Author Topic: Walking in the Rain  (Read 1341 times)

WhitstableDave

  • Veteran Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 672
Walking in the Rain
« on: 17:08:10, 28/04/20 »
It was exactly three weeks ago that I decided to exercise at home instead of doing ever more repetitions of local walks. It wasn't just the daily variations of the same two routes that was wearing me down, but the increasing strain of having to always be conscious of where other people might be and how best to avoid them.

It helped that we'd just received the treadmill we'd ordered, so there was an alternative, and it also helped that I'd just reached 1000 miles for the year before the second week in April - a target I'd been aiming at since the start of the year.

Having decided to exercise at home, I gave myself a let-out clause (literally!): I'd go out for a walk on a day when the forecast was for serious rain. My thinking was simple... I wasn't going to go out because too many other people were going out, but very few people go out when it rains heavily so my reason for not going out wouldn't apply.

Then, of course, we had three weeks of mainly warm sunshine here in the sunny south-east with barely a drop of rain.

Today though, the forecast was for heavy rain. I'm thoroughly enjoying my treadmill treks along some of our national trails as well as all the other amazing activities I can do in the comfort of my conservatory, so the decision to go outside for a walk today wasn't as easy as I'd expected. In other threads, members have talked about the difference in 'wanting' and 'needing' to engage in walks from the front door compared with those that involve driving to do. Personally, I'm not convinced that many people have a physical need to leave their home to exercise when they might (for example) walk around their gardens or go up and down their stairs, but my reluctance to go out today made me think there might possibly be a psychological need. I love going out, so why wasn't I keen to go? And if I stayed at home for another three weeks, might I be even less keen next time?

So on went my waterproofs and off I went!

I did the shortest version of my less preferred lockdown route - a circuit of just under 10 miles, along quiet lanes to the edge of the village of Herne and back along the cycle path by the Thanet Way (an 'A' road with a wide verge).

On the lanes section, I passed the only place I know of locally where ramsons (wild garlic) grow and I was delighted to see they were starting to flower.  :)



And this is a section of the cycle path by the Thanet Way. As I said, it was pouring with rain and so it was no surprise that I saw only two other people exercising this morning - a pair of soggy joggers. (By the way, that's a path not a stream!)



I did ponder on the question of 'need' though...

If people claim to need to leave their homes to exercise, and if 'needing exercise' implies that fitness or health will suffer if the need isn't fulfilled, then why do so few people who need to go walking on sunny days not need to go walking when it rains?
« Last Edit: 17:12:38, 28/04/20 by WhitstableDave »

ninthace

  • Veteran Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6524
Re: Walking in the Rain
« Reply #1 on: 17:20:33, 28/04/20 »
If people claim to need to leave their homes to exercise, and if 'needing exercise' implies that fitness or health will suffer if the need isn't fulfilled, then why do so few people who need to go walking on sunny days not need to go walking when it rains?
  Simple.  150 mins exercise a week is considered to be enough for most people.  You can dicker a bit around that number and the type of exercise but Google the question "how much exercise does an adult need"  (note the verb).
The guidelines say you may go out once a day for exercise, not that you must.  Given the choice, unsurprisingly most people choose to go out in the dry.  I count myself amongst them - walking in the rain can be downright miserable.
Solvitur Ambulando

WhitstableDave

  • Veteran Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 672
Re: Walking in the Rain
« Reply #2 on: 18:55:30, 28/04/20 »
  Simple.  150 mins exercise a week is considered to be enough for most people.  You can dicker a bit around that number and the type of exercise but Google the question "how much exercise does an adult need"  (note the verb).
The guidelines say you may go out once a day for exercise, not that you must.  Given the choice, unsurprisingly most people choose to go out in the dry.  I count myself amongst them - walking in the rain can be downright miserable.

According to the NHS website, most adults should 'do at least 150 minutes of moderate intensity activity a week'.

It's not dickering around anything to point out that 'at least' implies a minimum and it certainly does not imply "enough". Who do you believe considers 150 minutes of (an unspecified level of) exercise to be enough?

Further, the NHS website says that the minimum of 150 minutes exercise should be of moderate intensity. Brisk walking is considered to be moderate intensity exercise, whereas (for example) a stroll at under about 3mph is not.

In other words, the NHS recommends at least 150 minutes of exercise a week during which (and for at least 150 minutes) you are able to talk but not sing.

(I don't think I can maintain this degree of emboldening and emphasis. In any case, it shouldn't really be necessary.)

Toxicbunny

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 168
Re: Walking in the Rain
« Reply #3 on: 19:32:56, 28/04/20 »
I go out 365 days a year rain or shine. The only time I really hate going out is gale force winds as there is always trees coming down plus if I'm walking in the woods I like to hear. I dont mind the rain just hate wearing wellies. I have a working dog so i have to go out even when its pouring down. I dont mind the rain i just wear waterproofs. We are forecast rain tomorrow i suspect my walk will be quieter. However my area has quietened down a lot this week with walkers and joggers.

ninthace

  • Veteran Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6524
Re: Walking in the Rain
« Reply #4 on: 19:48:03, 28/04/20 »
@WD  You don't want to dicker then you do.  "At least" and "minimum" mean just that.  It means that you can do any amount more if you want to but you are not required to.  Anyway, that is by the by, I still answered your question.  People feel they can meet their needs without getting wet.  The amount, quality and type exercise anyone takes to meet their perceived needs is a matter of personal choice.
Solvitur Ambulando

