Author Topic: A footpath blocked by a new home  (Read 804 times)

citadel1

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A footpath blocked by a new home
« on: 20:21:15, 28/07/19 »
Went for a walk this afternoon along the severn river, the severn way,  at one point came across a new build , the path has been diverted to the main road , only to have it re join the river path after the property.. My friend checked the OS map on his mobile to show clearly the path should have carried on .  Can you, in effect "buy" a right of way for a clearly well used path ?   

archaeoroutes

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Re: A footpath blocked by a new home
« Reply #1 on: 20:28:20, 28/07/19 »
Round us there are quite a few 'new' houses with the ROW going through them. By 'new' I mean in the last 50 years.
Walking routes visiting ancient sites in Britain's uplands: http://www.archaeoroutes.co.uk

gunwharfman

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Re: A footpath blocked by a new home
« Reply #2 on: 20:30:57, 28/07/19 »
The same thing on the footpath between Horsham and East Grinstead, housing estate right on top!

ninthace

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Re: A footpath blocked by a new home
« Reply #3 on: 20:34:38, 28/07/19 »
Went for a walk this afternoon along the severn river, the severn way,  at one point came across a new build , the path has been diverted to the main road , only to have it re join the river path after the property.. My friend checked the OS map on his mobile to show clearly the path should have carried on .  Can you, in effect "buy" a right of way for a clearly well used path ?
No. but you can divert it with the appropriate planning permissions.  The OS map takes aeons to catch up and then only if they are told and the definitive map is amended.  I have seen a development built across a PROW.  The path went through the garden of one house and the lounge of the neighbour.  The developer was made to build a path between the two houses and then build a stile into the field the path went through - he wasn't happy.
Solvitur Ambulando

citadel1

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Re: A footpath blocked by a new home
« Reply #4 on: 21:51:47, 28/07/19 »
Thanks for the replies, i will email the local authority about this, i mean live & let live etc but, this seems to be a bit of a cheek, the only section of the river path i have walked on where your diverted on to a busy main road. for a single, pretty much brand new house
« Last Edit: 21:55:29, 28/07/19 by citadel1 »

ninthace

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Re: A footpath blocked by a new home
« Reply #5 on: 21:58:53, 28/07/19 »
In Weardale there is a PROW that goes up the drive of a house, past their back door and out across their back lawn.  I bet they loved that when the solicitor told them.  In Mallerstang there is a path that goes straight across a front garden - I spoke to the householder who was fine with it.
Solvitur Ambulando

pleb

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Re: A footpath blocked by a new home
« Reply #6 on: 21:59:38, 28/07/19 »
Wait till barewirewalker sees this, he will be livid! You are right, its a bit off. In fact assuming house is newer than right of way, shouldnt really happen.
We're all doomed! DOOOMED I SAY!

ninthace

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Re: A footpath blocked by a new home
« Reply #7 on: 22:08:41, 28/07/19 »
Wait till barewirewalker sees this, he will be livid! You are right, its a bit off. In fact assuming house is newer than right of way, shouldnt really happen.
Not necessarily - depends what was agreed when planning permission was granted. 
Solvitur Ambulando

BuzyG

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Re: A footpath blocked by a new home
« Reply #8 on: 22:08:48, 28/07/19 »
Yes, we have a number of marked public footpaths running through our housing estate.  When we moved to Saltash 25 years go, It was all farm land and the house we live in now, was one of the very first in the estate.  Happily we still have feilds at the back of us.  Planning permission has already been  approved for a further 3000 houses, just the other side of the A 38.  When that estate goes up it will be over another existing rural footpath.
« Last Edit: 22:14:58, 28/07/19 by BuzyG »

ninthace

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Re: A footpath blocked by a new home
« Reply #9 on: 22:16:49, 28/07/19 »
We had a development in Brough over a rural footpath.  It was rerouted as part of the planning process.


