Author Topic: Synthetic baselayers  (Read 1344 times)

Ronin83

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 358
Re: Synthetic baselayers
« Reply #15 on: 18:48:05, 21/04/20 »
I have 2 icebreaker long-sleeved which are too hot on me for anything other than winter really(when being active - walking) and a 100% merino t shirt from aldi which is a bit cooler. They are all a bit itchy, but not unbearable.
My worst issue with merino is the huge static charge when combined with other clothing, especially fleece. It's ridiculous.
Zap!

gunwharfman

  • Veteran Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5139
Re: Synthetic baselayers
« Reply #16 on: 18:56:22, 21/04/20 »
Thank you, that's worth bearing in mind, never mentioned in any reviews of course?

pinkhippy

  • New Member
  • *
  • Posts: 5
Re: Synthetic baselayers
« Reply #17 on: 22:15:58, 07/08/20 »
Hi! I know this is an old post, but since I'm new on the forum I just came across it.


Have you read any articles about making wool garments - including merino - less itchy? I've seen a bunch of them out there and it's a bit of a faff (soaking the garment in water with vinegar, then with conditioner, drying flat on towels, then putting in the freezer overnight), but there's a lot of articles saying the same thing and I heard from someone who tried it that it works...



I've had Helly (smelly) Hansen synthetic baselayers for years and I really liked them (an old model more than the one I bought more recently). I had the men's baselayer initially (I think when I got my first one they didn't do gendered baselayers) and found it fit great without clingy. For a better comparison, my dad has also used them for years and really likes them.


That said, I do prefer the non-synthetic base layers when I can get my hands on them. My problem with Icebreaker in particular is that I find they shred really easily (haven't bought anthing in the last few years, so maybe they have improved that?). I can't get merino easily in Peru, so I haven't tried any other brands.


I've heard that some people who find merino itchy, don't have the same issue with alpaca wool, but alpaca still shares merino's other benefits. I know it's not super common in the outdoor market (therefore hard to find and rather expensive!) but as far as I'm aware, there are a couple of companies out there that do alpaca wool base layers.

Sevenup

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 56
Re: Synthetic baselayers
« Reply #18 on: 22:25:36, 07/08/20 »
Have a look at www.sportspursuit.com they sometimes sell alpaca base layers. I think you might need to sign up first.
Iíve ever done anything to merino except wear it and wash it. Recently bought a load of Isobaa stuff which I really like. Very fine but too warm for this time of year

pinkhippy

  • New Member
  • *
  • Posts: 5
Re: Synthetic baselayers
« Reply #19 on: 23:08:38, 07/08/20 »
Have a look at sportspursuit they sometimes sell alpaca base layers. I think you might need to sign up first.
Iíve ever done anything to merino except wear it and wash it. Recently bought a load of Isobaa stuff which I really like. Very fine but too warm for this time of year


I hadn't seen that brand before, Sevenup. It looks like those baselayers are a blend of fibers, so that may help with any itch factor, but not sure 30% is enough to get the real benefits of the alpaca? I found a list by searching "alpaca wool baselayer" that includes 100% merino, alpaca and even yak wool options!

Sevenup

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 56
Re: Synthetic baselayers
« Reply #20 on: 06:53:07, 08/08/20 »
The isobaa is merino only.  I really like their stuff that Iíve bought. Itís finer than the Icebreaker stuff Iíve used for years. The Ďweightí appears critical. I have some of their Ď200í tops but could do with 140 or 150 weight for the next few months. Searching for merino on sports pursuit also brings up a variety of manufacturers. Only some of them are designed for walking or skiing many items are closer to leisure wear. I saw some alpaca base layers on the sports pursuit site but they change their promotions regularly and, of course, they sell out on limited stock so might not be much about now. I found this https://www.sportpursuit.com/search?s=Alpaca I fear Iíd cook in alpaca. Iím already too warm in winter with merino at times. Iím not sure that itís getting cold enough nowadays to justify the purchase.

gunwharfman

  • Veteran Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5139
Re: Synthetic baselayers
« Reply #21 on: 10:15:49, 08/08/20 »
Because I have them in my drawer I work through all of my baselayers when I run off-road. I'm now into the habit of wearing my Brynge 'string vests' under most of them. The 'string vest' seems to stop me itching when I wear my merinos and my synthetics don't seem to smell so quickly either. I conclude that my vest creates a small airspace between my skin and baselayer, just enough to make my 'unusable' garments usable again. The vests are not so good at the moment, it's just too hot to wear two layers, so until it gets cooler the merinos stay in my drawer.

Stube

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 366
Re: Synthetic baselayers
« Reply #22 on: 11:06:06, 08/08/20 »
I gave up wearing synthetics decades ago - I disliked their feel against my skin.
When I started serious walking again, I initially wore cotton polo shirts (i like collars) - but they're heavy and get musty after 3 days or so.

I kept reading about merino baselayers being good for a week or more (my typical hike length) so I bought some triple discounted items from Trespass / Mountain Warehouse and have never looked back. These days I just pick up items from charity shops O0

Wool and silk should only be wahed in pure soap or other specialist delicates cleaners (and at a low temp). The difference in feel compared to main wash detergents is amazing. Indeed a single hot wash with a biological powder can destroy a garment.

I usually walk in just a base layer the breathability of knitted garments works well in hot weather.



ninthace

  • Veteran Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7173
Re: Synthetic baselayers
« Reply #23 on: 12:16:35, 08/08/20 »
Some of my base layers are "proper" base layers and some are just ordinary clothes.  They are divided into long sleeved and short sleeeved with sub categories of proper shirts (collars, buttons etc) and the rest. They are a mix of brands and to be honest I have no idea what most of them are made of.  I just look at the weather and pick one.
Solvitur Ambulando