Birdman

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 85
Re: Walking in the Rain
« Reply #5 on: 20:00:04, 28/04/20 »
Annual average precipitation in the UK is 885mm. The annual average of the entire world is 990mm. We are below average.
My travel and walking reports: https://www.hikingbirdman.com/

Mel

  • Veteran Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 9521
Re: Walking in the Rain
« Reply #6 on: 20:03:40, 28/04/20 »
I love walking in summer rain.  The feel of it.  The smell of it.  Even the smell of it as it hits tarmac.  The sound of it when it's absolutely pelting down in those big, fat bloblets.  I love getting absolutely soaked through to the skin in it.  Staring at the splishes it makes in puddles.  Walking through puddles. Frog spotting.  The noticeable silence of the birds.  Walking through woodland where the leaves break the fall of the rain, softening the noise to a gentle "sssssss".  Walking out of the other side of it and seeing a rainbow.  Feeling that odd, intensely humid heat that tells me there's more rain to come.  You know when the rain's properly stopped when the birds start singing again.  The ground steaming if it's been particularly hot beforehand.


Yes, there's something magical about walking in the rain.


It's just started to rain here now.  Soft rain.  Gentle rain.


Do I?  Don't I?














“I'm tired of people bein' ugly to each other. It feels like pieces of glass in my head.” - John Coffey, The Green Mile

Birdman

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 85
Re: Walking in the Rain
« Reply #7 on: 20:22:18, 28/04/20 »
I love walking in summer rain.  The feel of it.  The smell of it.  Even the smell of it as it hits tarmac. 


I prefer dry weather, but I can definitely relate to this! The smell...Mmmm!
This is even better in countries that have very long dry periods. When the first raindrops fall it releases so many wonderful fragrances!
My travel and walking reports: https://www.hikingbirdman.com/

GinAndPlatonic

  • Veteran Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 817
Re: Walking in the Rain
« Reply #8 on: 20:36:08, 28/04/20 »




Yes, there's something magical about walking in the rain.

It's just started to rain here now.  Soft rain.  Gentle rain.


Amen to that.& I used to love running in driving rain and snow too. You really know you are alive, and on your return to a warm home and a drink of whatever takes your fancy..that really does the trick.



I prefer dry weather, but I can definitely relate to this! The smell...Mmmm!
This is even better in countries that have very long dry periods. When the first raindrops fall it releases so many wonderful fragrances!

 O0

Toxicbunny

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 168
Re: Walking in the Rain
« Reply #9 on: 20:47:50, 28/04/20 »
Amen to that.& I used to love running in driving rain and snow too. You really know you are alive, and on your return to a warm home and a drink of whatever takes your fancy..that really does the trick.


 O0
I love the snow but we hardly got any this year. I was hoping for the beast from the east to return but it didnt. I was out walking local when the big snow storm came. Even though I had a thermal hat on and neck scarf the headache from that cold wind I wont forget. The dog loved it.

richardh1905

  • Veteran Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4315
Re: Walking in the Rain
« Reply #10 on: 21:34:27, 28/04/20 »
After living in Orkney for the previous 17 years, rain that isn't horizontal is still a bit of a novelty to me, and like Toxicbunny I have an energetic dog so I am out every day, rain or shine. She needs her exercise as well!
« Last Edit: 21:38:03, 28/04/20 by richardh1905 »

richardh1905

  • Veteran Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4315
Re: Walking in the Rain
« Reply #11 on: 21:36:39, 28/04/20 »
PS - don't like the look of that stream/path, Dave!

Bigfoot_Mike

  • Veteran Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1655
Re: Walking in the Rain
« Reply #12 on: 21:51:51, 28/04/20 »
I love walking in summer rain.  The feel of it.  The smell of it.  Even the smell of it as it hits tarmac.  The sound of it when it's absolutely pelting down in those big, fat bloblets.  I love getting absolutely soaked through to the skin in it.  Staring at the splishes it makes in puddles.  Walking through puddles. Frog spotting.  The noticeable silence of the birds.  Walking through woodland where the leaves break the fall of the rain, softening the noise to a gentle "sssssss".  Walking out of the other side of it and seeing a rainbow.  Feeling that odd, intensely humid heat that tells me there's more rain to come.  You know when the rain's properly stopped when the birds start singing again.  The ground steaming if it's been particularly hot beforehand.


Yes, there's something magical about walking in the rain.


It's just started to rain here now.  Soft rain.  Gentle rain.


Do I?  Don't I?
That’s very poetic Mel.

Bigfoot_Mike

  • Veteran Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1655
Re: Walking in the Rain
« Reply #13 on: 21:53:16, 28/04/20 »
Annual average precipitation in the UK is 885mm. The annual average of the entire world is 990mm. We are below average.
Averages hide a lot of information. The west coast of Scotland , the Lakes and Crib Goch will have much more rainfall than average.

ninthace

  • Veteran Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6524
Re: Walking in the Rain
« Reply #14 on: 22:04:40, 28/04/20 »
Wandering around in clammy waterproofs with steamed up glasses - whats to like?  These days I avoid the rain if at all possible - one of the joys of retirement.
Solvitur Ambulando