Author Topic: Wild Camping in the Press.  (Read 831 times)

taxino8

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Islandplodder

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Re: Wild Camping in the Press.
« Reply #1 on: 10:35:53, 21/05/20 »
Interesting indeed, thanks for posting.

barewirewalker

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Re: Wild Camping in the Press.
« Reply #2 on: 11:39:30, 21/05/20 »
If it is time for a discussion has this article missed serious a point?
Quote
This type of camping is lightweight, done in small numbers and only for two or three nights in any one place.
The serious multiday walker will not be only walking in the remote parts of national parks. Most of us, who have wild camped enroute are not doing it for some touchy/feely experience of getting close to nature, but a more functional 'Pitch at dusk, break camp a dawn and move on'. No signs left perhaps some crushed grass, but even this if spotted can create a sense of outrage against property, unless the benefits of allowing such activity is not recognised.

The allowable charge for a landowner to make for grazing a horse is a Halfpenny, I believe that this was set in law at the time that the happeny was the lowest denomination of coin at a time it was recognised that people traveled and had to sleep out of doors. The pedestrian was not subject to any charge as it was presumed he either went or carried his own food and did not graze on the land.

So in history do we not have a case for wild camping? The argument against this may be the increase of ground under tillage, but now we have 'Field Margins'. A farm adviser on access once responded to me, on the issue of fields margins that they were for 'nature'. We humans have been sharing our environment with nature ever since we evolved, it is only when we go into that environment with predatory intent that we are a threat.
BWW
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gunwharfman

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Re: Wild Camping in the Press.
« Reply #3 on: 12:16:19, 21/05/20 »
For me, 'wild camping' means that I either want to avoid paying for a campsite, I resent being asked to pay more 10 a night, or I haven't been able to find, or reach a campsite!

Also wild camping + pub = excellent, wild camping + no pub, but full hip flask = tolerable, wild camping + no pub, no hip flask = dreadful! Cows in field = the pits!!!

ninthace

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Re: Wild Camping in the Press.
« Reply #4 on: 12:18:46, 21/05/20 »
Interesting article - nearly a year old though, so it did not create much of a stir.
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richardh1905

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Re: Wild Camping in the Press.
« Reply #5 on: 13:35:53, 21/05/20 »
Thought provoking article - thank you for posting.

barewirewalker

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Re: Wild Camping in the Press.
« Reply #6 on: 10:11:54, 22/05/20 »
Interesting read though and does define Trespass in England succinctly. Those of us tempted to play a little loosely with the righteous way, take heart. A primary lesson is to keep your head well down till the exit point of your foray onto private land is the most direct way off. Then you will not sent back from whence you came.  8)
BWW
Their Land is in Our Country.

ninthace

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Re: Wild Camping in the Press.
« Reply #7 on: 12:06:52, 22/05/20 »
In recent years, I have only once been sent back whence I came, even though I was most of the way through a small enclave in the middle of a large area of open access land.  Moreover, I got a motorised escort to make sure that I went back the cattle grid at the entry and set off round their fence line.  Never even offered me a lift!
The excuse was "If I let you through, I would have to let everybody through"
Given where I was, a mile or so east side of Nine Standards, I was probably the only walker he had seen all year.  The trespass consisted of following a concrete track through the enclave away from buildings so I am not sure what harm i would have done anyway. 
Solvitur Ambulando

BuzyG

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Re: Wild Camping in the Press.
« Reply #8 on: 12:11:39, 22/05/20 »
Yes, that was well worth a read.  I tended to assume the rest of the UK was similar to Dartmoor, where areas are specifically mapped that allow wild camping.  Having only ever done day walks from overnight accommodation in North wales and the Lakes.  Makes me appreciate the freedoms we have on Dartmoor all the moor.  :)


The Scottish system has much to be applauded, but the population density is so much less, that more open rules relying on individual self responsibility can work.

barewirewalker

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Re: Wild Camping in the Press.
« Reply #9 on: 13:56:47, 22/05/20 »
In recent years, I have only once been sent back whence I came, even though I was most of the way through a small enclave in the middle of a large area of open access land.  Moreover, I got a motorised escort to make sure that I went back the cattle grid at the entry and set off round their fence line.  Never even offered me a lift!
The excuse was "If I let you through, I would have to let everybody through"
Given where I was, a mile or so east side of Nine Standards, I was probably the only walker he had seen all year.  The trespass consisted of following a concrete track through the enclave away from buildings so I am not sure what harm i would have done anyway.
That is the great thing about Scottish law, the occupier can ask for a reason and then request but not insist on a return to entry point. It is a mistake to think of all Scottish route being through remote areas. The Solway firth area has much agricultural land, well worth walking. Ian Niall's Poachers Handbook describes some interesting forays in the 1930's-40's, even then the trespasser had to be caught poaching to warrant summary eviction.
BWW
Their Land is in Our Country.

