Author Topic: Stiffness: Altberg Fremington v Altberg Tethera  (Read 538 times)

HikeMike

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I picked up a pair of Tethera’s off ebay. Happy enough with them but would be nice to have a little more rolling action / less stiff sole.
Does anyone have sufficient experience of these two, to make a comparison, in this regard?
From Altberg website:
Fremington: midsole 2-3 season, multi terrain
Tethera: midsole 3 season, rough terrain support and flex resistance
Maybe there’s other Altberg boots to consider, bearing in mind I want max water protection – full thick leather/minimum stitching. The Tethera has the advantage of the all-in-one 'bellows' tongue, but I’m willing to compromise on that if the Fremington rolls better.

motorlaunch

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Re: Stiffness: Altberg Fremington v Altberg Tethera
« Reply #1 on: 15:45:22, 01/11/19 »
I have Altberg Nordkapp boots which are similar to the Tethera. I don't  tie the laces up to the top hooks stopping at the one below. This allows my foot to flex up more.

kinkyboots

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Re: Stiffness: Altberg Fremington v Altberg Tethera
« Reply #2 on: 15:53:04, 01/11/19 »
I've owned both the Tethera and Fremington in the past and apart from the Fremington being lower on the ankle in my opinion I personally didn't find that much difference between the sole stiffness/flex of both boots although the Fremington did have slightly more flex due to the thinner 2.0-2.2mm leather used in their construction.

I've since replaced both boots with the Nordkapp (3 Season) and Malham (2-3 Season) which fit and suit my feet much better with the added bonus for me that I now have a closer/better fitting heel and more wiggle room in the toe box. Both these boots have a more pronounced curve to the forefoot of the sole which does give a slight rolling action in use. The Malham is lower on the ankle and is constructed from a soft and supple Nappone 1.6-1.8mm leather rather than the thicker 2.4-2.6mm Nubuck leather used in the Nordkapp and this difference in thickness and type of leather definitely does give more flex in the Malham. This might be worth a read https://www.altberg.co.uk/a-forme/

The A-Forme last may or may not suit your feet so I would suggest that you really need to visit an Altberg stockist and try them so you can compare them against the fit of the Tethera you already own. You will obviously need to make an allowance for the leather being quite stiff when they're new but it will gradually soften and conform to the shape of your feet over time with wear.
« Last Edit: 11:49:36, 02/11/19 by kinkyboots »

HikeMike

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Re: Stiffness: Altberg Fremington v Altberg Tethera
« Reply #3 on: 21:15:21, 03/11/19 »
Thanks for your replies.

I have Altberg Nordkapp boots which are similar to the Tethera. I don't  tie the laces up to the top hooks stopping at the one below. This allows my foot to flex up more.

Interesting.

Quote
I've owned both the Tethera and Fremington in the past and apart from the Fremington being lower on the ankle in my opinion I personally didn't find that much difference between the sole stiffness/flex of both boots although the Fremington did have slightly more flex due to the thinner 2.0-2.2mm leather used in their construction.

Not what I was hoping.

I've since replaced both boots with the Nordkapp (3 Season) and Malham (2-3 Season) which fit and suit my feet much better with the added bonus for me that I now have a closer/better fitting heel and more wiggle room in the toe box. Both these boots have a more pronounced curve to the forefoot of the sole which does give a slight rolling action in use. The Malham is lower on the ankle and is constructed from a soft and supple Nappone 1.6-1.8mm leather rather than the thicker 2.4-2.6mm Nubuck leather used in the Nordkapp and this difference in thickness and type of leather definitely does give more flex in the Malham.

That a-forme last/fit sounds similar to my preference. How did you find sole flex, Nordkapp/Malham vs Tethera/Fremington? Itís a shame Altberg donít give a flex rating for their boots, to give more understanding of their range. Online reviewers Gough give ratings out of ten. Their only Altberg reviews I could find are for the Keld 7/10 and Kidson 8/10 for stiffness.

The A-Forme last may or may not suit your feet so I would suggest that you really need to visit an Altberg stockist and try them so you can compare them against the fit of the Tethera you already own. You will obviously need to make an allowance for the leather being quite stiff when they're new but it will gradually soften and conform to the shape of your feet over time with wear.

I have little opportunity to travel, at present. Being in Essex Iím a long way from any Altberg dealers. Thereís Silvermans in east London, but they only stock the combat style etc.


« Last Edit: 21:37:57, 03/11/19 by HikeMike »

HikeMike

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Re: Stiffness: Altberg Fremington v Altberg Tethera
« Reply #4 on: 21:39:55, 03/11/19 »
I'm new to the forum. I don't know why kinkyboots quotes didn't seperate. I've bolded my replies. ^
« Last Edit: 21:56:38, 03/11/19 by HikeMike »

kinkyboots

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Re: Stiffness: Altberg Fremington v Altberg Tethera
« Reply #5 on: 08:04:37, 04/11/19 »
That a-forme last/fit sounds similar to my preference. How did you find sole flex, Nordkapp/Malham vs Tethera/Fremington?

The level of flex in any boot mainly comes from a combination of the midsole which is hidden from view between the base of the boot and the sole unit and the type and thickness of leather used in the construction.

The Nordkapp and Tethera are very similar as the design of the Nordkapp was based on the Tethera. The flex or lack of it is about the same but the Nordkapp has the advantage of a higher rubber rand which gives better protection to the toe area at the front of the boot. I would suggest that both these boots are overkill for use on the Essex trails, woodlands and fields as both these boots are designed for higher level walking which is why they are stiffer.

The Malham and Fremington use different leathers and from my experience I would say there is a bit more flex in the Malham and it has more of a rolling action.

For use on the Essex trails, woodlands, fields where you walk I would suggest that the Malham would be a more than capable boot.

Obviously the sensible advice would be not to buy without trying them first unless you are absolutely certain that you can return them.

I would also recommend that you invest in some decent Gore-Tex or eVent gaiters. There's no need to spend a fortune something like the Trekmates Cairngorm GTX gaiters can be bought for around £20.