Author Topic: Walking in this heat  (Read 1259 times)

Bigfoot_Mike

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Re: Walking in this heat
« Reply #15 on: 05:30:37, 25/07/19 »
This heat makes me glad I live in north east Scotland now, rather than the south coast of England where I hail from. It has only been mid 20s here and that has seemed much too hot to me.

happyhiker

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Re: Walking in this heat
« Reply #16 on: 08:58:46, 25/07/19 »
Funny old thing - in Kuwait we worked from 0600 to past 2400hr  for up to 4 weeks at a stretch and somehow it was not as unpleasant as it can be here.  The temperature on the way to work, at dawn, was usually already over 26C, I think it must be a humidity thing as the air was a dry as a bone.
My last trip to Austria was a case in point - on top of the mountain with a light breeze 26C was tolerable but in the valley, without a breath of air, life was quite unpleasant.
Good luck to those in the SE tomorrow, the forecast looks unpleasant.  We are off to Dartmoor where the forecast is better: 21C (18 with wind chill) 60% humidity.


Definitely is the humidity which does it. I have been lucky enough to visit Egypt and the Atacama Desert. In both places the sun was fierce and you had to take sensible cover up precautions but because the air was as dry as the proverbial bone, the heat was not a problem.


Sudden thought, where does "dry as a bone" come from?

Rob Goes Walking

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Re: Walking in this heat
« Reply #17 on: 09:08:29, 25/07/19 »
Sudden thought, where does "dry as a bone" come from?

I had a look on Google but wasn't much help. All I could find out for sure was the first known usage of bone-dry is in the 15th century. An opinion was that it's related to what happens when you leave a bone in the sun, but it was just somebodies opinion.

fernman

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Re: Walking in this heat
« Reply #18 on: 13:49:04, 25/07/19 »
Ha! The Beeb weather forecast has just made me chuckle.  After hearing about record breaking temperatures for tomorrow we were reassured that there would be a breeze.... "the kind of breeze you get when you open a fan oven door" was what he said.
Made me laugh out loud that did  ;D

I experienced that once in a heatwave in Greece. Temperature was 42C and when there was a little breeze it felt just like an oven door being opened. All you could do was sit in the edge of the sea under a parasol. Wish I could do that right now! At home it is 36C at this moment, that's 96.8F in old money. I've got nothing on, a pint of cold squash is in front of me, all the windows are open and I've drawn all the curtains. Any activity is completely out of the question. Thank goodness it's forecast to go back to normal next week, then I can go for my next day walk.

fit old bird

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Re: Walking in this heat
« Reply #19 on: 13:56:11, 25/07/19 »

I did a 3 mile walk last night at 9pm. I did it again this morning between 9 and 10. Too hot for me. I'm staying indoors. 


ilona

tonyk

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Re: Walking in this heat
« Reply #20 on: 13:57:53, 25/07/19 »
! At home it is 36C at this moment, that's 96.8F in old money. I've got nothing on, a pint of cold squash is in front of me, all the windows are open and I've drawn all the curtains.
Its about 34 C here at the moment.I have got the curtains and windows closed.Apparently it keeps the hot air out and so far it seems to be working.

ninthace

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Re: Walking in this heat
« Reply #21 on: 15:01:00, 25/07/19 »
Well we ventured out onto Dartmoor today.  We parked high on the moor at 0900 and set of into the breeze towards Cranmere Pool.  The forecast last night was a max of 21C which, with windchill, should have felt like 18C.  Ha!  The breeze felt like somebody had left the oven door open and when we got back, the car thermometer showed 28 even after we got moving.  Fortunately, I took 3 litres of water with us and we certainly needed it though with the wind it was hot rather than sweaty.
The outside temperature sensor on the shady N side of my house that controls our heating is at 27 in the shade and my solar hot water system has tripped off as it has got too hot.  The roof collector is currently at 145C and rising.  Mind you - the post walk shower was piping hot!
I'm glad we are cooler in the SW - heaven help the SE!
Solvitur Ambulando

roughyed

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Re: Walking in this heat
« Reply #22 on: 15:23:19, 25/07/19 »
I did about 7 miles and finished probably a mile or 2 'early'.  Just too hot (obviously!).


I set off at 9:30 and was back at the car around 1, I had wanted to be out at least an hour earlier.  Planned the walk to be mainly in woodland so shady, that bit worked, just overheated a bit still.  Had loads of water on me (3 litres +), and some of it went over the head to help with evaporation.  Was tough.


Car was saying 36+ when I got back, and it was in the shade. 

Pitboot

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Re: Walking in this heat
« Reply #23 on: 18:37:53, 25/07/19 »
Having been the victim of heat exhaustion, a long time ago in a foreign country, I would not risk it again. But mrs P and I love to walk, so we find a nice lake and bimble along around it at a steady pace, not pushing ourselves, drinking and resting where we want. We have found some beautiful picnic spots like this so hot weather has its uses.


To digress slightly, I see that some rail companies are worried about rails buckling in the heat. Surely the engineers who build the systems know that metal expands when heated? (Maybe one for the small rant thread here.)
If I should fall to rise no more,
As many comrades did before,
Then ask the fifes and drums to play.
Over the hills and far away.

pauldawes

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Re: Walking in this heat
« Reply #24 on: 19:00:23, 25/07/19 »
First Thursday I haven’t gone out for a longish walk for months...it wouldn’t have been remotely enjoyable.

BuzyG

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Re: Walking in this heat
« Reply #25 on: 19:09:01, 25/07/19 »
Headed to the indoor climbing wall this evening, like I do most Thursdays after work.  More staff than climbers.  Me I lasted about 45 mins before I could take no more of slipping off the sweaty holds. May nip out for a few quick local miles after the cycling.

Owen

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Re: Walking in this heat
« Reply #26 on: 19:09:50, 25/07/19 »



To digress slightly, I see that some rail companies are worried about rails buckling in the heat. Surely the engineers who build the systems know that metal expands when heated? (Maybe one for the small rant thread here.)




Victorian engineers used to leave a half inch gap between rails, the fish plates had slots in them where the bolts went through. Now they use continuous welded rails, so nowhere for the gap. That's progress for you.

ninthace

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Re: Walking in this heat
« Reply #27 on: 19:10:21, 25/07/19 »
To digress slightly, I see that some rail companies are worried about rails buckling in the heat. Surely the engineers who build the systems know that metal expands when heated? (Maybe one for the small rant thread here.)
They do - the bean counters decide how much the engineers can spend stopping it happening.
Solvitur Ambulando

BuzyG

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Re: Walking in this heat
« Reply #28 on: 19:17:13, 25/07/19 »
They do - the bean counters decide how much the engineers can spend stopping it happening.
Ah, the bean counter Vs the engineer.  That could be a lengthy thread.

Dovegirl

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Re: Walking in this heat
« Reply #29 on: 19:44:08, 25/07/19 »
I walked along Brighton seafront and on top of the cliffs this afternoon, and for some while it was very overcast with even a few spots of rain.  It was only as I was coming back that it became sunny.  Crowds on the front.