Author Topic: Have you walked for a 'purpose' or because of personal interest.  (Read 3066 times)

Toxicbunny

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There are lots of stone circles and Pictish stones in Aberdeenshire
Scotland is on my list once it's safe to travel and stay there. I had planned the 12 Apostles stone circle up ilkley moor this week but been to warm to do a long walk with my dog.

ninthace

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Then there is Dartmoor with stone circles, kists, avenues, standing stones and whole bronze age villages.
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BuzyG

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I walk as I love the outdoors and nature. I love all the menhirs and stone circles and usually base walks round some historical significance rather than just a walk.  I usually do 10 to 15 miles as I also walk my dog you can never tire a sled dog out.
Have you tried this site.

https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/map-search?clearresults=true

I use it, often after a walk, to research things I come across whist out.  I seldom plan to go and look at some thing though, I am sometimes just curious to know what I was looking at and over time you naturally get to know more about the structure you see. 

For years I thought that many many Tin workings were natural features.  It was only after I member of our ramblers group presented several quite detailed talks whist out on the moor, that I gained a fuller appreciation of what was in front of me much of the time, on my own walks.

SteamyTea

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For years I thought that many many Tin workings were natural features.
Old Clay/Brick works are the same, they can look like natural bowls.  The road names can give the name away sometimes.
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SteamyTea

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Thinking on the whole idea of finding things of interest, maybe we should suggest something to look out for each week, then see how many people can spot it.
Would have to be pretty generic as geography/topology can make somethings almost impossible in some areas.


I shall kick off with, in the best geography lesson manner with 'Ox Bow Lake'.

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andybr

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Thinking on the whole idea of finding things of interest, maybe we should suggest something to look out for each week, then see how many people can spot it.
Would have to be pretty generic as geography/topology can make somethings almost impossible in some areas.


I shall kick off with, in the best geography lesson manner with 'Ox Bow Lake'.


That's easy. One of my regular wildlife watching walks takes me around the most "classic" Ox Bow Lake you could possibly imagine.

SteamyTea

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That's easy. One of my regular wildlife watching walks takes me around the most "classic" Ox Bow Lake you could possibly imagine.

Your turn to nominate something now.
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andybr

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Sorry. Done in a rush.
Something which always fascinates me is the chalk land streams which normally flow underground but just occasionally appear on the surface when conditions are right. Gyps Race is the local term but I do not know the official name for one.

WhitstableDave

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Sorry. Done in a rush.
Something which always fascinates me is the chalk land streams which normally flow underground but just occasionally appear on the surface when conditions are right. Gyps Race is the local term but I do not know the official name for one.

A lot of the ground in Kent is chalk and therefore there are a good many 'intermittent streams'. An example near Canterbury is the Nailbourne, which rarely has any water above ground. These streams are also known locally as 'chalk bournes'.

BuzyG

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Sorry. Done in a rush.
Something which always fascinates me is the chalk land streams which normally flow underground but just occasionally appear on the surface when conditions are right. Gyps Race is the local term but I do not know the official name for one.


Waterfalls vanishing before your eyes into scree is another I get transfixed by.  It just seems like magic even though you know what is going on. 

SteamyTea

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A lot of the ground in Kent is chalk and therefore there are a good many 'intermittent streams'. An example near Canterbury is the Nailbourne, which rarely has any water above ground. These streams are also known locally as 'chalk bournes'.
Some in Herts and Bucks too.  Don't think there are any down here.
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ninthace

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Waterfalls vanishing before your eyes into scree is another I get transfixed by.  It just seems like magic even though you know what is going on.
The waterfall off the Cirque de Gavarnie does that. - 422m and disappears on impact.
https://www.wondermondo.com/grande-cascade-de-gavarnie/
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andybr

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A lot of the ground in Kent is chalk and therefore there are a good many 'intermittent streams'. An example near Canterbury is the Nailbourne, which rarely has any water above ground. These streams are also known locally as 'chalk bournes'.
That makes sense as I am familiar with. winterbourne/burn to describe a seasonal stream.

ninthace

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God's Bridge on the Pennine Way near Bowes crosses the River Greta which normally runs underground for a fair part of its length on either side of the bridge.  I am sure many walkers on the PW  take it for a dry river bed with the odd pool but in reality it flows most of the year and resurfaces a few hundred yards downstream.
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Islandplodder

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I remember being shown a stream at the foot of Penyghent in the Yorkshire Dales where you could see another stream crossing under it. And then spending ages trying to find it again to show my son.
I believe the same thing happens at Malham cove where the stream coming out at the bottom isn't the stream that sinks down near the top, but they had to put dye in the water to prove that one, as the crossover is underground.