Author Topic: Cutting daily camping costs?  (Read 3251 times)

Slogger

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Re: Cutting daily camping costs?
« Reply #45 on: 16:56:25, 11/06/19 »
The only timew my camping trips gets costly is when I have to abandon the tent and get b&b. As I don't usually stop for long overnight and camp wild, I don't drink that much if at all, until I'm finished.Probably costs me a tenth of what it costs those that use a baggage serviceand stay in b&b's the whole way.

strawy

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Re: Cutting daily camping costs?
« Reply #46 on: 21:27:03, 11/06/19 »

Nothing is free,so do we subtract normal living costs?
Camp in your garden,youve still paid for it,buy the "best" gear,use it a dozen times then say youve had a free break...nah..
Cost is irrelevant,enjoyment is surely all that matters.
Wildcampers pay no fees but pay more for the lighter weight kit they carry.
Me..I,m a tight git,i throw a few tins & pot noodles in the car & off i go,£5-10 a night,dont need pub grub,dont need wi-fi,i go to get away for a day or two.
And the cost to me is still irrelevant,the enjoyment however, is priceless  ;)

Bigfoot_Mike

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Re: Cutting daily camping costs?
« Reply #47 on: 22:37:55, 11/06/19 »
Price isnít a guarantee of enjoyment in many areas. However, I have found that going cheap can sometimes be the more expensive option. Whisky, coffee, ice cream, sausages, bacon are but a few things where buying the cheapest is often a waste of money. Buying cheap with some items of hiking gear can also work out to be costly, although I wonít pay a lot more just because something is a few grams lighter.


I am with GWM in that I place enjoyment over price. A hiking trip may be more expensive with pub meals and a few pints, but if that is what you enjoy and you can afford it, go for it.

sussamb

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Re: Cutting daily camping costs?
« Reply #48 on: 07:46:37, 12/06/19 »
All relative I suppose and what's enjoyable for some isn't for others. I tend not to camp anymore, preferring b&b's at my age, done enough 'camping' over the years though, mainly with the Army, but wouldn't dream of using a baggage service on my LDWs.  As I get older and less capable though if paying someone to carry my pack meant I could continue with LDWs then I'd feel it would be worth it  O0
Where there's a will ...

mananddog

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Re: Cutting daily camping costs?
« Reply #49 on: 09:04:45, 13/06/19 »

I do use campsites and wild camp where there is little option. I enjoy eating in pubs when on a big multi week walk - it is a welcome change from dehydrated food which, no matter how good, is no substitute for fresh food. I try and BnB once a week on a big trip but this is harder with a dog these days. I also think I have a duty to contribute to the local economy of the places I enjoy, if I did not they might not be as they are.


I know a lot of people get enjoyment out of driving to a place after having bought their fuel in the cheap local supermarket, taking all their supplies, wild camping and then driving home having had a good time and spent very little (although taking in the cost of running a car and it is not so cheap) and contributing nothing to the local economy (except their car's pollution) - as if they are bucking the system.


I get a sense of purpose from getting to my start point on public transport, mixing with locals in shops and pubs en route where they exist and experiencing not only the countryside but also the local culture and returning on local transport.


Even when I go on holiday in a cottage with the missus we always try to find good local suppliers of food.


I remember talking to a bloke from Llanberis (a miserable git but he had a point) who called all those who come to walk up Snowdon parasites, he said they come in their hundreds of thousands each year in their busses and cars, go up the mountain and most go home contributing nothing to the local economy. I am not saying I agree but he has a point. 


Pubs, public transport, hotels, shops, use it or lose it.
« Last Edit: 09:08:52, 13/06/19 by mananddog »

gunwharfman

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Re: Cutting daily camping costs?
« Reply #50 on: 09:42:29, 13/06/19 »
I suppose that when hiking I do contribute to the local economy a little bit. I use campsites, pubs and coffee shops and every few days I buy a few choccy bars and nuts, however, I never buy anything else unless it's forced on me, (e.g. when a tent pole snapped and I had to buy a couple of small items to repair it) extra items just adds to my carry weight. The reality is we all live in a capitalist economy and the Llanberis man can moan as much as he wants but he cannot change anything in particular unless he and the people that he supports actually do something about it as capitalists and 'inform' the 'parasites' of the error of their ways.

ninthace

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Re: Cutting daily camping costs?
« Reply #51 on: 10:43:00, 13/06/19 »
Is your urge to contribute to the local economy evidence that you are a closet capitalist supporting local businesses or is this a marxist urge to redistribute the wealth?
Solvitur Ambulando

Jac

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Re: Cutting daily camping costs?
« Reply #52 on: 10:44:38, 13/06/19 »
Is your urge to contribute to the local economy evidence that you are a closet capitalist supporting local businesses or is this a marxist urge to redistribute the wealth?