Equally, if you walk the Pennine Way through Cronkley Farm (NY 86259 28938) the OS map shows the path going through the farm.  When you get there you will find the path has been legally rerouted around the west side of the farm.  When I passed that way, the paperwork was on display and the diversion signed.  The maps are not always right and PROWs can be legally altered.
Solvitur Ambulando

archaeoroutes

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Re: A footpath blocked by a new home
« Reply #10 on: 09:26:30, 29/07/19 »
There's a reasonably old house near us that has a ROW through its garden. In this case the house predates the ROW - a canal was made through their garden and then when it was filled in the towpath ROW remained. It spilts their back garden in half but I've never had any issues walking it.

Where I grew up and estate was built across a ROW. My friend had a house which stradled it. Every year a gentleman from the Ramblers would hop through everyone's gardens 'to keep the ROW in use'. When he came to my friend's he'd knock on the front door and walk through the house and out the back .
Walking routes visiting ancient sites in Britain's uplands: http://www.archaeoroutes.co.uk

barewirewalker

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Re: A footpath blocked by a new home
« Reply #11 on: 10:02:29, 29/07/19 »
Most footpath diversions and blockages tell a story, it is possible to deduce quite a bit about them from the map. Trouble is a story like this is fairly meaningless without more detail. There are members here, who are very knowledgeable and have given comment on both the legal side and more.

Location is always the first clue, but where is it? Beside the River Severn, its 240 miles long!


Streetmap.com is a very good and quick way to share a location.

1. Pick a postcode roughly in the area and type it in.
2. The area will open up in the largest A-Z scale map.
3. Click on the bars to zoom out, Explorer or Landranger scale comes up.
4. Find the location you wish to share.
5. Move the Arrow that will be pointing to the Postcode used.
6. Copy the internet address and paste it into a post using the hyperlink button.

Then we know where, which county, how it can affect the wider access network etc.

By the way Welcome to the forum, it is always interesting to know about these problems.

BWW
Their Land is in Our Country.

Dyffryn Ardudwy

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Re: A footpath blocked by a new home
« Reply #12 on: 13:18:14, 01/08/19 »
For those of you who can remember the Esther Rantzen series "That's Life" many years ago.
I vividly remember a discussion on a topic about very strange rights of way, and residents inability to have the route changed.

I forget where it was in England, but this right of way went through this couples garden, past their patio lounge window, and out through a swing gate some yards away, through their laurel bushes.

They tried everything to have the right of way diverted, but because of the very nature of the pathway, the council simply refused to listen to their views.

The right of way was of long standing, and its was either the way they went about it, or simply because of the pressure of the local rights of way group, nothing was done.

Members of the public were mostly puzzled and confused when they saw they were interrupting this couples tea or evening telly, but the stalwarts and regulars, simply walked across this couples lawn in heavy boots.

Innominate Man

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Re: A footpath blocked by a new home
« Reply #13 on: 13:28:23, 01/08/19 »
As with many Planning issues these days, there does seem to be a presumption in favour of developers rather than maintaining the green-belt/countryside.
The point of planning, which I always naively assumed to be one of protection, has swung around to ensure almost any development goes ahead un-hindered: It seems meeting building new home quotas/targets has priority over common sense/common law/common people.
Hang on, I've just had a topic drift and I'm now in the Small Rant thread !   ;D
Only a hill but all of life to me, up there between the sunset and the sea. 
Geoffrey Winthrop Young

barewirewalker

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Re: A footpath blocked by a new home
« Reply #14 on: 17:53:15, 01/08/19 »
I wonder how many examples of a house being built across a right of way and the owners having to let ramblers walk from one door to the other, there really are.

Nearly every time the issue of rights of way are aired by landowners this example is trotted out, but how often does the mile of lost way that could link up ten miles of underused RoW and make it into a very useful way, get any mention at all. (I would hazard a guess that I have given more examples of the later on this forum in the last 10 years than the 50 years that particular excuse to demonize RoWs have shown)

Reading the Daily Mail on my bro in laws kitchen table this morning, I note that Prince Charles has come up with a ten point plan to save Britain's rural economy. There is one glaring omission, land owners opening up the countryside to help put hospitality dependent visitors into a village based hospitality suites, in other words a rights of way network that has overall continuity of way and avoids the road network.
But I suppose HRH Charles is a landowner.


It is after all the historic reason many of our villages started in the first place.


« Last Edit: 17:59:54, 01/08/19 by barewirewalker »
BWW
Their Land is in Our Country.