Author Topic: Unexpected product failures  (Read 530 times)

gunwharfman

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Unexpected product failures
« on: 15:37:17, 10/08/19 »
I recently walked half of the Two Moors Way over four days. Before leaving home I decided to change two items of equipment hoping that my walking experience would be enhanced. I was wrong!

This is only about me and my body, it's not a criticism of the products, it's just I think how each item affects me.

I normally wear Sorbothane boot inserts and I haven't had a blister for some time. I decided that I would make a change and this time use my pair of Superfeet's, which I always use in my off-road running shoes. They are well worn in, shaped to my feet and have always given me a very comfortable running experience.

Within a couple of hours of walking on a Dartmoor track, I knew I had a blister! Upon examination, the blister was on my inside right foot arch, in line with the edge of the Superfeet insert. I then realised why this had happened. A while ago, using trial and error, I worked out that my right foot tended to lean inwards by a few degrees. To counter this tilt I always wore a 1" length of an old shoe insert under my Sorbothane, which tilted my foot into a 90 degree position and of course from then on, no blisters.

I fitted in my Superfeets but forgot to put the 1" insert in. When I looked I could see clearly where my foot was rubbing on the Superfeet edge. Such a small error on my part and I paid the penalty. I managed to come up with a fix. I carry a small notebook with a plastic cover so I cut off a 2" x 1" strip of the plastic, folded it longways, placed it under the Superfeet, at the blister point, crossed my fingers and walked on. In the morning I soon noticed that the blister was no longer an issue and caused no further problems, comfortable walking all of the way.

I also own a khaki Craghopper hiking shirt, it was recommended by the Great Outdoors at the time and it was not expensive. Its well made, two chest pockets, one inner zipped, with snap tags to keep the sleeves rolled up and so on. I've only ever worn it once a couple of winters ago and it worked well in the cooler weather but I never did like the colour!

I decided I must wear it so took it with me to Devon and wore it for the whole of the second day. It was sunny, hot, then a couple of showers, hot again, a period of drizzle, you know, one of those sort of days! When I took it off at night, it felt damp and clammy and I assumed it would soon dry, after all its a Craghopper hiking shirt!. In the morning I noticed that as I packed it in my rucksack it still felt damp and clammy. That didn't seem to change much, I never wore it again, it still felt the same on day three, only less so. I'll not use it for hiking again, my other shirt, I can wear it for a whole day and within a short while it's as dry as a bone! I have a third hiking shirt, another brand, once it too soaks in perspiration it just never seems to dry properly. I don't use this one either.

Bigfoot_Mike

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Re: Unexpected product failures
« Reply #1 on: 17:07:24, 10/08/19 »
I generally find Craghoppers shirts dry quickly, although there are several different types and they may not always act the same. I have found recently an apparent drop in quality from Craghoppers. Sizing is not consistent and the material used in the Kiwi trousers doesnít seem as good now as it used to. I have a number of pairs of Kiwis that have lasted many years. I am not sure the recent additions will last as long.

ninthace

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Re: Unexpected product failures
« Reply #2 on: 17:31:43, 10/08/19 »
I also have had good experience of being able to wash Craghoppers shirts and wear them the following day.  I only took 3 with me to Austria recently and that was enough for the trip.  It is so humid here in Devon at present I doubt anything short of pure Teflon would dry overnight.
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fernman

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Re: Unexpected product failures
« Reply #3 on: 17:43:57, 10/08/19 »
What material does it say the shirt is on the label inside it?

ninthace

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Re: Unexpected product failures
« Reply #4 on: 18:03:40, 10/08/19 »
What material does it say the shirt is on the label inside it?
100% Polyamide.  I would add that they are my standard hiking shirt at this time of year on the moors and coasts of the SW
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Daveyboy

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Re: Unexpected product failures
« Reply #5 on: 18:38:32, 10/08/19 »
Re: Craghoppers quality - It would appear that craghoppers are aiming ther products more towards the fashion rather than the outdoor industry .

Why else would they destroy a perfectly good long standing design such as their Kiwi Trousers by reduding the amount of material used in the pockets so that you can no longer even get your hand in them !. What was once a trouser with very useful and secure pockets that are now so shallow and insecure as to be totally pointless.

I have worn craghoppers products for over 30 years but sadly I will not be purchasing any further garments from them as I feel they are no longer fit for purpose 

fernman

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Re: Unexpected product failures
« Reply #6 on: 19:06:28, 10/08/19 »
100% Polyamide.  I would add that they are my standard hiking shirt at this time of year on the moors and coasts of the SW

Thanks Ninthace, I'll go along with that, it is extremely fast-drying, but my question was aimed at Gunwharfman, who's probably either out for a run or alternatively down the pub right now.

gunwharfman

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Re: Unexpected product failures
« Reply #7 on: 10:52:01, 11/08/19 »
Didn't make it to the pub until 7. Our 5-way conversation was about cheap reading glasses, a lady who came into the pub and whilst drinking rested her mobile phone in her cleavage, (she took two phone calls and had two pints) we talked about Brexit of course, (all 5 Remainers) Donald Trump, Boris Johnson and his gang, Navy talk and concern around the pub that our wonderful barmaid is not well at the moment. A great intellectual evening, then came out of the pub to find that nothing has changed!  O0

I've had a look at the Craghopper shirt label it has a reference number C50304 (not sure if this means anything?) and its made from 65% Polyester and 35% Cotton. My other hiking shirt has cotton woven into the fabric as well.

