Author Topic: Baggage Transfer - Positives and Negatives  (Read 2991 times)

Slogger

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Re: Baggage Transfer - Positives and Negatives
« Reply #30 on: 20:12:36, 07/10/19 »

As well as benefits for the walker there are also benefits for the many small, often isolated, village communities.
Very true. perhaps especially the Coast to Coast route where you really have to book almost a year ahead during the 'season'. Not baggage carrying as such, but for example the Spine race. In January when things are generally very quiet in Edale, for one weekend anyway, accomodation, pubs etc are booked out for miles around with competitors. The pub, cage, shop trade benefit too as they move up the Pennine Way, then at the finish in Kirk Yetholm, booked out there too.

tonyk

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Re: Baggage Transfer - Positives and Negatives
« Reply #31 on: 14:22:31, 08/10/19 »
When I do a LDW I carry all my kit, I'm not going to a fashion show so don't need anything that won't fit in 45L  O0
Same here.Baggage transfer is about leaving all the junk at home rather than paying someone to transfer your junk when on a walk.If people are struggling to carry a 10-12 kg load on a walk they need more training in load carrying.

harland

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Re: Baggage Transfer - Positives and Negatives
« Reply #32 on: 14:48:28, 08/10/19 »
Same here.Baggage transfer is about leaving all the junk at home rather than paying someone to transfer your junk when on a walk.If people are struggling to carry a 10-12 kg load on a walk they need more training in load carrying.
Is this another wind up like Slogger's? ;D

rural roamer

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Re: Baggage Transfer - Positives and Negatives
« Reply #33 on: 15:34:24, 08/10/19 »
Just in case my post above has upset anyone, it was a joke. I feel that I may be coming to that time shortly where if i want to carry on doing long distance trails I may have to stop carrying my own gear and use such a service. It will of course cost much more than wild camping with the odd b&b. These services have indeed opened up the trails to people who for one reason or another wouldn't do the routes if they had to carry everything, but there is more than one way to follow a route and these services facilitate that.


We’ve spent far less on holidays abroad! Nearly three weeks walking the Pennine Way, a different B&B each night (so no discounts!), a meal out every night, baggage transfer, getting to/ from start and finish and possibly car parking. Did I leave anything out? That was one of our most expensive holidays ever! Not that we’re complaining.

Deolman

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Re: Baggage Transfer - Positives and Negatives
« Reply #34 on: 15:47:53, 08/10/19 »
Is this another wind up like Slogger's? ;D


I would certainly hope so

tonyk

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Re: Baggage Transfer - Positives and Negatives
« Reply #35 on: 19:47:47, 08/10/19 »
Is this another wind up like Slogger's? ;D
I wasn't being 100% serious but I have often found that people staying in hostels are carrying,or struggling with,loads far heavier than those carried by walkers with tents,sleeping bags etc.Its not surprising they are paying someone to transfer kit.

Deolman

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Re: Baggage Transfer - Positives and Negatives
« Reply #36 on: 19:56:28, 08/10/19 »
I wasn't being 100% serious but I have often found that people staying in hostels are carrying,or struggling with,loads far heavier than those carried by walkers with tents,sleeping bags etc.Its not surprising they are paying someone to transfer kit.


That may be true in some cases but many others, such as myself, carry a day bag with just sufficient for the day.i.e. waterproofs, spare socks, packed lunch, and first aid/ emergency kit. As my health has deteriorated over the years I could not risk walking an LDW without the use of B&B’s and a baggage transfer service.

rural roamer

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Re: Baggage Transfer - Positives and Negatives
« Reply #37 on: 22:21:59, 08/10/19 »

That may be true in some cases but many others, such as myself, carry a day bag with just sufficient for the day.i.e. waterproofs, spare socks, packed lunch, and first aid/ emergency kit. As my health has deteriorated over the years I could not risk walking an LDW without the use of B&B’s and a baggage transfer service.


What he said!  O0

Mel

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Re: Baggage Transfer - Positives and Negatives
« Reply #38 on: 23:19:17, 08/10/19 »
So, to summarise then….
 
Positives of using baggage transfer – someone else is doing all the fetching and carrying so you can enjoy the walk and enjoy some creature comforts at the end of the day that you wouldn’t normally carry.
 
