Author Topic: Walking trainers or boots  (Read 333 times)

RiZa0444

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Walking trainers or boots
« on: 16:29:36, 04/03/20 »
Hi all,
I'm after some help choosing some walking trainers or boots. Whilst I am not looking to go off hiking up mountains etc I do spend a fair bit of time walking from place to place, usually either on fields or pavements in town. The problem I have is I struggle with heel padding where I tend to wear away various trainers I have tried before and get a lot of blisters as well as having cracked heels at times and flat feet so I was wondering if anyone could suggest anything?
Many thanks

gunwharfman

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Re: Walking trainers or boots
« Reply #1 on: 17:00:08, 04/03/20 »
As I understand it there are three types of boots, high, midi and walking shoes, and two types to choose from, all leather or a combination of leather and fabrics.

Obviously I do not know your feet but if you get heel blisters you might look into buying ladies' footwear next time? I had problems with blisters at one time and changing to ladies' boots helped to solve my problems. When you write 'cracked heels' do you mean you have dry and hard skin problems? If so my suggestion is to find a way of softening you skin, I firmly believe that to avoid blisters and cracked skin it's better to have supple skin.

Also, I bought a new pair of boots recently and one heel had a small bump under the heel leather, I just bashed the area with a hammer to flatten it out and the problem is now solved. Sorry, I know nothing about flat feet but would a footwear inserts help? I always use Sorbothanes, they work well for me.

ninthace

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Re: Walking trainers or boots
« Reply #2 on: 17:27:38, 04/03/20 »
You have several issues.  If you get blisters, your shoes do not fit properly, the heel cracking is probably caused by incorrect skin care, possibly aggravated by ill fitting footwear.  In particular, if you get a build up of hard skin on your heel it is likely to crack and once it starts it is hard to stop recurring without addressing the route cause.  The choice of boots or shoes is a personal one, if you are not going into rough and/or boggy country you do not need boots but you may benefit from their support. This time of year with the weather we have had, boots would be best, probably with gaiters too if you are going off road!
Get properly fitted footwear - buy from a shop that knows what they are doing rather than a budget outlet.  Walking long distances is not the same as wandering round town,.
If you have hard skin build up, sand it off with Ped Egg or something similar. Use a foot cream.
You can buy products from a pharmacy to seal cracked heels.
Never igonore a blister, at the first sign of soreness apply a Compeed (do not use cheao versions - the don't work.
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Sevenup

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Re: Walking trainers or boots
« Reply #3 on: 19:04:39, 04/03/20 »
Iím getting a bit old. My knees can be a bit dodgy but I walk rough tracks with the dogs daily. Iíve discovered the delights of Hoka boots and cross country running shoes. Www.sportsshoes.com is where I buy them (only ever in the sale -too dear otherwise). I usually buy 2-3 pairs at a time and that will last me just over a year. I use Toa boots in the winter fir low level paths like WHW. Reasonably waterproof half boot. For the summer I use Speedgoat boots which are cross country running boots. I have a pair of their hill walking boots for more rugged walking away from established hill paths and walkers tracks. The Toas, although light arefine for the likes of Ben Lomond, Ben narnain and hills with well established paths. Too light for serious winter hill walking featuring ice and snow. A feature of them all is superb cushioning (garish colour schemes too). I know my shoes need replaced when my knee begins to hurt on long walks. I regularly walk 20-30000 steps 3-4 days a week and 10k steps at least on 2 days so I get a lot of use and push shoes to their limits.

kinkyboots

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Re: Walking trainers or boots
« Reply #4 on: 19:20:23, 04/03/20 »
A lot depends on what budget you have available or are prepared to spend?

Given your previous problems it sounds like you have had a series of badly fitting footwear which have not suited or fit your feet at all and in view if that I would suggest that you need the knowledge, advice and expertise of a professional bootfitter to ensure this is not repeated. Good bootfitters are are few and far between so you may need to travel a fair distance to find a good one and they don't come cheap.

If they are within a reasonable travelling distance I would highly recommend a visit to Whalley Warm & Dry https://www.whalleyoutdoor.co.uk/boot-fitting-service/ who are an Altberg Premier Retailer and I cannot recommend their boot fitting service highly enough. Customers travel from all over the country to use their boot fitting skills and services and are highly recommended by many other forum members.

Depending on your budget the following models may be suitable options for you to look at.

