Author Topic: Siamese Tree  (Read 1328 times)

MarkT

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Siamese Tree
« on: 14:12:28, 06/03/20 »
During a walk through Holme Wood nr Loweswater in The Lake district I came across this tree which clearly starts off as just 1 tree, being one trunk but as you can see the tree then splits and two trees growing to the top but still slightly joined.








How has nature managed that?

SteamyTea

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Re: Siamese Tree
« Reply #1 on: 16:15:35, 06/03/20 »
How has nature managed that?
Quite often caused by disease, often a virus.
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fernman

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Re: Siamese Tree
« Reply #2 on: 17:21:09, 06/03/20 »
Explain these ones then, photographed during my Chilterns rambles.
My guess is they're the overgrown remnants of layered hedges - created by bending and twisting saplings to create a living boundary or barrier - made in the last 100-200 years.




SteamyTea

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Re: Siamese Tree
« Reply #3 on: 21:02:19, 06/03/20 »
Could be old coppice. Bodgers did strange things in the Chilterns. Was it near High Wycombe?
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fernman

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Re: Siamese Tree
« Reply #4 on: 21:58:43, 06/03/20 »
Could be old coppice. Bodgers did strange things in the Chilterns. Was it near High Wycombe?

Yes, the first one was roughly Wendover area, well to the north of High Wycombe, and the second one was roughly Great Missenden area, also north of HW but closer. I thought maybe coppice for the second one, but it's still a bit odd, being linear.

Here's a classic ancient coppice, this one on the escarpment above Princes Risborough which again is north of HW:


SteamyTea

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Re: Siamese Tree
« Reply #5 on: 22:35:46, 06/03/20 »
Yes, the first one was roughly Wendover area, well to the north of High Wycombe, and the second one was roughly Great Missenden area, also north of HW but closer. I thought maybe coppice for the second one, but it's still a bit odd, being linear.

Here's a classic ancient coppice, this one on the escarpment above Princes Risborough which again is north of HW:

I know all those places.  And the Icknield way. Buckinghamshire is one of the few places with chalk streams.  Think the one in Hughenden Park is flowing again.
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lostme1

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Re: Siamese Tree
« Reply #6 on: 23:26:25, 06/03/20 »
Could the linear one be a tree that was blown over many years ago. There are trees in my local woods which were blown down, but still with some roots, in the storm of 1987 which have since produced vertical trunks.
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fernman

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Re: Siamese Tree
« Reply #7 on: 09:29:10, 07/03/20 »
I think that is less probable. I've seen many trees like that in north Wales  - example in picture below - but they have fallen in the direction of the wind, and they are helped to continue growing by the high rainfall there. The ones in my earlier pictures, and others I've seen like them, are along field boundaries, and if they had blown down they would be less likely to survive with the south-east's lower rainfall.

   

SteamyTea

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Re: Siamese Tree
« Reply #8 on: 19:17:49, 08/03/20 »
Here are some local beech trees.  Not sure they like it down here.




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fernman

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Re: Siamese Tree
« Reply #9 on: 20:51:43, 08/03/20 »
The 2nd and 3rd ones appear to be old pollards. Really not sure about the 1st one though!

Edit: Looking again at the 3rd photo, there is another pollard on the far right, with two apparent coppiced trees on the left and a third just to the right of the main subject.
« Last Edit: 08:46:56, 09/03/20 by fernman »

SteamyTea

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Re: Siamese Tree
« Reply #10 on: 13:39:55, 11/03/20 »
Saw this today
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fernman

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Re: Siamese Tree
« Reply #11 on: 12:53:54, 12/03/20 »
That's a good one! It looks as though something that has since died grew twined around the tree, but I can't think of anything whose stem would have grown to that size.


Here's an odd branch I spotted during yesterdays walk in the Hambledon, Oxfordshire, area: