Author Topic: Wild Camping in the Press.  (Read 833 times)

WILDWALKINGUK

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Re: Wild Camping in the Press.
« Reply #15 on: 08:06:30, 23/05/20 »
Yes a lot of pubs and cafes. It was a great time to rest for an hour or two during the day (sitting in a chair/real luxury when wild camping). This was the best and most surprising part of walking Lejog. I met some amazing people along the way and had some great conversations. I'm not a particularly sociable person, mostly work alone etc. But I loved the walk and all the people I met made it.
From memory I had 35 main meals, 25 full cooked breakfasts and 6 takeaways. The best bit was the 62 pints and I never put any weight on, I didn't loose any either.
To justify the above, I did find that I needed to eat well to keep going, both physically and mentally. I walked a lot further on the days I had good meals.

SteamyTea

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Re: Wild Camping in the Press.
« Reply #16 on: 08:23:36, 23/05/20 »
Yes a lot of pubs and cafes. It was a great time to rest for an hour or two during the day (sitting in a chair/real luxury when wild camping). This was the best and most surprising part of walking Lejog. I met some amazing people along the way and had some great conversations. I'm not a particularly sociable person, mostly work alone etc. But I loved the walk and all the people I met made it.
From memory I had 35 main meals, 25 full cooked breakfasts and 6 takeaways. The best bit was the 62 pints and I never put any weight on, I didn't loose any either.
To justify the above, I did find that I needed to eat well to keep going, both physically and mentally. I walked a lot further on the days I had good meals.
Do you find there is a temptation to have a really large cooked breakfast, everyday, then sleep it off.  I do.
Interesting about sitting down in a chair.  I have a collapsible chair that has a mass of just under 900g.  Bit of a luxury, and would like to get one that is even lighter (have ordered some CF tubes to see if I can modify it).  It gets more use on relatively short walks when I go to a cafe and all the tables and chairs are occupied by families and worse (dog walkers).
I am fairly sociable, but don't like to inflict myself on others, especially when sweaty.
I don't use emojis, irony is better, you decide

Slogger

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Re: Wild Camping in the Press.
« Reply #17 on: 12:10:44, 23/05/20 »
Did you find an old Lamp.  ;)
Ellaborate?

Bhod

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Re: Wild Camping in the Press.
« Reply #18 on: 12:42:41, 23/05/20 »
Ellaborate?
At a guess, tenuous reference (Arabian Prince), to Aladdin?
Back to back Lyke Wake Walk attempt in aid of MIND - https://uk.virginmoneygiving.com/RoyRix

BuzyG

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Re: Wild Camping in the Press.
« Reply #19 on: 23:25:56, 23/05/20 »
At a guess, tenuous reference (Arabian Prince), to Aladdin?
Well done Watson.  O0

barewirewalker

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Re: Wild Camping in the Press.
« Reply #20 on: 10:56:15, 24/05/20 »
Wild camping allowed in Scotland, mountain biking also allowed anywhere walkers can go too. However not always the case.During our Munro baggin years we discovered that an awful lot of lot of the privately owned land had access restrictions.One time, on recommendation from the Munro guidebook we were using, we had to phone the glen gate keeper to arrange for her to open the gate giving road access to the glen. When we arrived at this very remote location, she asked what time we would be exiting. We informed her that we intended doing several munro's and wild camping over two nights. She at first told us that the landowner would not allow any overnight camping as it was stalking season. After a bit of sweet talking she, neither permitted nor disallowed it, just saying here's the gate lock combination, be sure to lock the gate behind you when you leave. The estate by the way was owned by an Arabian Prince.
Interesting experience. It is often an interesting to balance the true feelings of the employers of landowners, with their loyalty to the ambitions of their masters. In Scotland last year walking near Loch Awe Mrs BWW acute hearing located falling water, we deviated some miles from the well trodden way to land up in the most magical combination of rapids ravines and falls and we had it all to ourselves.  We tried to direct a couple, who expressed interest in our discovery, but though my directions were detailed the land management impediments were too great for them to complete the route. Now my physical abilities are no longer up to Ben Cruachen, but this location was up to that sort of experience and Mrs BWW was thrilled with our find.

In the local Pub, after, we talked with locals, there was no condemnation that we had transgressed, even though they were in the pay of the landowner, a London banker. Sad thing is the location could make a real focal purpose for several possible routes.


Add to this, when The Queen Mothers estate tried to shut off part of the Munroe round, in the ensuing hooha the BSMC quoted official Scottish tourism figures that put the total annual earnings of all field spots at 56 million or so yet the earnings from walking alone of the access dependent pursuits is in the region of 540 million.

Is this the sort of magic lamp that should be polished?
BWW
Their Land is in Our Country.