over each other. Walking along a narrow but beautiful aqueduct on the Peak Forest canal, which has stunning views out over the River Goyt and farmland below.


As we approached some distance away, I began ringing my bell, its amazing how many walkers fail to respond to this, but shouting to my daughter about anything, just to be heard usually works as plan B, but not in this case.


Finally having come to a complete stand still behind the rather senior group, the guy at the back of the group turns around and see us. He then shouts ”everyone to the left” but only half the group hear this, as most are so absorbed in their own conversations that not only do they not realise we are waiting to pass, but not aware of their surroundings.
As we slowly moved passed the group, we got stuck behind one particular couple chatting away, totally oblivious to the fact most of the group had moved over, leaving the two of us behind them.
They did eventually notice us having almost suffered a heart attack.
We said our thanks to them and cycled on.


But this is how I see big rambling groups, my impression of them is likened to sheep herding. which isn't for me. Small groups or solo.

Walking is the world’s oldest exercise and today’s modern medicine.

http://johntrowsdale.blogspot.com/?m=1
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BuzyG

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Re: Walking Solo
« Reply #29 on: 22:26:12, 27/05/19 »
Jontea, your comments so reminded me of what regularlly happens to me when I'm out enjoying the country lanes in my sports car and get stuck behind cyclists.   ;D

Also as written above.  Find the right ramblers group and they are just fine.  O0