Negatives of using baggage transfer – your peers will think you’re a lily-livered pansy if you don’t trudge along with the weight of the world on your back, for fun/pleasure/self-flagellation as you try to prove to your 70 year old self that you can still “make it” into the SAS if you wanted to.


 ;)


*sits back and waits to see if she gets a nibble....*


 
 
No expense spared in pursuit of a bargain ;)
https://snailspacewalks.blogspot.co.uk/

jimbob

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Re: Baggage Transfer - Positives and Negatives
« Reply #39 on: 00:59:40, 09/10/19 »
Surely, Mel, the porterage of the equipment is the duty of the valet, with assistance from the undergardener.

One needs a decent port after the roast of an evening. Can't trust thebumkins to provide the decent quaff, can we. Sometimes the groom carries the hip bath and commode so that personal ablutions can be assured at all times.

No need for day packs the parlour maid ensures refreshments are available at the correct hour with linen provided by the chambermaid.

Preparation and planning are what makes a stroll in the country so invigorating.
Too little, too late, too bad......

rural roamer

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Re: Baggage Transfer - Positives and Negatives
« Reply #40 on: 08:17:39, 09/10/19 »
Yep you’ve got that about right Mel!  ;D  Even if they were being serious I don’t care anyway, I’ll do it my way.
 We haven’t got onto those that attempt LDWs with little or no navigation skills or walking training yet! I would concede that baggage transfer services and perhaps more so the “package” walks make it easier for those people to undertake walks they may not have considered before.

pdstsp

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Re: Baggage Transfer - Positives and Negatives
« Reply #41 on: 13:26:44, 09/10/19 »
I can definitely see the advantage particularly for health reasons, or if you want to take a few luxuries.  Just had a quick look on the Sherpa site and they seem to charge about £8 - £9 per bag per day, so for an 11 day C2C around £90-£100, which is not too bad in my opinion. 


For me, my kit, over and above what is in the day bag anyway, is only a lightweight pair of trousers, spare walking t shirt and boxers, light shoes, my kindle, toothbrush and razor.  The weight is pretty much negligible so I am happy to carry it.  I also quite like being self-sufficient - but only to an extent - no camping gear in my bag!  So there, you lily-livered pansies  ;D


As far as "fun/pleasure/self-flagellation" goes, I was taught by the Christian Brothers so this is an important part of my suffering[size=78%].[/size] :)



 

barewirewalker

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Re: Baggage Transfer - Positives and Negatives
« Reply #42 on: 14:11:06, 09/10/19 »
Surely, Mel, the porterage of the equipment is the duty of the valet, with assistance from the undergardener.

One needs a decent port after the roast of an evening. Can't trust thebumkins to provide the decent quaff, can we. Sometimes the groom carries the hip bath and commode so that personal ablutions can be assured at all times.

No need for day packs the parlour maid ensures refreshments are available at the correct hour with linen provided by the chambermaid.

Preparation and planning are what makes a stroll in the country so invigorating.
The problem with such expectations is the usual 500 acre X zone around the location of such comforts. As with Harry Cotterell OBE, who lives in an area of 11 square miles bare of any footpaths and desires to preserve the privileges of his ageing pater;
Quote
Cotterell baronetsThe Cotterell Baronetcy, of Garnons in the County of Hereford, is a title in the Baronetage of the United Kingdom. It was created on 2 November 1805 for John Cotterell, Member of Parliament for Herefordshire for many years. The third Baronet also represented this constituency in the House of Commons. The fourth Baronet was Lord-Lieutenant of Herefordshire.
You would have to be able to phone a friend of a fiend, high up on the county list to get past the gatehouse.
BWW
Their Land is in Our Country.

Deolman

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Re: Baggage Transfer - Positives and Negatives
« Reply #43 on: 14:29:51, 09/10/19 »
There are a number of baggage services along the C2C. I have used C2C Packhorse as they were a little bit cheaper than Sherpa. They are based in Kirby Stephen and Sherpa are based in Richmond.  On some of the shorter LDW's Sherpa will charge for a min of 2 bags.  By doing my own planning I can save several hundred pounds compared to paying for a package and I can generally get a B & B no more than half a mile from the trail.



ninthace

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Re: Baggage Transfer - Positives and Negatives
« Reply #44 on: 16:34:34, 09/10/19 »


Mel and friends stop for a light lunch during their walk round Lady Bower
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