Author Topic: Are Camoflauge clothes and bags, tents legal in Scotland and the Rest of UK ?  (Read 1208 times)

LP96

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Hi All


I know in some countries it is not allowed due to various reasons.


I have been gifted a very expensive military tent camoflauge colour.


I am also considering buying some camoflauge clothing  and a backpack.


So my question is. Is it legal to use camoflauge equipment,clothing etc. Without any issues?  ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D


Pitboot

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Yes, there's no problem with that in the UK. As one who has worn what you call camouflage clothing professionally for many years I cannot comprehend why you would want to, when non camo gear that has been made specifically for outdoor leisure use is available everywhere, and it's not made by the lowest bidder.


I know that in some African countries and also parts of the Caribbean wearing military gear that you are not entitled to will get you put in jail.


And some may say, with some justification, that you will also look like a wally.

richardh1905

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Welcome to the forum, LP96  :)


As Pitboot says, perfectly legal in the UK, so your gifted tent will be fine. Could be useful if you are into stealth wild camping in England and Wales, where it is not allowed without the permission of the landowner (exceptions Lake District fells, some parts of Dartmoor) - but don't lose your tent in the mist of you pop out for a pee - nearly happened to me in Torridon. :o


Unless you are hunting, fishing or trying to spot elusive wildlife, no need for camo clothing/rucksack. If you insist upon camo, then you will be severely restricting your choice - and olive green is pretty inconspicuous anyway, if you want to stay discreet whilst wild camping.

Mel

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.... stealth wild camping in England and Wales, where it is not allowed without the permission of the landowner (exceptions Lake District fells, some parts of Dartmoor) ...


I'm fairly sure wildcamping on the Lake District fells isn't "legal" (not in the same way as it is on some parts of Dartmoor).  Strictly speaking, landowner permission is needed.  I think it is perhaps tolerated "above the highest fence-line" where landowners/farmers know people do it, but turn a blind eye - most likely because trying to police it would be an impossible task!


Am willing to be corrected on that ^^^^ if something's changed and the link above isn't up to date though  :)



No expense spared in pursuit of a bargain ;)
https://snailspacewalks.blogspot.co.uk/

richardh1905

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Fair comment Mel - Tolerated rather than legal.


National Trust seem pretty relaxed about it, as long as you are on the fells, and are discreet.


https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/features/wild-camping-in-the-lake-district



Dyffryn Ardudwy

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I see no reason why you cannot use a high quality camouflage tent on your travels.
What most landowners are concerned about, are campers who do not first ask their permission if they can use their land.
If your camping in a designated area, designed for camping, leave the area pristine, free of any litter, and respect the area you are camping in.

The thing i noticed the most, whilst visiting Tobermorey on Mull, was how clean the area was, not a bit of litter in sight, no graphitti, just the perfect little seaside town on the West coast.


The same applied to the various campsites i saw on my travels, they were all immaculate, with hardly any litter in sight.


I have no idea if theres a different code of conduct for visitors to the remoter areas of Scotland, but the respect shown by virtually all its visitors was most refreshing to see.

I do not believe there are any rules or regulations on the kind of tents us walkes are allowed to use on our travels.

Arrive, pitch up the tent, and leave as if you were never there at all.

If you intend to wild camp, and know the area is owned by a local farmer, seek their permission first, its goes without saying, respect a farmers property and way of life, and hopefully they will respect you, by giving their blessing for an overnight stay on their land.
« Last Edit: 17:35:13, 23/09/19 by Dyffryn Ardudwy »

Man wae a dug

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Provided the game keeper doesn't find the salmon and venison stashed in the tent, camo gear wont get you into trouble in the UK. ;)
Be ye man or bairn or wumman
Be ye gaun or be ye comin
For Scotlands pride no Scotlands shame
Gether yer litter and tak it hame!

Mel

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A camo tent would probably be useless if you're stashing dead fish and meat in it - the gamekeeper would smell you a mile off  :D   ;D   ;)



No expense spared in pursuit of a bargain ;)
https://snailspacewalks.blogspot.co.uk/

Man wae a dug

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Fair comment.  ;D
Be ye man or bairn or wumman
Be ye gaun or be ye comin
For Scotlands pride no Scotlands shame
Gether yer litter and tak it hame!

fernman

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I think I'm a bit of an exception amongst most walkers in that I go out of my way to wear olive, brown and green clothing that blends in with the landscape, and the same applies to most of my backpacking/wild camping equipment, although I'm not so committed that everything is camo.
I think I would prefer a camo tent, though, because my green one and its predecessor is a green that sticks out like a sore thumb when it is pitched in the hills.

My walking clothing does mean that I'd be difficult to find in a rescue situation, but it's a risk I'm prepared to take.

Anyway, welcome to the forum LP96, and you'll be alright so long as you don't start hanging around car parks at night in camo gear, with your infrared binoculars  :D .

richardh1905

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The difference between drab colours and camo is the difference between being inconspicuous and hiding.

tonyk

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ninthace

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The hunters I associated with in France used to go out in camo gear. The effect was somewhat marred by the high vis hats that we all wore so they didnít shoot each other or me.  Presumably deer and wild boar canít see fluorescent orange.  In which case, I wonder why we didnít all wear motorway menders outfits?
Solvitur Ambulando

KimE

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Deers cant see red or blue as we do a small pattern blend in more than large areas in the same colour. I know a hunter who has a orange, red and blue camo jacket. Wildboars can see blue but not red. Predators and birds can see most colors so for them a camoflage pattern are useful or you can just wear dull coloured green or grey. My best camoset are just white. A camo pattern are only useful if you use it in the right environment then you use green camo in a city you are clearly visible. Modern leave pattern mixed with red or bright yellow are in fashion by modern Swedish hunters.

 https://www.engelsons.se/jaktstall-fagelsjo-jacka-byxa

Slogger

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Outdoor hill clothing, jackets in particular are often made in bright colours and camouflage clothing is discouraged by mountain rescue teams. The reason is obvious, if you are in trouble and in need of rescue they will not be able to locate you if you don't stand out from the sourroundings,as easily as if you wear bright attire.