SteamyTea

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Re: Wild Camping in the Press.
« Reply #10 on: 15:41:53, 22/05/20 »
The way I understand Trespass is that you have to be asked to leave, and only if you refuse, can you then be charged with trespass.
Most land owners will know that the time and cost involved in prosecution is not worth it.
So they turn to intimidation and threats instead.
Which comes under criminal law and is dealt with much faster and cheaper.


If you want to wind up a farmer, point out that tomorrow you will be 20 miles away, but they will still be an angry t*at.
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Slogger

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Re: Wild Camping in the Press.
« Reply #11 on: 15:44:02, 22/05/20 »
Wild camping allowed in Scotland, mountain biking also allowed anywhere walkers can go too. However not always the case.During our Munro baggin years we discovered that an awful lot of lot of the privately owned land had access restrictions.One time, on recommendation from the Munro guidebook we were using, we had to phone the glen gate keeper to arrange for her to open the gate giving road access to the glen. When we arrived at this very remote location, she asked what time we would be exiting. We informed her that we intended doing several munro's and wild camping over two nights. She at first told us that the landowner would not allow any overnight camping as it was stalking season. After a bit of sweet talking she, neither permitted nor disallowed it, just saying here's the gate lock combination, be sure to lock the gate behind you when you leave. The estate by the way was owned by an Arabian Prince.

BuzyG

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Re: Wild Camping in the Press.
« Reply #12 on: 18:31:17, 22/05/20 »
Wild camping allowed in Scotland, mountain biking also allowed anywhere walkers can go too. However not always the case.During our Munro baggin years we discovered that an awful lot of lot of the privately owned land had access restrictions.One time, on recommendation from the Munro guidebook we were using, we had to phone the glen gate keeper to arrange for her to open the gate giving road access to the glen. When we arrived at this very remote location, she asked what time we would be exiting. We informed her that we intended doing several munro's and wild camping over two nights. She at first told us that the landowner would not allow any overnight camping as it was stalking season. After a bit of sweet talking she, neither permitted nor disallowed it, just saying here's the gate lock combination, be sure to lock the gate behind you when you leave. The estate by the way was owned by an Arabian Prince.
Did you find an old Lamp.  ;)

WILDWALKINGUK

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Re: Wild Camping in the Press.
« Reply #13 on: 07:27:47, 23/05/20 »
I wild camp because I love the freedom off camping when I feel like it, that way being able to change my route as it suits me. This is really useful walking with children, of which I have 4 and also cannot justify the cost of accommodation. I work as a handy man in a carehome when I'm needed, 2 or 3 days a week. I walked nearly 1200 miles last year from Lands End to John O'Groats wild camping 58 nights, bothys 2 nights and paid B&B 2 nights. Total cost 1300. I wouldn't have been able to do this walk if I had to pay for accommodation every night, as I estimated it would cost around 3500. By the way 1200 was spent on food and 100 on the B&B, repairs and fuel for my stove. Not one person complained about me wild camping but I did stick to my https://wildwalkinguk.com/2019/06/18/my-11-wild-camping-rules/ and camped late left early, leaving no trace I had been there.

richardh1905

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Re: Wild Camping in the Press.
« Reply #14 on: 07:50:34, 23/05/20 »
I wild camp because I love the freedom off camping when I feel like it, that way being able to change my route as it suits me. This is really useful walking with children, of which I have 4 and also cannot justify the cost of accommodation. I work as a handy man in a carehome when I'm needed, 2 or 3 days a week. I walked nearly 1200 miles last year from Lands End to John O'Groats wild camping 58 nights, bothys 2 nights and paid B&B 2 nights. Total cost 1300. I wouldn't have been able to do this walk if I had to pay for accommodation every night, as I estimated it would cost around 3500. By the way 1200 was spent on food and 100 on the B&B, repairs and fuel for my stove. Not one person complained about me wild camping but I did stick to my https://wildwalkinguk.com/2019/06/18/my-11-wild-camping-rules/ and camped late left early, leaving no trace I had been there.

I remember enjoying your blog. I did a double take when I saw the cost, and thought 'Good Grief - he eats a lot!' - but then did the maths: 20 a day doesn't sound too unreasonable if you are taking advantage of cafes and pubs on the way.


My wild camping trips are at the other end of the scale - my ideal trip is a one or two nighter somewhere really wild.