Author Topic: Daypack advice required  (Read 1571 times)

Man wae a dug

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Daypack advice required
« on: 20:12:37, 17/09/19 »
Hi, new to this and I'm in the process of pulling some kit together so I can start taking my wee dog into the hills from next spring. I was hoping I could get some pointers on things I'm looking for. The plan is to get him out on some walks early next year (increasing duration) a few easy local hills and maybe a couple of days in Arran for Goatfell in summer to prep both of us for the West Highland Way the following spring.


I've got myself a Berghaus 5000 extrem vented jacket, Berghaus paclite over trousers, decent waterproof boots and some walking trousers sorted already (needed to get these for walking the dog anyway).

At the moment I'm looking into rucksacks.

What I'm now looking around for is a pack that will carry all the essentials for both of us on these walks (time wise think on us being out most of the day) but also (if possible) be capable of taking the requisite gear for an overnight in local hills (day out, night camping, day back), maybe enough to squeeze a sleeping bag in and attach a tent and mat externally if I couldn't cram it into a daypack?


I'm not wanting a full on massive pack for now, i'll get that (nearer the time when I'm ready for WHW) when I have a better idea of what I actually do need to carry and not what I think I need to carry if that makes sense?


My problem is I have zero idea of what makes are good, what ones give you most bang for the buck and which ones to avoid. Also, I have no idea what size in litres I'll need just now. 


I looked at Osprey and Lowe and sized myself using the app with Osprey as MD M/L if that helps?


All I know is I'd like a big outside pocket for my jacket and one of those ones that hold it away from your back (I will sweat a lot carrying it). Waterproof would be best (or a built in cover?) I'm not too fussed about the weight of this pack, lighter would be good but I'd be happy with a heavier one if it fulfilled my requirements. Do I need a built in water pack thingy? 


I'd be happy spending around £100 for one that will last me......happier spending less obviously lol.


The problem is there is way too many options out there, can anyone give me some advice on this please?   Thanks in advance.



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Mel

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Re: Daypack advice required
« Reply #1 on: 20:29:05, 17/09/19 »
I have an Osprey Tempest 20 (litre) rucksack for full on day walks in the hills.  Fits everything I need into it.  It has an outside stretchy pocket that I stuff my jacket into and an "airzone" back which flexes as you move so it keeps the air flowing on your back - I've found this more effective than the concave packs that hold the pack away from your back and they don't seem to have as much internal storage either. 




For you and your pooch for day walks I'd say look at 30 litre packs.


If it was me, I'd be looking at an additional pack for multi-day walks where I needed to carry a tent, sleeping bag, etc.



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gary m

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Re: Daypack advice required
« Reply #2 on: 20:35:47, 17/09/19 »
I like a deuter rucksack, very strongly made, any of the good makes will give you a good bag. As Mel said a 30 litre bag is good for a long day walk, but I can't get all my gear in it for a night out. I have tried an osprey bag but I did not feel it was the bag for me, as I like a bag tight to my back
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gary m

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Re: Daypack advice required
« Reply #3 on: 20:37:17, 17/09/19 »
Ps Mel said a 20 litre which would be OK too, I had 30 litres to carry crampons etc
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Islandplodder

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Re: Daypack advice required
« Reply #4 on: 20:49:44, 17/09/19 »
I have a Lowe Alpine airzone daypack, just been looking at it to see how big it is and it doesn't seem to say... I think it's about 20 litres and I use it most of the time for day walks.  I also have a Deuter 35 for when I have more stuff, winter, or if I am away for a couple of days.  I don't carry camping stuff.
The trouble is, the iseal number of rucksacks is one more than you already have.....

Man wae a dug

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Re: Daypack advice required
« Reply #5 on: 20:55:37, 17/09/19 »
Thanks Mel. I'll have a look around the 30 litre options.

Does the 'airzone' sit against your back or just off it? 

Yeah, I will be getting an additional pack for being away a few days, I was (maybe naively) hoping I could get away with one pack to cover a one night camp as well as using it for a day pack.

I had looked at Osprey,  are their rucksacks pretty good and capable of lasting a good few years?

@Gary M -   Thanks. Deuter is a name I hadn't heard of, I'll have a look at those as well.  I'd prefer a bag to be tight on my back myself, but I really need to lessen the 'back sweat' as much as possible. It'll have to be a trade off here as I know that I will get very hot n sweaty when walking so want to avoid the dark triangle on my back as best I can.  :)
Be ye man or bairn or wumman
Be ye gaun or be ye comin
For Scotlands pride no Scotlands shame
Gether yer litter and tak it hame!

