Author Topic: Walking Trailer recommendations?  (Read 1466 times)

BackwardsBen

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Walking Trailer recommendations?
« on: 18:03:55, 24/08/19 »
Hi, basically i'm planning an extremely long walk (700+ miles), over the space of around 2-3 months. Mostly wild sleeping, but i'll be passing through some cities en route that i plan to spend a few days in.

Anyway, all of the walks i've done in the UK i've used luggage services to transport clothing, but since the walk i'm doing is based in Europe, and not an "official walking trail" so there aren't really any luggage services available to me. So i've resorted to carrying my own luggage. I have a strong backpack, capable of handling spare clothing, streaming/video equipment, camping equipment, water etc. But i'm looking to take extras, spare clothing for the city stays, extra food storage..

Basically i'm looking for recommendations for a trailer that is capable of the journey, that will attach to either my backpack, shoulders or waist as i walk and will be on wheels behind me.

Hit me up with any recommendations of any price, as i've never looked for things liekt his before so wouldn't have any idea where to start.

BackwardsBen

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Re: Walking Trailer recommendations?
« Reply #1 on: 18:05:01, 24/08/19 »
Forgot to write, thankyou in advance for the help !

ninthace

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Re: Walking Trailer recommendations?
« Reply #2 on: 18:26:20, 24/08/19 »
Can't help with the trailer but have you considered using Poste Restante to send stuff ahead rather than carry it with you?   When Nicholas Crane walked from Fisterra in Spain to Istanbul the hard way, he used it to get a clean change of undies and such!  I think it is still going, especially in Europe. https://theworklife.com/experience/poste-restante/
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vghikers

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Re: Walking Trailer recommendations?
« Reply #3 on: 18:38:19, 24/08/19 »
I've never used one and therefore can't make any recommendations, but there is the BenPacker and the HipStar that might work for you.

Ridge

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Re: Walking Trailer recommendations?
« Reply #4 on: 19:03:21, 24/08/19 »
I would not normally advocate this but, for the cost of purchase and inconvenience of dragging a cart, how about buying a few cheap clothes in each place that you want to be smart?
Over hill, over dale. Thorough brush, thorough brier....
I do wander every where

BackwardsBen

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Re: Walking Trailer recommendations?
« Reply #5 on: 19:08:35, 24/08/19 »
Can't help with the trailer but have you considered using Poste Restante to send stuff ahead rather than carry it with you?   When Nicholas Crane walked from Fisterra in Spain to Istanbul the hard way, he used it to get a clean change of undies and such!  I think it is still going, especially in Europe.

Not sure this would work, the "path" i'm walking is the Seine river in France (from English Channel to source in the mid south east), and probably the 2 major stops would be Rouen and Paris only, with the rest not even sure i'll stop at. They would probably have to hold my "post" for a month or so at a time.

Thanks for the replies though, looking into this Hipstar thing, it's pretty much what i was looking for but seems to be in preproduction?

BackwardsBen

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Re: Walking Trailer recommendations?
« Reply #6 on: 19:10:27, 24/08/19 »
I would not normally advocate this but, for the cost of purchase and inconvenience of dragging a cart, how about buying a few cheap clothes in each place that you want to be smart?

That's possible i guess. Some throw away clothing i could just donate after wearing ? Wouldn't takcle the extra food storages etc as there are routes where i'll probably be wild sleeping 5-8 nights in a row without seeing a major village worth going off route enough to visit.

ninthace

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Re: Walking Trailer recommendations?
« Reply #7 on: 19:14:59, 24/08/19 »
Not sure this would work, the "path" i'm walking is the Seine river in France (from English Channel to source in the mid south east), and probably the 2 major stops would be Rouen and Paris only, with the rest not even sure i'll stop at. They would probably have to hold my "post" for a month or so at a time.

