Author Topic: To boot or not to boot?  (Read 809 times)

ed85

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To boot or not to boot?
« on: 08:35:48, 03/06/19 »
Hi all - new poster here so apologies if this has been covered elsewhere, but looking for general advice on footwear.


I'm doing the Yorkshire Three Peaks in August, so that's 24m miles in 12 hours, and I'm weighing up the best footwear for it...


I've got some walking boots that are a couple of years old that I've worn to festivals and the odd walk/hike, but they're a little big for me and feel really heavy and clompy when worn all day, so I'm worried that 12 hours in them is going to be uncomfortable and add extra weight I don't need.


I've also got some Asics trail running shoes that I wore around New Zealand recently and that I wear when running at the gym.


From reading some articles on hiking sites some people claim that the whole ' you must have ankle support' argument can be a bit overblown and that generally, you can wear a decent pair of trail running shoes for hiking to save weight, provided you haven't had past trouble with ankle injuries and that you're fit fit and healthy (which I am).


The kit advice on the Three Peaks site has a big warning saying that you should wear boots, but I feel this is mainly to stop people turning up in Converse or flip flops, which is understandable.


My boots really don't feel comfortable, and if I buy a new pair now now I'm not sure if I'll be able to break them in by August. Are the trail runners a good idea?


Any advice appreciated!


Thanks







Owen

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Re: To boot or not to boot?
« Reply #1 on: 08:42:54, 03/06/19 »
If they're comfortable yes they'll be fine. As long as they have good tread.

Percy

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Re: To boot or not to boot?
« Reply #2 on: 09:52:58, 03/06/19 »
Agreed that they will be fine if youíre used to them.


I have stopped wearing boots for hill walking outside of the coldest and wettest parts of the year.


Like you I wear trail running shoes -Iíve used both Altra and Nike with no problems.

gunwharfman

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Re: To boot or not to boot?
« Reply #3 on: 10:05:33, 03/06/19 »
I'm sure they will be fine. Some people only walk in off-road running shoes as well.

I tried walking shoes, they were great as well, except I could never really comes to terms with not having my ankles covered. The boots I buy today are midi-boots, for me the best of all.

Jac

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Re: To boot or not to boot?
« Reply #4 on: 10:12:51, 03/06/19 »
Agreed that they will be fine if youíre used to them.
I have stopped wearing boots for hill walking outside of the coldest and wettest parts of the year.
Like you I wear trail running shoes -Iíve used both Altra and Nike with no problems.

Me too
So many paths, so little time

ed85

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Re: To boot or not to boot?
« Reply #5 on: 11:13:15, 03/06/19 »
Thanks for all your replies, really reassuring to know that those trail runners are a viable option!

Ralph

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Re: To boot or not to boot?
« Reply #6 on: 20:27:33, 03/06/19 »
I have mostly worn boots for 35 years or so, but the last 5 years or more I have preferred shoes. My feet for the last few years are not comfortable with  gore or similar membranes, overheating after around 6 miles no matter what the temperature is. I now walk all year in non membrane shoes with  Sealskin socks as a backup if needed no problems so for.

alan de enfield

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Re: To boot or not to boot?
« Reply #7 on: 20:57:06, 03/06/19 »

The kit advice on the Three Peaks site has a big warning saying that you should wear boots, but I feel this is mainly to stop people turning up in Converse or flip flops, which is understandable.




My concern would be that I turn up, ready to go, and the organisers say "no boots - no go"


It may be worth a call to see how important adherence to the 'kit list' is.

taxino8

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Re: To boot or not to boot?
« Reply #8 on: 21:07:40, 03/06/19 »

My concern would be that I turn up, ready to go, and the organisers say "no boots - no go"


It may be worth a call to see how important adherence to the 'kit list' is.

I did  the Yorkshire Three Peaks in 2015 and nobody even gave us a second glance regarding the kit we were carrying.
I did wear boots and was glad I did as it chucked it down coming off Whernside and going up Ingleborough, so the good grip on my Asolo boots was welcome. Having said that I went for a walk up Whernside last summer and it was bone dry so I wore my trail shoes without any problem.

Dread

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Re: To boot or not to boot?
« Reply #9 on: 21:25:35, 03/06/19 »
If you're going as part of an organised event then they may well insist on adherence to their kit list. D of E do this but then they are dealing with children. It's a good idea  to check. Just tell them you have trail runners and it shouldn't be a problem. Folk do all sorts of hikes in trail shoes these days.

WILDWALKINGUK

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Re: To boot or not to boot?
« Reply #10 on: 05:58:23, 04/06/19 »
I have been using leather boots for 40 odd years, often suffering with blisters. 2 years ago I tried Inov8 Roclite 325 for walking the TGO Challenge and have never looked back. No blisters, No wearing them in and so much lighter on my feet that I walk further in a day. This year I purchased a pair of Inov8 Roclite 345 GTX Graphene soled boots to walk from Lands End to John O'Groats. They lastd the whole 1200 miles. Both have a bit of ankle support. I've just received some Inov8 Roclite 275 shoes that I am going to be using for summer walking. Love em... a full review of the 345s on my site wildwalkinguk.com. I will review the 275 soon.
Good luck with your challenge...

BuzyG

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Re: To boot or not to boot?
« Reply #11 on: 20:37:47, 04/06/19 »
For walking on hard dry ground I prefer my cheap Karrimore walking shoes to boots. Very comfy.  Once the wetter weather returns it is back to my walking boots. Soaking wet feet are not my idea of fun. Always good to have options for different situations.