Man wae a dug

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Re: Daypack advice required
« Reply #6 on: 20:57:37, 17/09/19 »
@ Islandplodder  -  The 'one is too many, a hundred is not enough' is what I'm hoping to avoid. lol
Be ye man or bairn or wumman
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Mel

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Re: Daypack advice required
« Reply #7 on: 21:27:12, 17/09/19 »
[/font]Does the 'airzone' sit against your back or just off it? 
[/font]


Sort of just off it but not visibly noticeably so.  Works better than concave for the reasons I said above.  And it certainly works better than a "flat" backed pack  ;D


I think sweaty backs of some degree are an occupational hazard of carrying something on your back.  Wear a wicking tee shirt - the material doesn't go dark like cotton and dries in the blink of an eye.


I had looked at Osprey,  are their rucksacks pretty good and capable of lasting a good few years?


I've had mine about 5 years - no real signs of wear apart from the sheep poo and grass stains.  The white bits are looking a bit grubby too  :-\   Yes, the material's waterproof but horizontal rain can get in through zips.  I still put things in plastic bags inside just to be on the safe side.  I have a hi-viz flourescent rain cover too which I got for free at work. I don't think I'd buy a rain cover though - especially given the price of them for what they are.







No expense spared in pursuit of a bargain ;)
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WhitstableDave

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Re: Daypack advice required
« Reply #8 on: 21:57:54, 17/09/19 »
Ah, a subject dear to my heart!  :)

I love buying new gear and if I can find something better than what I've already got, I'll get it.

But I've never wanted a new backpack because I've never seen or tried one that's better than the one I've got. It's a 30 litre one that I bought at Mountain Warehouse about three years ago for about £30 (certainly no more than that).

It's got an air-back (a curved mesh frame), belt pockets (flapjacks in the left, car keys in the right), and compartments of the right sizes in the right places. I can unzip/zip the lowest rear pocket to get or stow my hat without breaking my stride. It's perfect for me!  :)

Believe me, if I could find a better backpack with a walking-cred designer label for £100 or more, then I'd buy it. But I can't, so I don't.  ;)

sussamb

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Re: Daypack advice required
« Reply #9 on: 22:15:24, 17/09/19 »
Look at the Lowe Alpine Airzone 35:45


This is basically a 35L sac with a floating lid, so can be extended to 45L when needed. I use it as a day sac and use the floating lid when I'm doing long distance walks.


It also has a 'spider' on the back, which will hold additional kit, it's where I stuff my wet waterproof when I take it off.


https://www.amazon.co.uk/Lowe-Alpine-AirZone-Backpack-35-45/dp/B00PLD3TL8
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Percy

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Re: Daypack advice required
« Reply #10 on: 22:20:59, 17/09/19 »
Anyone suggesting you need a 35-45 litre pack for day walks is a nutter.


In the height of summer I can get away with an 11 litre pack. Admittedly it can be something of a squeeze.


Iíve also got a 22 litre pack which is absolutely ample for summer and all year round save the depths of winter.

ninthace

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Re: Daypack advice required
« Reply #11 on: 22:33:41, 17/09/19 »
I have an Osprey Kestrel 35 litre that I use as a daypack for 2 people.  Wee doggie will need a bowl and such and since he/she is wee, a doggie pack is out of the question, though I have seen larger dogs carrying their own kit.  Osprey packs are indeed very good quality and their after sales service is excellent too.  If you use poles, the Osprey pole stowage is good too and can be used without breaking step.
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Dread

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Re: Daypack advice required
« Reply #12 on: 22:37:34, 17/09/19 »
Fleece, waterproof, water, snacks, headtorch, camera, battery, sticks, map, glasses to read map, first aid, it all adds up. I have an Osprey Stratos 36 which I got as a cheap return, £42. They are around £100 new which is a bit steep. Nice pack, fits me nicely. No big pocket for your jacket though. I do have a smaller 25l which would do for day hikes but it doesn't fit as well so I prefer the bigger one.

Mel

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Re: Daypack advice required
« Reply #13 on: 22:52:01, 17/09/19 »
So, as you can see Man wae a dug, we all have different sized and styled packs for different reasons, preferences and uses  ;D


My first "proper rucksack" was a 35ltr Lowe Alpine one.  I sacked that off because it was too big for my needs on general day walks (felt bulky and cumbersome for a rain mac and some sarnies) and I got my ponytail stuck in the back of it when I looked upwards  ;D


I've just thought of something else, a 35ltr pack might have been too big for me (at 5ft 5in) but if you're a strapping 6ft+ bloke then it might be a perfect size. 


WhitstableDave - I wish that Mountain Warehouse pack had been around when I was looking - sounds very similar to my Osprey. 


Edit: just seen Dread's reply re size/ratio
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sussamb

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Re: Daypack advice required
« Reply #14 on: 06:45:40, 18/09/19 »
Anyone suggesting you need a 35-45 litre pack for day walks is a nutter.


I guarantee I'm not  ;)


Just because its 35L you don't have to fill it. The advantage is that does me for day walks, overnighters and LDWs.  Saves cluttering up the house with a multitude of packs  O0
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