2-3 Season Boots
Altberg Fremington Men's 1412g RRP £184.99 (standard last with 5 width fittings) https://www.altberg.co.uk/boots/5-width-fitting-boots/fremington-men
Altberg Malham Men's 1344g RRP £189.99 (A-Forme last with 1 medium width fitting) https://www.altberg.co.uk/boots/aforme-boots13/malham
Altberg Keld Unisex 1428g RRP £199.99 (G-Fit last with 1 wide width high volume fitting) https://www.altberg.co.uk/boots/gfit-boots/keld

Altberg's standard last is available in 5 width fittings from Extra Narrow to Extra Wide. If the model of a boot made on the standard last doesn't quite fit or suit your particular foot shape, width and volume it's a fairly safe be that a boot made on the A-Forme or G-Fit lasts will. All Altberg boots can be resoled if and when the need arises.

Expensive walking boots and lots of pavement/tarmac walking are not a good combination due to the high friction levels involved and sole wear. For pavement/tarmac walking training shoes or trail shoes would probably be a better option.

As a budget option for low level walking or daily dog walking I would recommend that you also look at the Altberg Defender military boots available via eBay. New from around £55 upwards or used from around £25 upwards and cheap enough to replace as and when they wear out. Unfortunately there's nowhere to try these on as they're not available to the general public so getting the right fit is a bit of a gamble and trial and error. If you make a sizing error just sell them on.

https://www.altberg.co.uk/boots/military-issue-boots10/mens-defender-combat-boot

Any issues you are having with flat feet could be resolved by the purchase and use of appropriate after market insoles.

As already mentioned your first step is to start trying to soften and remove the hard skin on your feet & heels with daily washing combined with the use of a footcream. The process does take some time and you must persist with the daily routine to achieve results.

vghikers

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Re: Walking trainers or boots
« Reply #5 on: 19:28:38, 04/03/20 »
Quote
The problem I have is I struggle with heel padding...

Pay attention first to footbeds, regardless of the type of footwear. With a firm cupped heel and an arch to suit your foot shape, many walking problems in the rear of the foot disappear. There are a few makes and models, we use Superfeet Trailblazers.
On mainly hard surfaces, good cushioning is important and it isn't easy to judge in a shop. Our Merrell Moabs have very good cushioning. We also have a pair of Columbia Peakfreaks, cushioning not quite as good as the Moabs.

Quote
Iíve discovered the delights of Hoka boots and cross country running shoes

I've been wanting to try Hokas, if only there was a retailer that stocked them  :(

SteamyTea

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Re: Walking trainers or boots
« Reply #6 on: 22:10:11, 04/03/20 »
I had a spell of cracked heels, then, just by chance, I read in one of my comics that it can be caused by the silicone is shampoos and some body washes.
Got my head shaved, less shampoo, made sure that I was not standing in the 'bubbles' for very long.  Problem went away (it may have gone away anyway who knows).
I tend to wear boots when off road, and walking shoes/trainer style, when on footpaths.  I am luck that I can get away with some cheap shoes and boots from Millets (Peter North ones), but I do get sore tendons in my left foot, about were I press the clutch in on my car.  I drove automatics for years and it started when I changed back to a manual.
Anyone know how to cure foot tendinitis?
I don't use emojis, irony is better, you decide

ninthace

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Re: Walking trainers or boots
« Reply #7 on: 13:58:24, 06/03/20 »
For the last 2 months I have been rehabilitating my knee by doing increasingly long road walks in trainers, accompanied by Mrs N, also in walking trainers.  This week we went back to road walking in boots for the first time since Christmas.  We both remarked how much more comfortable we were during the walk and our feet felt much better at the end, despite it being one of the longest walks we have done this year.  Both our boots are Altberg, Tetheras and Lady Fremingtons, so they are not light but the superior support makes up for it.
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Z3man

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Re: Walking trainers or boots
« Reply #8 on: 09:23:35, 07/03/20 »
Have a read up on Hoka Sky Kaha.

Not many user reviews on them but plenty of professional reviews. Most comfortable boot on the market, have a read up you will know what i mean.

The second most comfortable boot on the market is Salomon Quest 4D 3 GTX. Great boot but only problem is is that the grip of the Contragrip sole is rubbish, especially in the wet. But for what you are using them for it probably won't matter too much. I get mine resoled with a Vibram sole at Lancashire Sports Repairs, totally transforms them and makes them the perfect boot.

Both boots i have mentioned are designed around trainers hence the extra comfort, which is very good for long distances. They both have some give in the sole which is what makes them comfortable, most manufacturers make the soles rock hard and expect the insole to do all the work, but it doesn't work. You need some give in the sole and a good insole combined to make the boots comfortable.
« Last Edit: 09:46:00, 07/03/20 by Z3man »