My wife thinks that it's the cotton content that perhaps causes the 'damp and clammy' feel to both shirts?

Bigfoot_Mike

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Re: Unexpected product failures
« Reply #8 on: 11:30:41, 11/08/19 »
My older Craghoppers shirts that dry quickly are 100% polyamide. Some more recent purchases in neutral colours for a safari are 65% polyamide and 35% cotton. I havenít used the new shirts in rain or for strenuous walking, only some slow walking on the flat. It may well be that the cotton content of newer shirts makes them hold onto moisture more than the older shirts.


NB the material of the new shirts feels different to the older ones, which feel much softer. This could be due to lots of use and much washing though.

andybr

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Re: Unexpected product failures
« Reply #9 on: 11:35:26, 11/08/19 »
Not exactly a failure but an incredibly frustrating design change. I have worn Salomon 3D Ultra shoes since they originally came out as they seem to be the perfect fit for my feet. When I bought my most recent pair I discovered that they have reduced the length of the laces substantially. The shoes are still superbly comfortable when they are on but the shorter laces makes them much harder to get on in the first place. I have had to take to carrying a small shoe horn to stop the back of the shoe folding over as I try to squeeze my feet past the cuff even with the lace fully released. Why?

fernman

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Re: Unexpected product failures
« Reply #10 on: 14:37:17, 11/08/19 »
a lady who came into the pub and whilst drinking rested her mobile phone in her cleavage, (she took two phone calls and had two pints)
What, two pints resting on her bosom?  :o :o   I'd like to have seen that!

I'd agree with your wife about the cotton content of the shirts, while the two Craghoppers ones I own are a much thicker material than, say, some lightweight polcotton shirts I bought last year from my tailor Mike Ashley.

But I also own some 'technical' shirts by Patagonia, Columbia, TNF and Sprayway, bought when I was working and had the money. Some of these also have concealed air vents front and rear. They are my first choice for my annual hols in Greece.

Ninthace has told us his shirts are 100% polyamide (another name for nylon), well I have some lightweight Royal Robbins shorts the same, you could jump in a river in them and back on land they'd be dry in no time. Similarly my Tog 24 walking trousers are the same, any wet splashes on them dry in minutes.

So that is the way to go, Gunwharfman, spend a bit more on high-spec purpose-made shirts, look at the label inside before buying, to see what it's made of (it's second habit to me as I was a white goods engineer for 28 years). I have avoided buying anything largely cotton for many years, not easy because shops are fullof it, but it fades, takes much longer to dry, it can shrink, and it wears out quicker.

One last thing before I go, is there a gap between your back and your pack? I can fit a hand behind my backpack, while my daypack has a bigger gap.
« Last Edit: 14:42:40, 11/08/19 by fernman »

Bigfoot_Mike

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Re: Unexpected product failures
« Reply #11 on: 14:42:36, 11/08/19 »
The Craghoppers shirts do have air vents at the back (both old and newer versions).

fernman

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Re: Unexpected product failures
« Reply #12 on: 14:49:39, 11/08/19 »
The Craghoppers shirts do have air vents at the back (both old and newer versions).

Thank you, you're right, I remember one of my two Crags has, but my point is it's the thick the material and the clammy cotton content.
I regard mine as good robust shirts ideal for a hike on a typical British summer day of sun & cloud and 20-21C, but not for the sort of temperatures we've been experiencing this year.

ninthace

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Re: Unexpected product failures
« Reply #13 on: 15:19:22, 11/08/19 »
I regard mine as good robust shirts ideal for a hike on a typical British summer day of sun & cloud and 20-21C, but not for the sort of temperatures we've been experiencing this year.
  Now you tell me.  I've been doing it wrong all year.
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gunwharfman

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Re: Unexpected product failures
« Reply #14 on: 19:09:15, 11/08/19 »
To Fernman. I use a Osprey Exon 48L and a stiff mesh contours against my back, then an air gap, then the body of the rucksack. I use the air gap to stuff my rain skirt in so it's instantly ready for use if it rains. The rucksack body is really showing wear and tear now so the next time I hike I will use my old Lightwave model again.

Thanks for all of the information, I'll buy a new shirt soon so will look at the materials used more closely. I don't feel I've lost out with my Craghopper, it only cost me £5.99 at the time. Maybe I should have realised why it was so cheap at the time?

I'm also going to return to using my Sorbothanes in my hiking boots and carry on with the Superfeet in my running shoes.