Author Topic: A footpath blocked by a new home  (Read 800 times)

jimbob

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Re: A footpath blocked by a new home
« Reply #15 on: 19:03:16, 01/08/19 »

But I suppose HRH Charles is a landowner.

Only suppose? All of your "landowner" arguments are about his mother, since she owns all land in the UK and many other countries of which she is monarch. All non Royal Estate land is held in freehold granted from the crown. Freeholders can then lease all or portions of that land to other loyal subjects.

So, the landowner on request of the Scottish Parliament signed into law open access to all her land in Scotland with the provisos that that Parliament requested.
If the UK Parliament proposed a similar open access law in the rest of the UK then the landowner has already shown her willingness to so do. How much easier to campaign for that than to be chasing up he veracity of challenged historical documents and opening countless individual cases with county councils and the like.

Too little, too late, too bad......

barewirewalker

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Re: A footpath blocked by a new home
« Reply #16 on: 20:29:30, 01/08/19 »
Your response on a higher level of intellectual plane than my 'off the cuff quip',

Sadly all too true, both the Lost way Project, post CRoW act and the Stepping Foreward Iniative would have benefited from some of the logic wrapped up in your post.

My 'Quip' was more triggered by the picture of the CLA's Land and Business monthly being on HRH's coffee table reading, was the status symbol more influential than the historical and economic facts that should have put the Access Network into the equation.

There is no doubt that HRH has put some deep thought into his ten points, but the issue of access and it's potential benefits for the rural economy have not received the level of study that should have put it in his sightline.
BWW
Their Land is in Our Country.

jimbob

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Re: A footpath blocked by a new home
« Reply #17 on: 21:08:28, 01/08/19 »
Actually I totally agree with you on the many lost opportunities for rural revival based on open access.  Having walked the Camino Frances and seen the little bars, cafes, hostels and bnbs supported by he people walking and visiting that area then comparing that to say the Pennine Way and the lack of any facilities on  many  days when more than a few are walking.Many of our LDWS are lacking facilties over their complete length making it necessary to book well in advance and often missing out on sights to meet daily destination targets. I know so many who want to "do" LDWs but don't want to cary tents, stoves etc .
Too little, too late, too bad......

Lee in Doncaster

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Re: A footpath blocked by a new home
« Reply #18 on: 08:16:06, 02/08/19 »
I've used several footpaths that go through people's gardens -it's not that unusual.
Walking every week in the Peak District...or somewhere else   http://peakwalking.blogspot.com

fernman

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Re: A footpath blocked by a new home
« Reply #19 on: 09:09:26, 02/08/19 »
I followed a footpath yesterday that went up the side of a property, part of an old farm that had been converted into individual residences.
From a stile in a lane the path went straight onto the side of a drive in the garden, then through a gate. Beyond this was a narrow fenced path between a continuation of the drive on one side and a paddock on the other side, before a second gate that opened onto a crop field.
There was an abundance of signs saying Keep dogs on leads, No cycles, Keep to the footpath and Close the gate.
It just happened that someone was about to depart in a RR Discovery, he left very, very slowly and waited a long time at the exit, leaving me with the impression that he was keeping an eye on me.

Ridge

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Re: A footpath blocked by a new home
« Reply #20 on: 11:05:27, 02/08/19 »
I'm always surprised when paths through peoples properties are not well signposted. If it was me I would want people to stay on the right route.
Earlier this week we walked down a lane and then, following a sign, down a drive. When we got to the house there was no indication of where to go so we wandered round the garden for a bit before finding a stile hidden behind some shrubs.
Over hill, over dale. Thorough brush, thorough brier....
I do wander every where

barewirewalker

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Re: A footpath blocked by a new home
« Reply #21 on: 11:36:04, 02/08/19 »
It just happened that someone was about to depart in a RR Discovery, he left very, very slowly and waited a long time at the exit, leaving me with the impression that he was keeping an eye on me.
This suspicion that all strangers are 'ne'er do wells' is the historic basis of much of the problem, landowners are encouraged to think that keeping people out of the countryside improves their security. Yet the percentage of law abiding people in all walks of life shows the error in this thinking.
Technology now could link the visitor directly the occupier of that part of the countryside they are in. So the visitor could play a far greater part in rural crime watch. Many rural home owners are away from their properties more than they are in residence, yet does the criminal go about his business on foot?
The time when country people had eyes all over their demesne and not much happened that that was not commented on is long gone. The farm buildings that came in with the Norfolk rotation are converted dwellings.

The walker has replaced Old Tom, cleaning a ditch or Sid, Dick and Harry brushing the hedges of Pea Leasowe and the Thistly Furlogue as the eyes in the countryside. Yesterdays ploughmen had more chance of spotting a tramp on his way than today's contractor in a air conditioned cab with ipod, will spot wrong in a city based criminal carry goods out of a house rather than making a delivery.
Yet the landowners see countryside visitors as a reason for the insurance premiums going up, rather than a means for them to come down.
BWW
Their Land is in Our Country.