Author Topic: Normal for Norfolk!  (Read 970 times)

pleb

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Normal for Norfolk!
« on: 20:26:45, 12/04/20 »

Ridge

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Re: Normal for Norfolk!
« Reply #1 on: 21:11:04, 12/04/20 »
Bog standard for Belper

April

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Re: Normal for Norfolk!
« Reply #2 on: 07:40:42, 13/04/20 »
 :) This will give the children in Belper something to tell their grandchildren.
"Who would've thought...... you are light and darkness coming through" words by Tim Armstrong

Ridge

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Re: Normal for Norfolk!
« Reply #3 on: 09:35:41, 13/04/20 »
:) This will give the children in Belper something to tell their grandchildren.


I remember t'gret Moo o' 2020. By, them wot days when animal impersonations were animal impersonations. Young folk today don't know their Aberdeen Angus from their elbow.

Percy

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Re: Normal for Norfolk!
« Reply #4 on: 11:40:02, 13/04/20 »
Bog standard for Belper
De rigeur in Derbyshire.

ninthace

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Re: Normal for Norfolk!
« Reply #5 on: 11:49:21, 13/04/20 »
De rigeur in Derbyshire.
Direkly in Devon
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Ridge

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Re: Normal for Norfolk!
« Reply #6 on: 12:37:10, 13/04/20 »
Direkly in Devon
Had to look it up
Quote
Dreckly - On the surface of it, this means the same as directly. But in the context of finding out when someone is about to arrive at an appointment, deliver something, or complete an urgent task, it also means the same as “When I am good and ready” with an undercurrent of “Don’t worry, I’m on it” and a hint of “Stop tapping your wrist, we don’t do things this fast around here.”
Essentially dreckly is the West Country version of mañana.

ninthace

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Re: Normal for Norfolk!
« Reply #7 on: 13:13:44, 13/04/20 »
In my experience there is no equivalent for the word mañana in either Greek or French that has that much urgency associated it.
In German there are the expressions "sofort" and "gleich".  If a waiter says "ich komm gleich", it means I have seen you and will still continue to ignore you, whereas "sofort" means exactly the same thing but with even more diligence.
« Last Edit: 16:40:34, 13/04/20 by ninthace »
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fernman

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Re: Normal for Norfolk!
« Reply #8 on: 15:46:56, 13/04/20 »
In my experience there is no equivalent for the word mañana in either Greek or French that has that much urgency associated it.

In my experience of Greece and its people, there are a number of equivalents which are transmitted in English, these include "it will be soon", "two minutes" and "sit".

ninthace

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Re: Normal for Norfolk!
« Reply #9 on: 16:40:10, 13/04/20 »
In my experience of Greece and its people, there are a number of equivalents which are transmitted in English, these include "it will be soon", "two minutes" and "sit".
That's true, but  mañana is used more when dealing with tradesmen.  There is no German equivalent to mañana as they often surprise you by actually turning up.
The Anglo/Greek "sit", "2 mins", "it will be soon" are the equivalent of the German gleich and sofort and have just as much chance of an immediate outcome.  :)
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Bigfoot_Mike

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Re: Normal for Norfolk!
« Reply #10 on: 18:15:19, 13/04/20 »
Our relatives living in Wales often say “now, in a minute”.