Damned if you do and damned if you don't ?
So many paths, so little time

gunwharfman

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Re: Cutting daily camping costs?
« Reply #53 on: 14:59:02, 13/06/19 »
I know I'm a capitalist, that I can't deny, but I'm also a great fan of the historian Karl Marx at the same time.

mananddog

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Re: Cutting daily camping costs?
« Reply #54 on: 08:45:47, 14/06/19 »
Is your urge to contribute to the local economy evidence that you are a closet capitalist supporting local businesses or is this a marxist urge to redistribute the wealth?



It is a nostalgic and selfish desire to see pubs, shops and local facilities survive in our countryside.  :)

gunwharfman

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Re: Cutting daily camping costs?
« Reply #55 on: 10:05:28, 14/06/19 »
A bit off topic but to me a classic Marx example of capitalism in action. How to create new 'industries' and to make money. Easy make tattooists pass an exam to practise their trade. To get qualified or you can't practice, benefits all round, the tattooists, the qualification designers, the property for the whole educational and training exercise, equipment, desks, PCs, chairs, advertising, printing, catering, the list just goes on and on, brilliant!

https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2019/jun/14/call-for-tattooists-and-body-piercers-to-qualify-in-infection-control

barewirewalker

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Re: Cutting daily camping costs?
« Reply #56 on: 10:09:36, 14/06/19 »

It is a nostalgic and selfish desire to see pubs, shops and local facilities survive in our countryside.  :)


Is it selfish? These local facilities are usually the cornerstones of the local community, and we as users of the alternative access network are an important part of that economy. Our contribution may well be, as yet unmeasured, so not fully understood.




It may seem selfish from the standpoint of the property owner, who wants to develop a prime site for a lucrative housing project. But these often rip out the heart of a rural community. A reality that was  told to me by a farmer I was talking to in a field above Llangunllo, some years ago, the local pub, the Greyhound, had closed on the death of a very old landlord/owner. A prime site for development but the council held out against a change of use application so that community buy out reopened the pub 5 years later.




It is these historic venues that put character into our countryside. Link the local community to the visitor and provide a part of the conduit for the transference of wealth, that is less than fully understood.




Marion Shoard points out in her books that it is the hospitality trade by being a major employer draws more countryside income than traditional rural pursuits. Camping comes under the heading of hospitality.
Since few landowners now own the pubs that were the hinge point of the the old rural community and the venue they used to collect rents from their tenants, they cannot relate to the income that come to the rural economy by visitors such as us.
BWW
Their Land is in Our Country.

ninthace

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Re: Cutting daily camping costs?
« Reply #57 on: 10:49:34, 14/06/19 »

It is a nostalgic and selfish desire to see pubs, shops and local facilities survive in our countryside.  :)
Call me selfish then. My village is down to a pub (which is for sale) and 2 shops. When the shops go, it will be a 24 mile round trip on Devon lanes to the nearest one.  If the pub goes, it will a drive to any other watering hole.
Solvitur Ambulando

mananddog

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Re: Cutting daily camping costs?
« Reply #58 on: 11:48:26, 14/06/19 »
You all seen to have misunderstood. I was referring to myself in an ironic way I like living in my idealised past. Keep your wigs on  O0


I live in the country and that is why I value and support these things hence the selfishness and why I like to support such facilities in other places. I know how important they are.

barewirewalker

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Re: Cutting daily camping costs?
« Reply #59 on: 17:47:10, 14/06/19 »
I was referring to myself in an ironic way I like living in my idealised past. Keep your wigs on  O0

I thought, having read many of your post over the years M&D that a touch of irony was the pepper and salt on your post. I have to thank you for this remark, it short circuited some memories and brought a realization to me that backs up some suspicions I have had. Ever since first reading the landowner policies and arguments about our footpaths, I have realised that they are badly and dangerously flawed. The part the local hostelry played in the history our countryside and pedestrian travel and how landowners lived off rents has been largely forgotten, since the rise and fall of the brewing industries 8 major breweries and the tied pub. Many country pubs were also small farms, but large land owners were only too keen to capitalize on them post war. They now forget that they were the focal point of cross country routes
BWW
Their Land is in Our Country.