Thanks for the replies though, looking into this Hipstar thing, it's pretty much what i was looking for but seems to be in preproduction?
  France is stiff with post offices, almost every village has one - it is something of a national institution.  If you have a UK support "team" you should be able to set it up as you will know what progress you are making so they can send stuff ahead for you.
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harland

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Re: Walking Trailer recommendations?
« Reply #8 on: 19:23:30, 24/08/19 »
I saw quite a few people walking the Camino de Santiago with a trailer.  You may have a better chance of a recommendation if you ask a question/read comments on their forum:-

https://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/?utm_source=Casa+Ivar+Newsletter&utm_campaign=acb0cdf174-AUTOMATION__1&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_b6f95f63dc-acb0cdf174-154560149&mc_cid=acb0cdf174&mc_eid=48b68264fe

ninthace

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Re: Walking Trailer recommendations?
« Reply #9 on: 19:54:15, 24/08/19 »
Why are you planning to take food to France?  The only thing I might take is Marmite.
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BackwardsBen

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Re: Walking Trailer recommendations?
« Reply #10 on: 21:43:18, 24/08/19 »
Why are you planning to take food to France?  The only thing I might take is Marmite.
Not taking food from here, taking extra food whenever i do actually stop, so that i have to stop less. With a trailer with extra food i could go 4-6 days with barely seeing any sort of village, and if i needed a rest day, i'd be better prepared.

Mel

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Re: Walking Trailer recommendations?
« Reply #11 on: 22:37:28, 24/08/19 »
There was a topic on the forum about walking trailers a good few years ago now.  If I remember rightly, the idea of it was a good one but the reality / practicality of using one proved it not fit for purpose unless you are walking along engineered tracks, paths and roads (ie. no good for steep ascents/decents or rocky or overgrown trails).



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alan de enfield

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Re: Walking Trailer recommendations?
« Reply #12 on: 08:40:39, 25/08/19 »
There was a topic on the forum about walking trailers a good few years ago now.  If I remember rightly, the idea of it was a good one but the reality / practicality of using one proved it not fit for purpose unless you are walking along engineered tracks, paths and roads (ie. no good for steep ascents/decents or rocky or overgrown trails).



Not ideal for use if the path has 'kissing gates' or stiles.

gunwharfman

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Re: Walking Trailer recommendations?
« Reply #13 on: 10:50:25, 25/08/19 »
I remember seeing such a thing being used in the Pyrenees three years ago. My memory is now hazy but I do remember that it had one wheel. I've tried to look it up, I do know that it was a German design, (it was a German walking group) and very much like the Monowalker but was not that actual brand. It looked good to me at the time though.

gunwharfman

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Re: Walking Trailer recommendations?
« Reply #14 on: 11:33:31, 25/08/19 »
Have you considered the other possibility, of carrying your stuff on your back but thought out to be as light as possible?

I'm always trying to lighten my load and I could still improve on it if I decided to re-buy certain items. For example, the size of my rucksack is 48L, more than enough space for me (I don't cook en route so have no need of the equipment to go with it) and If I repurchased I could buy an even lighter one.

If I re-purchased I could easily save some weight by buying a new tent and for me this could be a notable amount of weight to save. I don't want or need to buy a new inflatable mattress, (I use a Neo-Air) essential to me for a good nights sleep. I've already saved weight by ditching my sleeping bag by buying a sleeping quilt and I now use an air-filled pillow. I also carry with me a Sea to Summit very lightweight bowl, which I use to pack my clothing in, ideal for backpack use.

Then, of course, I take minimal clothes, basically one or two of everything and it works for me because I have a routine of finishing a day, washing the clothes I've been wearing and change into clean ones. I've stopped taking dedicated night time attire, the clean clothes I change into becomes my night attire, or I don't need to wear them because the weather temperature is in my favour. I take two pairs of underwear, one worn, with one clean and drying on the back of my rucksack. I bought them at Decathlon, about 5, incredibly good boxer type, very quick drying and so figure-hugging I often think "am I wearing any?"

I take two pairs of thin socks and two pairs of ordinary socks, which gives me variety as to what I want to wear each day, and they wash and dry easily. My boots are not heavy either, others might suggest they are but I've never really given much thought to bought weight at all.

Again if I repurchased I could also buy two lighter quick drying baselayers than I use at present. My outer jacket is a very light windshell and I carry a very lightweight Alkpit warm jacket, working together they keep me as warm as I want to be. I obviously would have to rethink a bit for the colder months.

The reason why I ask is, have you considered taking a light load on your back? If you are in good enough health to carry a rucksack then would a light load be better for you than a trolley? I walked a very long hike three years ago and I didn't find it difficult to carry my rucksack, even at the weight I was carrying at the time.

I won't be repurchasing a lot of new equipment myself, I'm 74 now and I'm just not sure for how long I can, or even want to continue long-distance hiking. I can only look back and wished I made better equipment decisions in one go rather than the drips and drabs way that I actually did it.

Even today I only carry two noticeably heavy items, water and my Anker phone battery, 12 oz.